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Classic Navy Blue Overcoat -- Pocket Styles?

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
I'm going to do something different for a change and that's purchase a new coat before its cold out. That said, I've identified a few possible options and I would like a little feedback on pocket styles only. Is there anything that shouldn't be done? I'm not a fan of patch pockets on sport coats, but I very much like the flap patch pocket style of this overcoat:
http://www.farfetch.com/shopping/men/ermenegildo-zegna-single-breasted-coat-item-10496644.aspx


I also would like to hear opinions of this style:
http://www.farfetch.com/shopping/men/t-by-alexander-wang-single-breasted-coat-item-10530544.aspx
Reserved for raincoats only? I've always favored this style since I'm 5'9 and felt that the vertical line of the pocket is better for a guy of my height and on a long coat, but I've grown a little tired of this style pocket?

Lastly, I found one with the more standard flap pocket and 2nd right side ticket pocket.

My predicament is that I'm in NYC and I can often wind up on 5th Ave and 59th and then Ludlow Street all in the same day. The flapped patch pocket style is appealing to me for that reason, since it's not so (just got out of a board meeting) straight. It kind of has that duffle coat vibe, but with proper notch collar. I understand shade of blue and texture of material is relevant. Everything I'm looking at is Italian wool. I primarily wear dark denim (2-3 days) and a few different shades of gray cord, wool, flannel, trousers in the winter. Not much tan or khaki. Gives an idea of how it will be worn. Suits of course, are a given, but I find that part easier than essentially dressing down and overcoat and I'm probably a one day a week suit guy in the winter.

The two coats linked are not the specific coats I'm interested in, but somewhat representative of the look or more so, the pocket style I'm curious to know about.

Thanks.
Edited by super1flavor - 9/29/13 at 12:58pm
post #2 of 14

The way you are planning to wear the coat i think you could definitely utilise either style, both are slightly less formal than standard flap pockets. The patch flaps aren't to my taste for an overcoat but i like the vertical style and think these are most practical

post #3 of 14
The thing about flaps is you can always tuck them in. Unless they're on a patch pocket (such as a polo coat) of course, then things look a little weird.

As for the Zegna coat you linked to, it wants to be a polo coat / ulster with those pockets yet unfortunately lacks any of the other nice features of a ulster / polo (belted back, DB, Peaked revers, turn back cuffs) and therefore looks strange.
post #4 of 14
Thread Starter 
Exactly the type of response I was looking for. It's just one opinion, but points out a few things I did not consider and this I feel, is the value of this conversation. I see a lot of overcoats online right now and I poured over the Satorialist photos ans elsewhere and I'm really hung up on what to purchase. I'm leaning towards a Cantarelli coat at Bergdorf with with 2 straight flap pockets and a second smaller "ticket" pocket on the right side.
post #5 of 14
Thread Starter 
Thanks. Seems like we're 0-2 on the flapped patch pocket style. Good feedback.
post #6 of 14
When I hear the term "vibe"in the context of coat selection., I wince.
I think that you are overthinking this. Unless you wear something really
inappropriate - a Marmot Down Jacket, for example, you probably won't be noticed.
I think you should consider more classical styles. Your examples look too "fashionable"
to me and not very warm. Here are some ideas from that redoubt of classical styles, O Connells:

http://www.oconnellsclothing.com/home.php?cat=377
post #7 of 14
Thread Starter 
Thank you very much for the feedback and for the link. It certainly puts things in perspective a little better.

I do however, have two things I need to say in response. This is the 2nd time in the last couple weeks that you've responded to my posts challenging the "mental" aspect of things and I don't know what that is about. I'll admit my chukka boot post last time didn't use the best choice of wording. Wouldn't you know, after that post, I went out and purchased, guess what? 2 pairs of Church's Ryder 3 chukkas. Turns out the chukka wasn't the issue, it was the lasts and soles I had been buying in the past. The dainite sole on the Ryder is very comfortable and attractive. Very masculine and proper for NYC, where soles burn out fast. That was the feedback I was seeking last time. 2) you state "overthinking" and perhaps I am, but I am a clear cut example of seeing something and buying it for $1500 and then realizing that one or two details, such as what ich-dien referenced, could make or break a "style" of coat.

I agree with you, my goal is to stay as far away from anything "fashionable."
post #8 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by super1flavor View Post

Thank you very much for the feedback and for the link. It certainly puts things in perspective a little better.

I do however, have two things I need to say in response. This is the 2nd time in the last couple weeks that you've responded to my posts challenging the "mental" aspect of things and I don't know what that is about. I'll admit my chukka boot post last time didn't use the best choice of wording. Wouldn't you know, after that post, I went out and purchased, guess what? 2 pairs of Church's Ryder 3 chukkas. Turns out the chukka wasn't the issue, it was the lasts and soles I had been buying in the past. The dainite sole on the Ryder is very comfortable and attractive. Very masculine and proper for NYC, where soles burn out fast. That was the feedback I was seeking last time. 2) you state "overthinking" and perhaps I am, but I am a clear cut example of seeing something and buying it for $1500 and then realizing that one or two details, such as what ich-dien referenced, could make or break a "style" of coat.

I agree with you, my goal is to stay as far away from anything "fashionable."

I stand corrected. I am only (over) reacting to what I perceive to be a higher than average
emotional component when you experess yourself on clothing choices.
post #9 of 14
Try a different approach. Determine the coat style/silhouette you want first. DB or SB then what degree of formality or how dressy or casual you want the coat to be. Seems like four out of five days you are wearing this with casual clothing.

If you want a dressier coat it should be a bit longer than a casual styled coat. If it is dressier you want notch or peak lapels and with the peak you want flap pockets.

If you want a more casual coat you could wear it shorter if it is more fitted. With a fitted close to the body cut, flap or slash pockets. Patch won't look right.

If the casual style is full and a looser fit, wear it a bit longer with patch pockets, framed patch, post box, (pick a name here for this style) will look appropriate and would look better with an ulster type collar.

If you walk a lot, an Ulster that crosses over and buttons up will protect you more. If you just want to look good, get something dressier and wear a beautiful scarf.

I didn't like either coat that you linked in your first post.

The Zegna coat has the framed flap/patch pocket because the coat is partially lined and utilizing this style pocket does away with the inside pocket bag and reduces other amounts of work when constructing the coat. Coat was probably styled this way more out of necessity than pure design.

Slash pockets are most accommodating if you keep your hands in your pockets and don't wear gloves. These would be the most pedestrian as they are common on rain coats.

You would be best served with a casual looking tweedy/textured type of cloth and another dark dressy topcoat in grey or navy. Hard to nail both looks in one coat.

Also consider dark brown or a carmel/vicuna shade of brown in what ever style you might find.

Bottom line; the fit, shape, length of the coat and lapels determine the style more than pockets and the pockets should follow and reinforce the design intent of the silhouette.
post #10 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Despos View Post

Try a different approach. Determine the coat style/silhouette you want first. DB or SB then what degree of formality or how dressy or casual you want the coat to be. Seems like four out of five days you are wearing this with casual clothing.

If you want a dressier coat it should be a bit longer than a casual styled coat. If it is dressier you want notch or peak lapels and with the peak you want flap pockets.

If you want a more casual coat you could wear it shorter if it is more fitted. With a fitted close to the body cut, flap or slash pockets. Patch won't look right.

If the casual style is full and a looser fit, wear it a bit longer with patch pockets, framed patch, post box, (pick a name here for this style) will look appropriate and would look better with an ulster type collar.

If you walk a lot, an Ulster that crosses over and buttons up will protect you more. If you just want to look good, get something dressier and wear a beautiful scarf.

I didn't like either coat that you linked in your first post.

The Zegna coat has the framed flap/patch pocket because the coat is partially lined and utilizing this style pocket does away with the inside pocket bag and reduces other amounts of work when constructing the coat. Coat was probably styled this way more out of necessity than pure design.

Slash pockets are most accommodating if you keep your hands in your pockets and don't wear gloves. These would be the most pedestrian as they are common on rain coats.

You would be best served with a casual looking tweedy/textured type of cloth and another dark dressy topcoat in grey or navy. Hard to nail both looks in one coat.

Also consider dark brown or a carmel/vicuna shade of brown in what ever style you might find.

Bottom line; the fit, shape, length of the coat and lapels determine the style more than pockets and the pockets should follow and reinforce the design intent of the silhouette.
I

I'm actually thinking about making up an Ulster with "raincoat" pockets. I've seen a number of examples in old movies (eg, The 39 Steps) and I like to put my hands in my coat pockets. Do you think it looks incongruous?
Edited by etkl - 10/2/13 at 7:26am
post #11 of 14
I have a "great coat" in this model by Invertere. Mine is gray melton and doesn't have an alpaca lining.
It is more formal than the tweed version. I wore it when I lived in Chicago on ultra cold days. It's is
probably overkill for New York. Unfortunately Invertere went out of business a few years ago.

http://www.oconnellsclothing.com/images/P/oconnells-greatcoat-ol-18523p.jpg
post #12 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by comrade View Post

I have a "great coat" in this model by Invertere. Mine is gray melton and doesn't have an alpaca lining.
It is more formal than the tweed version. I wore it when I lived in Chicago on ultra cold days. It's is
probably overkill for New York.
Unfortunately Invertere went out of business a few years ago.

http://www.oconnellsclothing.com/images/P/oconnells-greatcoat-ol-18523p.jpg

I don't know about that. In most of the time frame since 2001, New York City, New York is just as cold as or colder than Chicago, Illinois in the winter as often as Chicago is colder than New York City.

You must have moved from Chicago to Menlo Park, California before 2001, comrade. Otherwise, you would know that during most of the past 12 years, New York City winters are the same as Chicago winters always have been. Before 2001, yes you are right about Chicago winters being colder and stormier than New York City winters.
post #13 of 14
Quote:
I'm actually thinking about making up an Ulster with "raincoat" pockets. I've seen a number of examples in old movies (eg, The Thirty Nine Steps) and I like to put my hands in my coat pockets. Do you think it looks incongruous?

If it worked for Hitchcock it should be alright for you.
post #14 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Despos View Post

If it worked for Hitchcock it should be alright for you.

Thankfully it was Robert Donat who was wearing it, not Hitchcock.
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