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Folded Up Shirt P0rn - Page 281

post #4201 of 4528
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shirtmaven View Post

NOBD
I find bias split yoke on a large gingham shirt to be very distracting

Never thought about it, but I see what you mean. I think my other gingham's don't have it. Default construction for this maker.
post #4202 of 4528
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shirtmaven View Post

NOBD
I find bias split yoke on a large gingham shirt to be very distracting

I'll never be able not to notice this again.
post #4203 of 4528
Quote:
Originally Posted by marcodalondra View Post

Charvet as well as virtually every Neapolitan shirtmaker I have seen have staggered seam as you called them. as I understand this is not done because of the bouncing cloth but first it means that the sleeves have been attached to the closed body and second it reflects that the body side seams centre needs to be slightly behind the sleeve seam centre.

It really just depends on the order the shirt is sewn. If the sleeves and the body are closed separately, and then the sleeves are sewn into the body, the side seams are staggered because it would be hard to sew through that big lump of cloth. If the sleeves and the body are attached together first, then the sides are closed from the cuff to the hem in one continuous operation.

The latter method is much harder to sew with an ordinary sewing machine, so it's no wonder you see fewer non-mass-manufactured shirts with it. It's also much more tolerant of imprecise cutting, because the sewer can just stretch either the sleeve or the body to make it match the other. Not that they can't do it if the shirt is open, but it's easier. It sounds like it should be harder overall to sew the shirt this way, but it's not because when closing the whole shirt you'd have to sew "inside" the sleeve. Hard to explain but very unpleasant. Basically the person sewing the shirt has to scrunch up the whole shirt as they sew it.

I think the bigger makers use a special foot or jig to sew those tiny, continuous side seams, though I'm not exactly sure how it works.
post #4204 of 4528
Quote:
Originally Posted by NOBD View Post

Never thought about it, but I see what you mean. I think my other gingham's don't have it. Default construction for this maker.

It is the way tailors address one shoulder that drops lower than the other. Split in the back or wrinkles and folds over one shoulder. Pick your poison.

Rob
post #4205 of 4528
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ataturk View Post

It really just depends on the order the shirt is sewn. If the sleeves and the body are closed separately, and then the sleeves are sewn into the body, the side seams are staggered because it would be hard to sew through that big lump of cloth. If the sleeves and the body are attached together first, then the sides are closed from the cuff to the hem in one continuous operation.

The latter method is much harder to sew with an ordinary sewing machine, so it's no wonder you see fewer non-mass-manufactured shirts with it. It's also much more tolerant of imprecise cutting, because the sewer can just stretch either the sleeve or the body to make it match the other. Not that they can't do it if the shirt is open, but it's easier. It sounds like it should be harder overall to sew the shirt this way, but it's not because when closing the whole shirt you'd have to sew "inside" the sleeve. Hard to explain but very unpleasant. Basically the person sewing the shirt has to scrunch up the whole shirt as they sew it.

I think the bigger makers use a special foot or jig to sew those tiny, continuous side seams, though I'm not exactly sure how it works.
I have seen different operations at work. The industrial machine that close most RTW shirt is different from the regular sewing machine used in artisanal/high quality operations. The latter use something called a flat felling foot to do the second pass. Even if the open sleeve is attached to the body first and then closed in one long seam, the bouncing will be encountered where the sleevehead has been flat felled around the armscye. But again if you look at where the body should close under the arm area an where the sleeve middle point is when attached properly, you will need to have a naturally staggered seam to ensure the sleeve fit straight
post #4206 of 4528
Quote:
Originally Posted by rob View Post

It is the way tailors address one shoulder that drops lower than the other. Split in the back or wrinkles and folds over one shoulder. Pick your poison.

Rob

Yes, I know. I was referring to what Ich_Dien is referring to. smile.gif
post #4207 of 4528
Quote:
Originally Posted by poorsod View Post

Does Mary speak English? I'm planning to be in Milan next year and wondering if I should make a trip to Turin. Her shirts are the closest I've seen to the old Lanvin.

Andrey do you have a picture of the armpit area of the shirt? The Lanvin shirts I've seem have a staggered seam at the armpit to avoid the little knot of cloth.

Mary speaks almost no English.

It's still not terribly hard to do a fitting. You can always mine and guess at the French / Italian for whatever you want.

If you're not going to be there very long, I'd actually recommend holding off. Even after the basted fitting, there were still some changes to be made and unless you could do a basted + advanced fitting in that time, I don't know if you'll be especially happy.

Great construction though and she's gotten the fit to around 90%.
post #4208 of 4528
Quote:
Originally Posted by NOBD View Post

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post #4209 of 4528
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post #4210 of 4528
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cantabrigian View Post

Mary speaks almost no English.

It's still not terribly hard to do a fitting. You can always mine and guess at the French / Italian for whatever you want.

If you're not going to be there very long, I'd actually recommend holding off. Even after the basted fitting, there were still some changes to be made and unless you could do a basted + advanced fitting in that time, I don't know if you'll be especially happy.

Great construction though and she's gotten the fit to around 90%.

I'll be in Milan for about a week. Would that be enough time for the 2 fittings?
post #4211 of 4528
N and manchambo, superb.
post #4212 of 4528
Quote:
Originally Posted by poorsod View Post

I'll be in Milan for about a week. Would that be enough time for the 2 fittings?

No idea really. I can PM you her email.

Not sure how keen you are to see Turin multiple times but it might be possible. She, very sensibly, has you fill in a spreadsheet of measurements before meeting so that a whole visit isn't wasted on 10 minutes with a tape measure.
post #4213 of 4528
Cant - have you received a finished shirt from Mary yet?
post #4214 of 4528
I've gotten four now I think. Basted fitting then first shirt. Then the others a month or two later.

I've been meaning to do a proper photo shoot.
post #4215 of 4528

Nice. Didn't you use Siviglia as well? How would you compare the two?

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