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The Film thread - Page 34

post #496 of 507
I liked Interstellar. Saw it at Imax smile.gif
post #497 of 507
Quote:
Originally Posted by Synthese View Post

One of my favorite movies of all time is Prospero's Books. Gielgud's incredible in it, and the set and costume and hell everything is fucking fantastic. On a related note, every halloween I unintentionally watch Coppola's Dracula, which is a shit movie but beautiful and I love it. I also love Brotherhood of the Wolf, which is also shit, but has (in addition to the new Iron Chef Chairman posing as a Native American) great sets and costumes and is, generally, pretty stylish.

Anyway, where I'm going with this is that I love opulent, stage-like set designs, incredible costuming, and acting that is probably better suited for the stage than the screen. Does anyone have any recommendations along these lines? I don't really know enough technical terminology to specify, but I like that stuff. I also like Ran, if that counts.


Maybe anything with Christopher Doyle as a cinematogropher?
e.g. Wong Kar-wei's 2046:




If you want something a bit nuts, try the Holy Mountain:

post #498 of 507
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldenTribe View Post

To refer back to Fuuma's unnecessarily uncharitable post, Nolan is one of the better filmmakers working in the mainstream today (I don't mind damning him with faint praise), and Prestige is undoubtedly one of his better films (alongside Memento, and, in my opinion, nothing else worth remarking upon outside of Ledger's performance in TDK).

You can't legitimately equate his high water mark with the outright garbage of Transformers, G.I. Joe and Fast Five.

That said, Interstellar is deeply inferior to The Prestige as anything but a vehicle for the special effects -- which are serviceable, but hardly memorable. It's a vacuous echo of Solaris and 2001 with a side helping of laughable metaphysics (referring to transcendental love, not time dilation, which Nolan already served up in Inception) that sabotages the much-vaunted input of theoretical physicists on the effects sequences and plot.

It's got slick production values in place of a soul, just like every other Nolan film. He should be grateful to get such talented casts -- speaking of which, McConaughey was quite good, Chastain was good, (I'm getting sick of seeing Michael Caine dragged into every Nolan project,) Hathaway was less believable as a scientist than she was as Catwoman (even before her hilarious speech about love), though I think the script just introduced her very poorly -- and Matt Damon was awful. I'm always happy to see John Lithgow getting work (he is amazing live on stage), but he hasn't had a properly meaty part in quite a while.

Hans Zimmer's music is the best thing in the film.

lurker[1].gif

I think you definitely can equate Nolan's stuff to Transformers, etc; it's essentially the same stuff repackaged into a different form for a different audience. Nolan plays very well with the young-ish, "intellectual" crowd, you know, mod houses, wine, coffee shops, reading Proust in public. His work is Transformers for people who want to be taken seriously or at least want to come off as serious people. The Prestige and his earlier works aren't exceptions to this either-- they've always been action-thriller-dramas catered towards people who may like to dabble in overexposed "thinking" concepts filled with all the tropes you'd expect from an action film.

Does that make him a bad filmmaker? I don't think so, I think he has his place in entertainment and can be highly enjoyable with the right mindset, and if you compare him to other mainstream acclaimed directors (Coens, PTA, etc etc) it's very easy to see what I'm talking about.

I don't understand why anyone would go to a Nolan movie expecting anything deeply philosophical explorations, but if you go in expecting an action movie with some neat little "huh interesting" tidbits then he's much more enjoyable.

That said, I really enjoyed McConaughey, why the fuck was Matt Damon even in the movie, scientifically/philosophically maybe not the most stimulating thing, but enjoyable. Visuals were definitely a treat on Imax tho
post #499 of 507

Nolan makes science fiction films, science fiction belongs to speculative fiction, which usually lies outside of the literary canon. I like Insomnia, I thought that was Nolan's best movie. Otherwise I think his work appeals to a much younger audience than we imagine, mainly people who are only into speculative fiction; fantasy, sci-fi, horror, etc, which means they're probably not intellectuals.

post #500 of 507
Quote:
Originally Posted by g transistor View Post

I think you definitely can equate Nolan's stuff to Transformers, etc; it's essentially the same stuff repackaged into a different form for a different audience. Nolan plays very well with the young-ish, "intellectual" crowd, you know, mod houses, wine, coffee shops, reading Proust in public. His work is Transformers for people who want to be taken seriously or at least want to come off as serious people. The Prestige and his earlier works aren't exceptions to this either-- they've always been action-thriller-dramas catered towards people who may like to dabble in overexposed "thinking" concepts filled with all the tropes you'd expect from an action film.

I'm not sure how I feel about this. On the one hand, I think there's a big difference between the intent of a movie like Transformers and your average Nolan film. To me, the point of a movie like Transformers is to create a product and surround that product with a brief fleeting intense media blitz in order to transfer wealth from consumers to studios/Bay/Wahlberg. Twenty years from now NOBODY is going to remember that this movie existed and certainly no one will still be watching it.

Whereas with Nolan, at least he has a story that he feels is important to get out of his head and put onto film. Are they good stories? That's for you to decide. Transformers has no interest in creating anything resembling a relevant narrative.

On the other hand, maybe I'm just trying to justify my own sense of self importance by disagreeing with your analysis.
Quote:
Originally Posted by g transistor View Post

Does that make him a bad filmmaker? I don't think so, I think he has his place in entertainment and can be highly enjoyable with the right mindset, and if you compare him to other mainstream acclaimed directors (Coens, PTA, etc etc) it's very easy to see what I'm talking about.

I don't understand why anyone would go to a Nolan movie expecting anything deeply philosophical explorations, but if you go in expecting an action movie with some neat little "huh interesting" tidbits then he's much more enjoyable.

I do agree with this, however.
post #501 of 507

Yes this is a music video so I guess it's not what's generally discussed here, but Shia LaBeouf is an actor that people have strong opinions about, so I figured I'd post it

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
I really like him in this
post #502 of 507
I'm resurrecting this to ask for film noir recs (loosely defined but decidedly pre-Chinatown).

I have seen and enjoyed (possibly missing some here):

Double Indemnity
Detour
The Big Sleep
The Maltese Falcon
Le Jour Se Leve & The Long Night
This Gun For Hire
Lady in the Lake
Out of the Past
Kiss Me Deadly
The Killing
The Set-Up
Shadow of a Doubt
Notorious
Strangers on a Train
The Third Man

I've got some more on the docket:

Sunset Boulevard
Murder, My Sweet
Shoot the Piano Player
The Wrong Man
Stranger on the Third Floor
D.O.A.
Detective Story
Gun Crazy
The Big Heat
In a Lonely Place
Night and the City
The Asphalt Jungle
The Desperate Hours
Touch of Evil (I may have seen this but all I remember now is the opening shot with the bomb in the trunk)


Does anyone have a recommendation that isn't above anywhere?
post #503 of 507

I wake up screaming, act of violence, the phenix city story. Your list is pretty good, but you need to take it up a notch.

post #504 of 507

If anyone enjoys Hal Hartley, Ned Rifle is a decent conclusion to the trilogy. Really dislike Aubrey Plaza though but everyone else was great as always, wish there was more of Parker Posey.

post #505 of 507

Saw Interstellar maybe three weeks ago; hadn't read anything about it and was expecting sci-fi. I thought it was 99% garbage as others have stated, so I won't bother with the criticism, but the remaining 1% fucked me up so hard I'm still reeling. Not entirely sure why, but I'm susceptible to the melodrama - and, I think, to polished cliché in general. I thought McConaughey was really, really good - and that he and Chastain did well together. The last movie I saw with McCaughneshirtless was a rom-com on an airplane maybe 8 years ago, so I was not expecting that (didn't even know he was in the film; for some reason I thought it was about George Clooney and aliens), and I don't think I've ever even seen Chastain before. I dunno. I don't watch a lot of movies. Anyway I wouldn't call it good but I thought it was...effective?

post #506 of 507
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldenTribe View Post

...Does anyone have a recommendation that isn't above anywhere?

The Sweet Smell of Success

post #507 of 507

I really liked Inherent Vice. It doesn't make much sense (slightly less sense than the book) but that doesn't really matter.

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