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Gustin - Official Affiliate Thread - Page 505

post #7561 of 10482

People choose to wear their clothing in different ways.  Some like their jeans loose and baggy.  Some like them precisely fitted.  Some like them tight.  Some like them VERY TIGHT.  Its fine and good that people wear their clothes differently, even the same item differently.

 

If a clothing manufacturer lists their sizing based on body measurements, the result is that they must base them on one particular fit.  Customers will inevitably complain that the item is tighter or looser than they desire because they are looking for a different fit.  And it gets complex fast with numerous measurements of different parts of the body.  Suits are traditionally sized in this way.  It works for suits because they are typically custom tailored, dry cleaned, not subject to shrinkage, and tend to have a particular intended fit.

 

The other way is that a manufacturer can list their sizing based on actual measurements of the clothing.  In this approach customers can best determine their size by measuring a piece of clothing that has a fit they wish to duplicate.  This is how Gustin does it.  I think its the right approach for them given the type of clothes and their business model.  This approach also allows easy measurement of the items pre-wash and pre-wear to confirm they are within spec prior to shipment by the manufacturer and after receipt by the customer.

 

I measure all my Gustin items before I wear or wash them to see if they are within a reasonable +/- 0.5" tolerance.  I have 20 or more items and 100% of them have been close to spec.

 

It wouldn't make any sense for a manufacturer like Gustin to try to pre-adjust sizing for shrinkage since shrinkage varies greatly based on fabric, how tight the item fits the customer, how the item is washed and dried, etc.  And Gustin items are often sold at particular sizes with new fabrics that have never been used before, so how could anyone accurately predict the shrinkage and post-wear/wash/dry sizing?  Its best for Gustin not to pretend they are psychic and instead make, measure, and mark their clothes at a new unwashed state.

 

I think Gustin has done it exactly right to clearly publish their sizing guide for all items including detailed dimensions, instructions for how to measure clothes with the fit you want to reproduce, and marking items based on clothes size instead of body size and when new not extrapolated after wear/wash/dry.

 

That being said, Gustin should be making quality control measurements on every single item prior to shipping so there should be zero stories of items arriving at a customer way out of spec.  There are such stories and no valid excuses for that.  But I do think its been fairly rare over the last 6-12 months based on my personal experience with numerous items.


Edited by mountainman3520 - 12/4/15 at 4:30pm
post #7562 of 10482
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fueco View Post
 

 

 

And yet half of the jeans I've received from Gustin have been off in the measurements. It does absolutely no good to provide measurements if you aren't going to QC things before they leave the factory...

 

Funny you bring up unsaforized. Why the hell should I have to order a 37 that will shrink to a 34? Why not just size the 34 up accordingly in the factory?

 

The fact that different brands of shoes are sized differently is EXACTLY what I'm complaining about here... A Brannock device is supposed to be THE way to measure feet, yet different brands still fuck up the sizing. This should not be the case. I should be able to reliably order a 9.5 Wide or a 10 Medium and get a shoe that fits (yes, my feet are slightly wider than a standard 9.5 (basically an E). 

 

Perhaps the broader issue is that manufacturing standard are simply not what they used to be. Maybe I should just stick to brands that actually have quality control.

 

 

Please forgive me, I'm not a shoe-sizing expert, but a Brannock device is a very inaccurate representation of the size (and more importantly the shape) of feet.  The proper size and FIT of a shoe depends on a multitude of factors such as: Style of shoe (i.e. open vs closed laced, lined or unlined, etc),  Shape of the Last the shoe was formed on (i.e. width of the forefoot, shape of arch, shape of the instep, etc.), Toe Geometry :

 

, and personal style preferences to name a few.

 

For myself, an 8D Allen Edmonds Dundee (a chukka on Allen Edmonds 511 last) fits great, but so does a 6.5EEE Allen Edmonds Spiaggia (on their 65 last) and 7.5E Neumok (also on the 65 last).  In the case of the 65 last, the Spiaggia is a choice of personal preference (I don't like space in front of my toes), but the Neumok is actually properly sized for the style envisioned by the designer.

In the case of the 511 last, that 8D works so well because the Dundee is a chukka, on a Leeds (511 last) I'd take an 7.5E.

 

As a side note a Brannock device will measure both your overall foot length and your ball to heel length. Based on which is larger, that is your "Brannock" size.  That doesn't mean that the maker of the shoe will add or subtract length from a size that is correct for you.  In other words, a half size (length) on the Brannock is 1/6 (one sixth) of an inch; when going from an 10 to an 11 did the maker add 1/3 of an inch to the front of the shoe (leaving the heal to ball unchanged) or to the back (which would move the placement of the arch) or spread it out over both?  One maker may do it one way and another totally differently.

 

Ultimately, use the Brannock as a guide, and try before you buy when possible. 

 

Link to Brannock's website:  http://brannock.com/pages/instructions-fitting-tips

post #7563 of 10482

How do Gustin Slim fit jeans compare to Uniqlo slim fit sizewise? I have Uniqlo slim fits in 32/32 (33/32 would probably be better) and after looking at the sizing charts I was thinking of buying Gustin slim fit jeans in size 34. According to size chart, waist of 34 is around the same as the uniqlo size 32, but not sure about thighs. Should I go for 35 for looser fit? 35 sounds huge... is that normal?

 

I am 180cm/83kg which converts to 5.9 feet and 183 lbs.

 

Thank you in advance and sorry for my mediocre english skills.

 

And what about the sneakers? I wear US9 with RW Iron Rangers and Adidas Stan Smiths and US9.5 in most of the dress shoes. So i should go for US9?

 

Black high-tops look awesome!

post #7564 of 10482
Quote:
Originally Posted by taduuu View Post

How do Gustin Slim fit jeans compare to Uniqlo slim fit sizewise? I have Uniqlo slim fits in 32/32 (33/32 would probably be better) and after looking at the sizing charts I was thinking of buying Gustin slim fit jeans in size 34. According to size chart, waist of 34 is around the same as the uniqlo size 32, but not sure about thighs. Should I go for 35 for looser fit? 35 sounds huge... is that normal?

I am 180cm/83kg which converts to 5.9 feet and 183 lbs.

Thank you in advance and sorry for my mediocre english skills.

measure your Uniqlo's and compare them to G's fit guide.

For reference, i'm 5'11, 175 lbs and have a 34.5" waist. I have four pairs of 34 slims from Gustin. G's fit guide has their 34 slims @ 34.5" -- only one pair of my 34 slims comes in at 34.5" and they're kinda loose. My other 3 pairs measure at 34" which is better because the waist will stretch out after a few wears. In short, it's better to have your jeans come in 0.5" under spec than exactly on spec in my opinion.
post #7565 of 10482
Quote:
Originally Posted by ace13x View Post
 

 

 

Please forgive me, I'm not a shoe-sizing expert, but a Brannock device is a very inaccurate representation of the size (and more importantly the shape) of feet.  The proper size and FIT of a shoe depends on a multitude of factors such as: Style of shoe (i.e. open vs closed laced, lined or unlined, etc),  Shape of the Last the shoe was formed on (i.e. width of the forefoot, shape of arch, shape of the instep, etc.), Toe Geometry :

 

, and personal style preferences to name a few.

 

For myself, an 8D Allen Edmonds Dundee (a chukka on Allen Edmonds 511 last) fits great, but so does a 6.5EEE Allen Edmonds Spiaggia (on their 65 last) and 7.5E Neumok (also on the 65 last).  In the case of the 65 last, the Spiaggia is a choice of personal preference (I don't like space in front of my toes), but the Neumok is actually properly sized for the style envisioned by the designer.

In the case of the 511 last, that 8D works so well because the Dundee is a chukka, on a Leeds (511 last) I'd take an 7.5E.

 

As a side note a Brannock device will measure both your overall foot length and your ball to heel length. Based on which is larger, that is your "Brannock" size.  That doesn't mean that the maker of the shoe will add or subtract length from a size that is correct for you.  In other words, a half size (length) on the Brannock is 1/6 (one sixth) of an inch; when going from an 10 to an 11 did the maker add 1/3 of an inch to the front of the shoe (leaving the heal to ball unchanged) or to the back (which would move the placement of the arch) or spread it out over both?  One maker may do it one way and another totally differently.

 

Ultimately, use the Brannock as a guide, and try before you buy when possible. 

 

Link to Brannock's website:  http://brannock.com/pages/instructions-fitting-tips

 

Great post.  I almost wrote something similar, but less well.  Thank you.

 

If the industry used ~10 different measurements to define the size of a foot and shoe then it may be possible to consistently define sizing across shoe styles and brands.  But then the number of dimension variations and complexity of measurement would be overwhelming.  So the industry greatly simplifies the problem by using only two measurements: length from back of heal to tip of longest toe, and width at the widest point.

 

Most of us find that our simplified size varies +/- 1 depending on the three dimensional shape of each particular last.

 

This leads to a great Idea for a future kickstarter company!  A shoe company that takes a 3D scan of each customer's actual feet and stores it.  Then 3D prints custom lasts for each customer and makes arrangement with well respected shoe manufacturers to have them make your shoes on your own custom lasts.  That would be a cool business and will likely exist at some point.  Someone do the feet of the world a favor and take this from concept to reality.

post #7566 of 10482
Quote:
Originally Posted by mountainman3520 View Post
 

 

This leads to a great Idea for a future kickstarter company!  A shoe company that takes a 3D scan of each customer's actual feet and stores it.  Then 3D prints custom lasts for each customer and makes arrangement with well respected shoe manufacturers to have them make your shoes on your own custom lasts.  That would be a cool business and will likely exist at some point.  Someone do the feet of the world a favor and take this from concept to reality.

 

That's an awesome idea. Race you to the copyright office...

post #7567 of 10482
Quote:
Originally Posted by mountainman3520 View Post
 

 

Great post.  I almost wrote something similar, but less well.  Thank you.

 

If the industry used ~10 different measurements to define the size of a foot and shoe then it may be possible to consistently define sizing across shoe styles and brands.  But then the number of dimension variations and complexity of measurement would be overwhelming.  So the industry greatly simplifies the problem by using only two measurements: length from back of heal to tip of longest toe, and width at the widest point.

 

Most of us find that our simplified size varies +/- 1 depending on the three dimensional shape of each particular last.

 

This leads to a great Idea for a future kickstarter company!  A shoe company that takes a 3D scan of each customer's actual feet and stores it.  Then 3D prints custom lasts for each customer and makes arrangement with well respected shoe manufacturers to have them make your shoes on your own custom lasts.  That would be a cool business and will likely exist at some point.  Someone do the feet of the world a favor and take this from concept to reality.

 

Thanks for the compliment, but I thought I rambled a little.  I find, that for me, the heal to ball measurement is much more important than heal to toe.  If I can get the placement of the arch to be OK, then it becomes more a matter of how much/little space in front of my toes I'm willing to accept.  I can usually fudge a little by going down a size and/or up a width. Most people don't bother to measure that part.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Robertson View Post
 

 

That's an awesome idea. Race you to the copyright office...

 

I thought of this too, the problem is you would still have issues with having to create multiple lasts out of your plastic foot duplicate.  Not all shoe/boots will take the same last (think about the last a Carmina shoe is formed on vs a Red Wing Beckman).   And you'd also have to make copies for each manufacturer, and then they would have to store them, and pull them when you want a shoe, put it on the lasting machine.... thats why totally bespoke costs $$$.  I think the only companies that would go for it are already well established bespoke shoemakers like Lobb, it would save them the hand carving of the bespoke last.

 

Still, the digital scanning part would be cool, since a manufacturer could then take the data, and compare it digitally to scans of there lasts, and determine which pre-made shoe/boot is right.  So for example, you could scan, save the data to a standard file format, upload it on say Red Wings website, it will spit out your best sizing for a Beckman, for an Iron Ranger for.... etc.  Then you could order your shoe.

 

I remember a LONG time ago Levis jeans had a full body scanner in some stores so women could get fitted for jeans.  Don't see them around now.

 

I also recall reading that some places have like a memory-foam/rubber thing (like when a dentist takes a mold of your teeth) they send you to stand in then you send them the mold back.  Can't recall where I saw that.

post #7568 of 10482
They are finally here! The white low everyone. Fit is pretty good, they said to order what you wear in converse so I did. May be a little tighter in the toe box than Chucks but that might just be the last but not enough to want a full size bigger. Construction is pretty solid, they look like they will last.



















post #7569 of 10482
All white every thing congrats Gooner.
post #7570 of 10482
Delivery this morning as well smile.gif

Horween color 8 low tops! Initial thoughts are the color 8 is gorgeous, nice depth of color and looks great. Shape and fit/feel is very similar to CP but maybe a tad more narrow. Size 8 length wise is identical to CP size 41 and EP size 8.5





Quick side-by-side-by-side with epaulet (brown) and CP (white)

post #7571 of 10482
Congrats JR Magat biggrin.gif
post #7572 of 10482
Update: I compared the last/fit to CP, laid one sole over the other, and they were basically IDENTICAL in shape.
post #7573 of 10482
Any of you gents can provide some feed back on fit for gustin slim button up shirts. Similar to jcrew slim fit dress shit? Any input would be help full. Looking to pull trigger on mossy hound tooth.
post #7574 of 10482
Quote:
Originally Posted by TtownMD View Post

Any of you gents can provide some feed back on fit for gustin slim button up shirts. Similar to jcrew slim fit dress shit? Any input would be help full. Looking to pull trigger on mossy hound tooth.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by TtownMD View Post

Congrats JR Magat biggrin.gif

 

Thanks!  And in my experience, I find Gustin button down shirts to fit slightly tighter than J.Crew slim.  I usually wear Gustin Classic Small and wear J.Crew Slim Small (which is a tad more snug/fitted).  I tried Gustin Slim small and it was just too tight around the chest for me.

post #7575 of 10482
JR Magat thank that helps a lot.
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