or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › The Watch Appreciation Thread
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

The Watch Appreciation Thread - Page 2202

post #33016 of 35501
Quote:
Originally Posted by academe View Post


As you're probably all aware, I've been bitten by the simple gold dress watch bug, too (though I am in my late 30s). I finally had a chance to visit some boutiques while visiting family in Singapore, and had the opportunity to try on many of the watches discussed here, including the AP Jules Audemars Extra Thin, newer variations of the AP Jules Audemars Self-Winding, AL&S Saxonia Thin, AL&S Saxonia Dual time, AL&S 1815 (40mm, Up/Down, Chronograph), Lange 1, various Breguets, and PP Calatravas. I didn't get a chance to try any Vacherons, but maybe next week.

My favourite of the lot was the AL&S 1815 40mm in rose gold. The blued hands, subtle detailing on the dial (e.g. 3-dot marks at 3, 6, 9 and 12), rail-road track markers, recessed small seconds, three-quarter plate and beautifully finished swan-neck regulator just blew me away. The warmth of the red gold was also very pleasing, really taking a bit of the edge off the famed Glashutte austerity. The 1815 has a lot of heft on the wrist, yet feels incredibly balanced and slips nicely under a shirt cuff. Surprisingly, the 40mm watch sat nicely on my 6.75" wrist (I had gone in with reservations, fearing that the watch might be just a bit too big, with such a narrow bezel); probably something to do with the shape of the lugs. I had expected to be wowed by the AP Jules Audemars Extra Thin (open-worked rotor and movement detailing are simply stunning), Lange 1 or 1815 Chrono (the depth to the chrono movement and fineness of the finishing is simply superlative), but somehow the simple beauty of the 1815 time-only just sung to me. Just enough visual interest to the dial that I could wear the watch on more casual occasions, yet enough German austerity that it easily pairs with a suit and tie. The Saxonia Thin and AP JA Extra Thin felt just that little bit too formal for my needs/life style, with only 2 hands and very plain dials. Now the (long) wait until enough investments have matured that I have a little bit of spare change! confused.gif Here's a photo from watchprosite.com (my own iPhone photos just didn't do the watch justice):

Interesting! I am glad to hear back on your "decision." I think that the AL&S 1815 Small Seconds may very well be the best of the bunch, for similar reasons to yourself. I love the VC Small Seconds, but it certainly lacks that reassuring heft that the Lange has. The Calatrava (5227) has a similar presence, something that I feel other watches in this price range are lacking. However, the 5227 is $10,000 more than the Lange, and $20,000 more than the VC. By the way, did you have a chance to check out the "new" 38.5mm version? That may work even better on your wrist.

It is funny that all this comes up this weekend, as yesterday I went to my semi-local Lange / Patek AD. I tried on the Lange Saxonia Thin, and really, really did not care for it too much. It felt very nice on the wrist, but it looked like a darn dinner plate. And the movement felt a bit small for the case size. I would like to get a chance to see the 38.5 1815 and Saxonia before too long, that might be the direction I end up going. Who knows. I seem to vacillate on a daily basis. Fortunately, I too am in the saving zone. It is not very easy saving up for a purchase this large, especially with NMWA only a click away!

The "time-only gold" watch segment has a ton of really, really great options. Very hard to ween the choices down.

I think one of the greatest things about the AL&S 1815 series is the versatility. I think you are right--in about 75% to 80% of situations, not only would the 1815 be a good choice, but it would be a GREAT choice. I feel it would look at home wearing a suit, or wearing shorts and a polo. That is very important to me.
post #33017 of 35501





post #33018 of 35501
Quote:
Originally Posted by BostonHedonist View Post

For some reason I'm in love with Lume lately. I wonder, does anyone know about Deep Blue's newer Swiss automatic tritium watches?

 

 

I bought one of their divers for $300 when it was on a ShopNBC sale. It was the older model like the one you have pictured, without a lume bezel pip only, not the ones with the flat tubes (which are better, in my eyes) or the ones with the numbers spelled out in lume (HORRIBLY tacky)

 

I ended up flipping it for a healthy profit, which was my original intention anyway, but it was nice to handle them and see the lume in person. Its a neat concept, but the watches themselves are too bulky and aggro-tech styled to be taken seriously. They look like one of Oakley's more mild offerings. They did seem solidly put together, but that entire aesthetic to me screams "trying too hard".

 

In the end, while tritium may have its uses, a properly lumed watch is just as good and way less ridiculous looking. The lume on my Seiko SBDC007 Shogun will easily last through the night if I have been wearing it throughout the day, especially if it has seen a decent amount of sunlight (which is like miracle-gro [glo?] for lume) due to the UV.

 

High quality tritium watches will use "T100" which basically means half the tritium will have decayed within a hundred years, so you can expect far more brightness and longevity than the cheap garbage sporting T25.

 

Keep in mind that those brilliant dark shots you are seeing are long exposures. Dont go into it expecting it to glow like EL wire or something. It is only meant to be clearly visible in pitch blackness. 

post #33019 of 35501
Lumibrite/Luminova is more than good enough for everyday wear. The tritium gas tubes present a problem in that they're a gimmick that becomes a selling point for the watch, but basically start to dim out after ten or so years. As noted they can also break. And since they're restricted to certain shapes they limit dial design.

Meanwhile I have a CWC SBS with Tritium paste markers that still glows pretty well after a decade. AND a Seiko 7C43 with Promethium markers from 1991 that still glow, albeit dimly.

The gas tubes were an attempt to simplify the rad waste disposal issues with military issue timepieces. There was also the (non-)ssue of confusing dosimeters in nuke spaces, which ended up being met by issue watches with Luminova (US) or no lume at all (UK).
post #33020 of 35501
Quote:
Originally Posted by Newcomer View Post

Interesting! I am glad to hear back on your "decision." I think that the AL&S 1815 Small Seconds may very well be the best of the bunch, for similar reasons to yourself. I love the VC Small Seconds, but it certainly lacks that reassuring heft that the Lange has. The Calatrava (5227) has a similar presence, something that I feel other watches in this price range are lacking. However, the 5227 is $10,000 more than the Lange, and $20,000 more than the VC. By the way, did you have a chance to check out the "new" 38.5mm version? That may work even better on your wrist.

It is funny that all this comes up this weekend, as yesterday I went to my semi-local Lange / Patek AD. I tried on the Lange Saxonia Thin, and really, really did not care for it too much. It felt very nice on the wrist, but it looked like a darn dinner plate. And the movement felt a bit small for the case size. I would like to get a chance to see the 38.5 1815 and Saxonia before too long, that might be the direction I end up going. Who knows. I seem to vacillate on a daily basis. Fortunately, I too am in the saving zone. It is not very easy saving up for a purchase this large, especially with NMWA only a click away!

The "time-only gold" watch segment has a ton of really, really great options. Very hard to ween the choices down.

I think one of the greatest things about the AL&S 1815 series is the versatility. I think you are right--in about 75% to 80% of situations, not only would the 1815 be a good choice, but it would be a GREAT choice. I feel it would look at home wearing a suit, or wearing shorts and a polo. That is very important to me.

To me, the Saxonia Thin felt in some respects almost like the Platonic ideal of a watch, but didn't have the same degree of warmth as the 1815. I was less concerned about things like the movement size relative to the size of the case (as the discrepancy is not as large as for the time only Saxonia, some of the PP Caletravas, or VC Patrimonys). Also, at least in my own subjective view and worn on my own wrist, the watch didn't look or feel dinner-plate like (nor did the 40mm AP JA Extra Thin or the 41mm VC Patrimony Traditionelle Self-Winding); I think the dinner-plate like appearance is contingent upon your wrist shape and geometry. The biggest thing for me was the feeling of warmth and rightness I felt when strapping the 1815 on. That moment when you know that is the watch for you...

I had hoped to try on the 38.5mm version of the 1815, but alas very few units had shipped to Singapore (at least our friend who's dealership I visited had not received any since the launch of the new models earlier this year). I suspect I would like the 38.5mm as much as the 40mm; perhaps incrementally more, as the more conservative dimensions appeal to my classical impulses. When the time comes, I may in fact order the 38.5mm. Based on the wrist presence of the Up/Down which I tried (39mm case), I suspect the smaller case size of the new 1815 will have just as much wrist presence as the 40mm version.

Stay strong and keep saving - you'll ultimately regret splurging on another watch and not holding out for the one you really want. Less is more! biggrin.gif
post #33021 of 35501
For me, lume is a non-issue when considering a watch. dontknow.gif

I honestly can't think of a situation where I've thought: "Damn, I wish this glowed in the dark..."

IMG_0479.jpg

IMG_0477.jpg

IMG_0563.jpg
post #33022 of 35501

What a beautiful trio.  After looking recently at all those Tudor and Rolex sports watches side by side, the proportions of your "Coke" really stand out as immaculate.  And the case shape of that GP chrono is mouth-watering.  Reverso GMt 8 Days is pretty sexy too, and unusual - what size is that?

post #33023 of 35501
Mimo, I think that's a

pepsisign_5276.jpg

- but I very much agree on the proportion comment :-)
post #33024 of 35501

Ah, my tired old eyes...or just the light in the pic vs my dimmed monitor - that's my excuse! But in mitigation, I think he has both...:revolve: 

post #33025 of 35501
I can't really see the blue on my screen either, but I don't think they made a Coke while they still had dials without the WG surrounds. But I may be wrong about that.
post #33026 of 35501

I consider myself firmly out-nerded; about that I have no idea.  This thread just keeps on giving. :)

post #33027 of 35501
I'm definitely not an expert on GMT history, but from what I can gather from a quick googling, it looks like the first Coke introduced in '83 also was the first GMT with WG surrounds.

http://www.gmtmasterhistory.com/gmt-master_ref_16760.html

Now we know - until someone tells us different, anyway ;-)
post #33028 of 35501
Thanks guys!

Yes, that photo showed an old blue/red insert that's faded somewhat; it's my favourite one. The GMT II mentioned originally came with the black/burgundy insert, but that lasted about a day before I picked up a blue/red one from the local dealer (they're a easier about parts here than certain areas of the world).

The ability to completely change the look of the watch with inserts and strap options is one of the reasons I love the older GMTs, plus they're nice and slim so they're great to wear, and they have enough reliable pressure resistance for anyone except a saturation diver. I've said it before and I'll likely say it again: I think the 16710 is impossible to beat as a single do-anything watch for a normal person.

You can get a bit carried away with GMT / GMT II inserts, though. I have almost a dozen between my three GMTs so I reckon I'm more or less set for life. shog[1].gif

These are the only photos of mine I could dig up after imageshack vaporized my main stash; I have better ones somewhere...


Original to watch

74c84df6_dsc8053a.jpeg
Fresh vs. super-faded

9b11c0b5_dsc0442ko.jpeg
Black fat font insert faded to slatey dark-grey/blue

The first GMTs had Bakelite inserts with radium lume. They're worth a fortune these days ($20K+ just for the insert), since they were recalled and replaced with the more-familiar aluminum ones due to radiation levels. The black option started becoming available with the 1675, and the black/burgundy started with the first GMT II (16760) in '83. There were some uncommon versions as well, such as all-blue and all-brown plus the options for two-tone and 18K watches.


Recall notice for radium-bezel GMTs


hodinkee.com


hodinkee.com
post #33029 of 35501
^ Thanks, good info and great photos.

Me, I'll take a 1675 (or a 16750 with matte dial and without white gold indexes), preferably without any significant fading or tritium patina. Something like this one:

16750-1.jpg
From gmtmasterhistory

satisfied.gif
post #33030 of 35501
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kaplan View Post

^ Thanks, good info and great photos.

Me, I'll take a 1675 (or a 16750 with matte dial and without white gold indexes), preferably without any significant fading or tritium patina.

satisfied.gif
Agreed. Matte GMT is the watch I'm grabbing if my house burns down (and I'm tight on time, obviously.)
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › The Watch Appreciation Thread