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How to get onto a Board - Page 2

post #16 of 136
I have some experience with non-profit boards. Easily 80% of the members--and ALL the chairs and vice chairs and people with power--are the biggest donors. Then you have a scattering of people who are there because of their name, they bring some presitige and/or visilbilty. These people never do any work. Then an even smaller number of people who actually have direct expertise. I gather that you want to be one of those. Well, do an honest assessment and figure out what you can actually contribute and start working with some group. Perhaps after years of unrenumerated toil someone will ask you to be on the board, in which capacity you will have to accept even more unrenumerated toil, and possible liability issues.
post #17 of 136
Thread Starter 
Yeah, I think I need to start seeking out more professional groups and such. I have connections to one overseas board that I think I can wiggle into, but ultimately I think I need to get myself out there more.

To you last three words: D&O Insurance.
post #18 of 136
In nonprofit charity boards you give them money to work for free and hit your friends up for even more money.
post #19 of 136
Manton and Poorsod speak the truth. In my albeit limited experience, there is not only the expectation of a gift of some size but a requirement, if not in writing than by agreement, that members make gifts at a certain threshold. Without that, you ain't getting on.
post #20 of 136
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by poorsod View Post

In nonprofit charity boards you give them money to work for free and hit your friends up for even more money.

I don't see how this just isn't being a "volunteer". Many non-profits have employees, volunteers, and separate boards, which advise strategic decisions. I guess strategic decisions aren't worth anything with some $$$ backing them.
post #21 of 136
I suspect it is because in many nonprofits, a large portion of their operating budget comes from fundraising. That's why fundraising is a big part of the board's function.
post #22 of 136
Thread Starter 
Damn, I don't want to fundraise.
post #23 of 136
Why do you want to be a board member?
post #24 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

I am really smart, have an awesome mind, and sick skills. I want to be on a Board. Unpaid is fine. How do I get on a Board? Do I have to be invited? Can I audit Board meetings of not for profits? How do I do this? I want to get involved in other entities besides my company.

1: Find an organization you want to work with.
2: Go to an event and or contact the org. and volunteer your time.
3: Demonstrate the qualities you profess to have.
4: Make yourself available to serve.
5: Repeat steps 2-4.
6: Discover the true meaning of futility and boredom.
post #25 of 136
pB, have you any experience (mis)managing money?

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/09/25/nyregion/charitys-fired-chief-is-charged-with-stealing-millions.html?src=me&ref=general
post #26 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Damn, I don't want to fundraise.

Some organizations have junior boards for young member outreach and party planning. Each probably has their own requirements for obligations. Eg selling tickets, dues and etc.

Another idea is to get j and Fok to add you to the Styleforum board of directors. This might be the easiest route.
post #27 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Yeah, I think I need to start seeking out more professional groups and such. I have connections to one overseas board that I think I can wiggle into, but ultimately I think I need to get myself out there more.

To you last three words: D&O Insurance.

I currently sit on two boards, and in both circumstances I was recommended as a candidate by someone that leads an industry think-tank type organization. I would recommend thinking about which industries could benefit from your trade-skills and then attend or speak at conferences and trade shows that target that industry. Don't miss the conference cocktail parties. It may take a year or two before the right person recognizes you as a great candidate, but given your described skill set, it will happen sooner or later.

Alternatively you can always write a big check to a non-profit organization.

D&O coverage is definitely "a must."
post #28 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by poorsod View Post
 
Some organizations have junior boards for young member outreach and party planning. Each probably has their own requirements for obligations. Eg selling tickets, dues and etc.

Especially for the fine arts. The New York Met, for example, has a young associates program. Not sure about the Philharmonic (but the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, for example, also has a young professionals program). It's a great way to become a familiar face to the boards of these organizations.

post #29 of 136
Thread Starter 
There are three organizations that I could probably do more with that would lead me to being on their board, however their meetings and events are generally during work hours and I can't just leave work, willy-nilly to go to events. I reckon if I ask myself deep down why I want to be on a board is I like strategic planning, but furthermore I want to beef up my lack-luster resume a bit with experience just besides "I go to work and do a really good job".

Shout out to Fok, and J: Board Memeber for Hire!
post #30 of 136
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

their meetings and events are generally during work hours and I can't just leave work, willy-nilly to go to events.

 

Well, that right there might be a problem. If you're a member of the board, most meetings/official events will be held during work hours. If your current job does not allow you to leave for those, then being a board member (at least an active one) may not be for you.

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