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career advice

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
I'm 23. Graduated from the university last year w/ a bachelors in business adm. I have minimal work experience (only 1 real job and 1 legal internship) . I took my lsat and got into a a few law schools. Ended up going into a 3rd tier w/ half tuition. However i felt like this was not the right decision and i might be making a huge mistake. I was able to drop out in time to get 90% of my money back. I kind of feel like a quitter but at the same time i feel like a huge weight has been lifted off my shoulders.

So to get to the point, what should i do next? I'm leaning towards a masters just because i dont want to risk settling and not going back to school, but at the same time I feel like i need some experience. However i dont know what kind of job i can get with such a vague & mediocre degree.

As for me, I prefer to be outdoors & travel than stuck in a cubicle & im not terrible at math.
post #2 of 18

http://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=130103 ;)

post #3 of 18
Getting a random masters degree because you don't know what to do is a great way to spend the rest of your life paying down student loans on a useless degree.

If what you want to do requires a masters then so be it--but the purpose of school is not to stall the real world.
post #4 of 18
What is with all the cubicle fear? There was a time when people had their heads screwed-on right and understood: (1) work is something you get paid for, not a fun hobby, and (2) an office job is generally far preferable to manual labor.
post #5 of 18
You're so old an wise foo.
post #6 of 18
I am ancient relative to most of this board.
post #7 of 18
Yea seriously mrscrouge, harden the fuck up. Take a cubicle job - you have a long life of making threads about decorating your apartment and bitching about bespoke tailors stealing your money ahead of you!

OP: A master's in.. .what?
post #8 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by aravenel View Post

Getting a random masters degree because you don't know what to do is a great way to spend the rest of your life paying down student loans on a useless degree.

If what you want to do requires a masters then so be it--but the purpose of school is not to stall the real world.

 

^^ Agreed..... getting education for the sake of it does not make a lot of sense.

 

 

 

 

What exactly do you want to do with your life?? If you want to work for someone else for the rest of your life then go back to school and get your masters. If you plan on starting a company and building your own dream, then your education means squat. Education does not determine your ability to succeed as a business owner and entrepreneur.... all you need for that is hard work, a dream and never give up.

 

IMO too many young people spend time getting educated because they think it's the thing to do. Decide how you want to live your life, find someone who lives that way and follow in their footsteps and try your very best to get mentorship from them.

post #9 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrscrouge View Post

As for me, I prefer to be outdoors & travel than stuck in a cubicle

Wow, how interesting. I don't think I've ever met anyone who prefers leisure activities to working.

Seriously, what is so hard or awful about finding a job and earning money while you're figuring out what to do with your life? Why is going to school again and not working so much more likely to lead to ultimate happiness than spending that same time working, earning some cash, enjoying life as a self-sufficient person and maybe actually learning something about yourself in the process?

Do you think that everyone who came before you emerged from college as a fully formed human who knew exactly what they wanted to accomplish and life and exactly how to do it? Of course not! We took a job that didn't seem awful, maybe liked it, maybe hated it, maybe liked it then hated it, and then with experience in hand we moved on to something else. Lather, rinse, repeat.

There seems to be this trend among college grads of viewing their first job as some kind of life sentence, which sets them on a narrow path forever and which they wish to delay as long as possible. It's in fact the exact opposite. Endless education is the sentence, assuming it is not in furtherance of a specific goal. It burdens you with debt while simultaneously obstructing you from experiencing true independence. A job is freedom... the freedom to not depend on others for your sustenance, the freedom to make your own career decisions, the freedom to change course and find a better path whenever the opportunity presents itself.

Personally, when I was at the end of college, I couldn't wait to get out on my own, earning a paycheck and enjoying life as a "grown up". I felt certain that life began after school. I was right, and life hasn't disappointed.
post #10 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcbrown View Post


There seems to be this trend among college grads of viewing their first job as some kind of life sentence, which sets them on a narrow path forever and which they wish to delay as long as possible. It's in fact the exact opposite. Endless education is the sentence, assuming it is not in furtherance of a specific goal. It burdens you with debt while simultaneously obstructing you from experiencing true independence. A job is freedom... the freedom to not depend on others for your sustenance, the freedom to make your own career decisions, the freedom to change course and find a better path whenever the opportunity presents itself.

Personally, when I was at the end of college, I couldn't wait to get out on my own, earning a paycheck and enjoying life as a "grown up". I felt certain that life began after school. I was right, and life hasn't disappointed.

 

 

I was enjoying your post a great deal, especially "Endless education is the sentence, assuming it is not in furtherance of a specific goal. It burdens you with debt while simultaneously obstructing you from experiencing true independence." You were making sense... big time. Then you went and defined a job as freedom????

 

------The rest of this post is not directed at anyone imparticular just a JimmyLegacy rant-----

 

A Job is Bondage.... You are controlled by another man, building their dream. Essentially being told when you get out of bed, when to leave your family, when you can eat lunch, when you get to go home. Not to mention, they tell you how many weeks of freedom you get to spend free with your family, the job world calls this "HOLIDAYS" 

 

As an employee you will break your back, bleed and sweat to build another man's dream while he bills you out at 10 times what he pays you. You are a slave! You are told what to think how to think and when to think, there is no liberty. 9.5 times out of 10 as an employee debt will control your brain your whole life.... you will work 40 or 50 hours a week for 40 or 50 years of your life, save up as much as you can (maybe). Pay down a mortgage on your home which is not an asset for you even though you think it is... (it's an asset for the bank) and when that's finally done and lets just hope in your lifetime there isn't an economic downturn (which is extremely unlikely) and WHEN there is that will put you back at least 10 years. After you make it through that and retirement has arrived... you know around 70.... even though you thought it would be 55 (you were young and naive) you sell your house, that thing you paid for for the last 30 or 40 years take your 400 or 500 or 900k of "equity" out move into a smaller place start living like you used to when you were a college kid in a small place and hoping the money you now have tucked away doesn't run out before you die.

 

Now I'm just saying.... that's the majority, but hey roll the dice maybe you'll be the 5% that actually makes it as a "job" person.

 

Let me know!

post #11 of 18
A job is *bondage*? Unless you are an indentured servant, you are doing it voluntarily. No one is forcing you--don't like it? Quit.

What a completely ridiculous assertion. I don't even know what his solution to this "problem" is supposed to be--presumably he wants the government to pay everyone to just sit at home all the time?
post #12 of 18
You made the right decision re: law school. There are people who are struggling to get jobs out of top 14 schools, it gets worse in the top 25 and a tier 3 school is going to be even worse. Unless you truly want to be a lawyer, I would not go anywhere other than a top 14 school or a top 25-30 school if the top 25-30 school provided significant scholarship money. The job prospects just are not there anymore to make law school a good economic decision if you're not sure that's where you want your life to go. A useless masters degree as others have pointed out will not help you or make you more employable. Figure out what you want to do with your life before investing money in graduate school tuition. Your dreams may require or benefit from grad school; if they do, apply and go when you know what you want to do. Until then, find a job. You may not love it, but the odds of finding your dream job right out of undergrad are next to nothing. You're going to have to pay your dues and suck up dealing with things you don't like.
post #13 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by JimmyLegacy View Post

A Job is Bondage.... You are controlled by another man, building their dream. Essentially being told when you get out of bed, when to leave your family, when you can eat lunch, when you get to go home. Not to mention, they tell you how many weeks of freedom you get to spend free with your family, the job world calls this "HOLIDAYS"

If this is your view, I encourage you to read "A Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglas" for some perspective.
post #14 of 18
MBA, with foreign language on the side Spanish, Chinese or Russian.
post #15 of 18
get a job selling something, pretty much anything. learn to sell, if you do well, get a job selling that pays more, do that again. then, see if you want to go back to school.

if you find that you can't sell, see if you can find a skill that you can do, bank clerking or something. try a few things.

good luck
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