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Foster & Son/Henry Maxwell: Official Affiliate Thread - Page 21

post #301 of 1072
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by FredAstaire1899 View Post
 

Dear Foster and Son,

 

Here is a link to a pair of Fred's dancing shoes http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2012/04/fred-astaires-dancing-shoes.html and an expanded picture http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/.a/6a01156f47abbe970c0167654108e4970b-pi .

 

Another interesting point, given Prince Albert slippers have even thinner soles than formal shoes, how were the soles originally secured to the upper?  Perhaps the soles were/still are too thin to support a stitch to the upper?

 

Kind Regards.

 

Very interesting, we'll have a look at both these questions and seek Terry's view.

post #302 of 1072
Is this a Foster & Son satchel? If so, can you provide any details and pictures from different angles and of the inside of the bag...thank you.

post #303 of 1072
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by woolymammoth View Post

Is this a Foster & Son satchel? If so, can you provide any details and pictures from different angles and of the inside of the bag...thank you.

we'll get back to you as soon as we can

post #304 of 1072
Quote:
Originally Posted by FredAstaire1899 View Post

This brings up a related point, how were traditional dancing/ evening shoes made before they could be fully cemented/ blake stitched?  I ask this as Fred often appeared in scenes wearing visibly welted shoes (close up shots), and would transition to the dance scenes.  However, pictures of the dance shoes show no sole protruding from the edge of the upper, like a modern cemented formal shoe.  They possibly could have used a blake machine from the early 20th century onwards, and thus on Fred's shoes.

They could have been "pump stitched". Which is a lot like blake except done by hand and nearly a lost art due to the necessity of working down deep inside the forepart of the shoe, blind, as who should say.
post #305 of 1072
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by FosterandSon View Post
 

we'll get back to you as soon as we can

 

woolymammoth,

 

It is a Foster's bag though, unfortunately, we are currently out of stock. We will be receiving more stock soon and we will make sure to post some detailed photographs.

 

Foster & Son

post #306 of 1072
Quote:
Originally Posted by FredAstaire1899 View Post

Dear Foster and Son,

Here is a link to a pair of Fred's dancing shoes http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/museum/2012/04/fred-astaires-dancing-shoes.html and an expanded picture http://blog.fidmmuseum.org/.a/6a01156f47abbe970c0167654108e4970b-pi .

Here is another pair.
Quote:
http://entertainment.ha.com/c/item.zx?saleNo=7081&lotIdNo=80001

A Fred Astaire Pair of Tap Shoes from "You'll Never Get Rich." Columbia, 1941. Made of brown leather, black leather
soles, stacked heels, metal taps on heels and toes, inside right lining stamped "Designed and / Hand-Sewn / Expressly for / I.
Magnin & Co.,"
inside left lining stamped "I. Magnin & Co. / Los Angeles" and "Fred Astaire" (though very faint now), both side linings have a black fountain pen ink handwritten annotation reading "F. Astaire / 41 / 40025," both bottom linings further signed in black felt-tip ink by the star himself "Fred Astaire / 40;" included are two wooden shoe trees and two orange shoe covers from the famous Beverly Hills store, Carroll & Co.; worn by the dancer as he portrayed "Robert Curtis" in the musical that co-starred Rita Hayworth and Robert Benchley. (Please note these shoes are in standard worn condition due to use.)

Men's Size 8N

http://dyn2.heritagestatic.com/lf?set=path%5B1%2F0%2F2%2F9%2F6%2F10296445%5D%2Csizedata%5B3000x3000%5D&call=url%5Bfile%3Aproduct.chain%5D
http://dyn1.heritagestatic.com/lf?set=path%5B1%2F0%2F2%2F6%2F5%2F10265227%5D%2Csizedata%5B3000x3000%5D&call=url%5Bfile%3Aproduct.chain%5D
http://dyn3.heritagestatic.com/lf?set=path%5B1%2F0%2F2%2F6%2F5%2F10265220%5D%2Csizedata%5B3000x3000%5D&call=url%5Bfile%3Aproduct.chain%5D
http://dyn1.heritagestatic.com/lf?set=path%5B1%2F0%2F2%2F6%2F5%2F10265224%5D%2Csizedata%5B3000x3000%5D&call=url%5Bfile%3Aproduct.chain%5D
http://dyn1.heritagestatic.com/lf?set=path%5B1%2F0%2F2%2F6%2F5%2F10265254%5D%2Csizedata%5B3000x3000%5D&call=url%5Bfile%3Aproduct.chain%5D
http://dyn1.heritagestatic.com/lf?set=path%5B1%2F0%2F2%2F6%2F5%2F10265236%5D%2Csizedata%5B3000x3000%5D&call=url%5Bfile%3Aproduct.chain%5D
http://dyn3.heritagestatic.com/lf?set=path%5B1%2F0%2F2%2F6%2F5%2F10265253%5D%2Csizedata%5B3000x3000%5D&call=url%5Bfile%3Aproduct.chain%5D
post #307 of 1072
Quote:
Originally Posted by FosterandSon View Post

woolymammoth,

It is a Foster's bag though, unfortunately, we are currently out of stock. We will be receiving more stock soon and we will make sure to post some detailed photographs.

Foster & Son

Thank you.
post #308 of 1072
Thread Starter 

Final Call - price drops on Alfred Sargent Shoes including Exclusive models, now £249 including VAT

 

We are reaching the last few of our Alfred Sargent stock shoes. Please email us at shoemakers@foster.co.uk, to check on size, or PM us for more details.

 

All shoes are UK and F width, please give your Styleforum ID when ordering. The price is now £249 a pair including UK VAT and delivery, compared with the usual £385 ticket price.

 

 

 

From left to right: Hunt Brogue Black, Adelaide Brogue Black, Adelaide Brogue Mahogany, Hunt Brogue Mahogany, Armfield Cap Oxford Mahogany

 

 

109 last sole

 

 

99 last sole

 

 

Hunt, Mahogany and Black

 

 

 

Armfield, Mahogany

 

 

Adelaide, Black

 

 

Adelaide, Mahogany

 

 

Waist detail 109 last

 

 

Waist detail 99 last

 

Foster & Son

post #309 of 1072
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


They could have been "pump stitched". Which is a lot like blake except done by hand and nearly a lost art due to the necessity of working down deep inside the forepart of the shoe, blind, as who should say.

 

DWFII,

 

Just checked with the guys in the workshop and they've confirmed this - both "pump stitched" and "nearly a lost art" elements. I will try to find a pair of pump stitched shoes in the archive and, if successful, will photograph and post.

 

Foster & Son

post #310 of 1072
Quote:
Originally Posted by FosterandSon View Post

DWFII,

Just checked with the guys in the workshop and they've confirmed this - both "pump stitched" and "nearly a lost art" elements. I will try to find a pair of pump stitched shoes in the archive and, if successful, will photograph and post.

Foster & Son

cheers.gif

If I'm not mistaken this technique is also known as "channel-stitching."

Made a pair of pump-sttiched / channel-stitched shoes for my wife a couple of years ago. They turned out pretty nice, better than I had any reason to hope for. I was not trained to do that kind of work (who is??!) and know of only one person on this side of the pond (my particular friend--DA Saguto at Colonial Williamsburg) who might have been. So, I was kind of making it up as I went along.

I was going to post a few photos of that pair of shoes but I suspect that they would be OT in this thread. cool.gif
post #311 of 1072
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


cheers.gif

If I'm not mistaken this technique is also known as "channel-stitching."

Made a pair of pump-sttiched / channel-stitched shoes for my wife a couple of years ago. They turned out pretty nice, better than I had any reason to hope for. I was not trained to do that kind of work (who is??!) and know of only one person on this side of the pond (my particular friend--DA Saguto at Colonial Williamsburg) who might have been. So, I was kind of making it up as I went along.

I was going to post a few photos of that pair of shoes but I suspect that they would be OT in this thread. cool.gif

 

If I may go off topic a little farther, does this imply that modern ladies high heels could be made with the sole stitched to the upper, albeit with a very slightly thicker outsole?  Additionally, given that the mechanics of walking in such shoes are vastly different to the natural human motion and thus would put different strains on the shoes' construction, would such a technique by greatly beneficial?

post #312 of 1072
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


cheers.gif

If I'm not mistaken this technique is also known as "channel-stitching."

Made a pair of pump-sttiched / channel-stitched shoes for my wife a couple of years ago. They turned out pretty nice, better than I had any reason to hope for. I was not trained to do that kind of work (who is??!) and know of only one person on this side of the pond (my particular friend--DA Saguto at Colonial Williamsburg) who might have been. So, I was kind of making it up as I went along.

I was going to post a few photos of that pair of shoes but I suspect that they would be OT in this thread. cool.gif

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by FredAstaire1899 View Post
 

 

If I may go off topic a little farther, does this imply that modern ladies high heels could be made with the sole stitched to the upper, albeit with a very slightly thicker outsole?  Additionally, given that the mechanics of walking in such shoes are vastly different to the natural human motion and thus would put different strains on the shoes' construction, would such a technique by greatly beneficial?

 

DWFII,

 

Please post the pictures, we'd love to see them.

 

 

FredAstaire1899,

 

Until fairly recently Caroline Groves - a bespoke and couture woman's shoe maker - worked from our premises in Jermyn St. I interviewed her recently about her line of work and she was truly fascinating. Most of her shoes are hand-welted and hand stitched but she makes some shoes with soles so thin that they are glued (given the purpose they are put to and the infrequency of wearing this doesn't seem to cause any problems - they're red carpet shoes really). But there was one shoe that really turned heads.

 

CREATOR: gd-jpeg v1.0 (using IJG JPEG v62), quality = 90

 

You can see many others at http://www.carolinegroves.co.uk/.

post #313 of 1072
Quote:
Originally Posted by FredAstaire1899 View Post

If I may go off topic a little farther, does this imply that modern ladies high heels could be made with the sole stitched to the upper, albeit with a very slightly thicker outsole?  Additionally, given that the mechanics of walking in such shoes are vastly different to the natural human motion and thus would put different strains on the shoes' construction, would such a technique by greatly beneficial?

Thicker and stiffer, than most fashion conscious young women would care to be seen in, I suspect.

And all else being equal--ie. the quality of the materials in the rest of the shoe--it would not be financially feasible. IOW, the whole basis of women's shoes is that the cheapest, quickest and most convenient materials and methods are used to yield the greatest return / profit. Having a highly skilled, highly experienced, highly trained (all that costs money to create, as well) shoemaker spend a couple hours of time (at a relatively high wage) would not make sense.

If women's shoes were made like men's shoes...as they were made 100 years ago, as a few high end bespoke makers still make them...then it might start to make sense. So, yes, it could be done but it's a whole different paradigm / ball game / philosophy at that point.
post #314 of 1072
Quote:
Originally Posted by FosterandSon View Post



DWFII,

Please post the pictures, we'd love to see them.


FredAstaire1899,

Until fairly recently Caroline Groves - a bespoke and couture woman's shoe maker - worked from our premises in Jermyn St. I interviewed her recently about her line of work and she was truly fascinating. Most of her shoes are hand-welted and hand stitched but she makes some shoes with soles so thin that they are glued (given the purpose they are put to and the infrequency of wearing this doesn't seem to cause any problems - they're red carpet shoes really). But there was one shoe that really turned heads.

You can see many others at http://www.carolinegroves.co.uk/.

Thanks for that link. I really admire the balmorals and the mcaffees. You just got to respect that kind of work right down to the wood...not plastic...heels.

And thank you for the generosity in allowing me to post photos in this thread. I don't do women's shoes as a general rule (wife is, of course an exception). I don't have the eye or the talent for it. Certainly not to compare with Ms Groves.

So FWIW...(my wife designed and constructed the upper, I just lasted and bottomed them)...





post #315 of 1072
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


Thanks for that link. I really admire the balmorals and the mcaffees. You just got to respect that kind of work right down to the wood...not plastic...heels.

And thank you for the generosity in allowing me to post photos in this thread. I don't do women's shoes as a general rule (wife is, of course an exception). I don't have the eye or the talent for it. Certainly not to compare with Ms Groves.

So FWIW...(my wife designed and constructed the upper, I just lasted and bottomed them)...





 

Absolutely wonderful

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