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Foster & Son/Henry Maxwell: Official Affiliate Thread - Page 50

post #736 of 1132
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by FredAstaire1899 View Post
 

I don't believe you'll find them in that picture above, but we believe you'll find them (or their dance version) in the movie clip in post #506 .

 

As one can see, Mr. Astaire preferred a wide variety of toe shapes, including soft chisel, classic round and pointed round.  I believe they were in accordance with what is most classic for the particular style, such as soft chisel on a full brogue spectator, round toe on a two tone derby, slightly pointed on a suede plain toe Balmoral.

 

FredAstaire1899,

 

As ever very informative and many thanks.

 

Foster & Son

post #737 of 1132
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by meister View Post


Spade soles ...very interesting ...keep it up!

 

 

The spade is lovely and quite unusual on a monk

Quote:
Originally Posted by meister View Post


Interesting seeing a modern sort of shape aka 80s onwards with 60s style lazy lacing.

 

And all that from a shoe made (probably) late 50's

 

Foster & Son

post #738 of 1132
Thread Starter 

Henry Maxwell vintage black derby boot

 

We think that this is a wonderful bespoke sample. Ten eyelet semi-brogue derby boot, absolutely fantastic.

 

 

 

 

 

Foster & Son

post #739 of 1132
Just an observation re your vintage collection. Rather than let these items dry out over the years, a simple application of leather conditioner - such as Pecards or Bick4 - would make a whole lot of difference to the preservation of these gems.
post #740 of 1132
Quote:
Originally Posted by meister View Post

Just an observation re your vintage collection. Rather than let these items dry out over the years, a simple application of leather conditioner - such as Pecards or Bick4 - would make a whole lot of difference to the preservation of these gems.

+1
post #741 of 1132
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by meister View Post

Just an observation re your vintage collection. Rather than let these items dry out over the years, a simple application of leather conditioner - such as Pecards or Bick4 - would make a whole lot of difference to the preservation of these gems.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by MoosicPa View Post


+1

 

Gents,

 

Very good point indeed and one that we've discussed before. Will gladly take this up again.

 

Foster & Son

post #742 of 1132
...
post #743 of 1132
Quote:
Originally Posted by FosterandSon View Post

Gentlemen,

Opinions very welcome on these vintage shoes.













Foster & Son

I have had the benefit of seeing this shoe in person. I don't particularly like the style of the shoe. What is fastastic about it are the materials and workmanship. The best bit is the way the heel cup and the heel fit together so closely. It is finished so that the heel cup looks like it "grew" out of the heel. Theere is hardly, if any, gap at all.

[To WSF] How was this achieved? I have not seen this on any modern bespoke shoes. (Which may be a reflection of my exposure, but I have seen G&G, Cleverley, John Lobb (London) samples up close and personal on a regular basis over many years, oh yes, and have a few examples of new WSF bespoke shoes). J
post #744 of 1132
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jamaican View Post


I have had the benefit of seeing this shoe in person. I don't particularly like the style of the shoe. What is fastastic about it are the materials and workmanship. The best bit is the way the heel cup and the heel fit together so closely. It is finished so that the heel cup looks like it "grew" out of the heel. Theere is hardly, if any, gap at all.

[To WSF] How was this achieved? I have not seen this on any modern bespoke shoes. (Which may be a reflection of my exposure, but I have seen G&G, Cleverley, John Lobb (London) samples up close and personal on a regular basis over many years, oh yes, and have a few examples of new WSF bespoke shoes). J

 

jamaican,

 

I've just asked Emma in the workshop about this and she explained that it is due to a number of factors, particularly the heel shape of the client (in this case, as it's a sample, it was probably made this way to show that it could be done) influencing the last design so that the transition from upper to heel is seamless. It can't be done this way for everyone without ruining the proportions of the heel. In fact, she showed me a couple of bespoke shoes in the workshop that were very similar.

 

Foster & Son

post #745 of 1132
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by VegTan View Post

e113e7f1.png

Why is the tongue faded partially? If it isn't faded, how did you redye the upper without redyeing the white stitching?

 

Veg Tan,

 

Just had a look again at the shoe and it would appear that the dye has rubbed into the leather above it and it is nowhere near as noticeable irl as it is in the picture.

 

Foster & Son

post #746 of 1132
There are a couple of things with this shoe that are not typical of the way modern bespoke shoes are made:


The ‘stay-stitching’ (preventing the quarters to be ripped off) is done by machine. These days, virtually all English bespoke shoes will have that stay stitch done by hand, some 4 or 5 stitches across in a heavier thread, introducing a different texture, sometimes even in a contrasting colour.



It’s rather like the cut-through sleeve buttonhole in a bespoke coat. Insiders will know what it indicates.



The eyelets have metal reinforcements fitted:



Bespoke shoes (unlike ready-to-wear) usually shun those rivets and do not have reinforcement that can be seen from the outside. It gets reinforced with tape placed between the upper- and the lining leather.

Just a couple of useless observations. shog[1].gifshog[1].gifshog[1].gif
post #747 of 1132

Just wanted to say what an unexpected privilege it was to be shown around the shop by Frank when I popped in for some shoe bags this afternoon. Seeing and handling the vintage bespoke shoes that have been posted in this thread was an experience I would recommend to anyone on the forum, likewise the lasts and leather collection backstairs. Has to be the most interesting shop on Jermyn Street.

 

Many thanks also to George for the bags and for helping me try on a few of the sale pairs (still plenty of good deals to be had).

post #748 of 1132
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by atia2 View Post
 

Just wanted to say what an unexpected privilege it was to be shown around the shop by Frank when I popped in for some shoe bags this afternoon. Seeing and handling the vintage bespoke shoes that have been posted in this thread was an experience I would recommend to anyone on the forum, likewise the lasts and leather collection backstairs. Has to be the most interesting shop on Jermyn Street.

 

Many thanks also to George for the bags and for helping me try on a few of the sale pairs (still plenty of good deals to be had).

 

You're really kind, thank you very much. If anyone wants to come in and have a look at our old, and new, vintage shoes please do, you'll be very welcome anytime.

 

Foster & Son

post #749 of 1132
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bengal-stripe View Post

There are a couple of things with this shoe that are not typical of the way modern bespoke shoes are made:


The ‘stay-stitching’ (preventing the quarters to be ripped off) is done by machine. These days, virtually all English bespoke shoes will have that stay stitch done by hand, some 4 or 5 stitches across in a heavier thread, introducing a different texture, sometimes even in a contrasting colour.



It’s rather like the cut-through sleeve buttonhole in a bespoke coat. Insiders will know what it indicates.



The eyelets have metal reinforcements fitted:



Bespoke shoes (unlike ready-to-wear) usually shun those rivets and do not have reinforcement that can be seen from the outside. It gets reinforced with tape placed between the upper- and the lining leather.

Just a couple of useless observations. shog[1].gifshog[1].gifshog[1].gif

 

Bengal-stripe, what a wonderful source of information you are! Absolutely fabulous!

post #750 of 1132
Quote:
Originally Posted by FosterandSon View Post

Just had a look again at the shoe and it would appear that the dye has rubbed into the leather above it and it is nowhere near as noticeable irl as it is in the picture.

Foster & Son

Thank you so much for your time.
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