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The Watch Appreciation Thread - Page 2113

post #31681 of 33880
Quote:
Originally Posted by Winot View Post


Tried on the Grande Taille and the Ultra Thin at Mappin & Webb Regent St yesterday. Going to put the Lange Dualtime on hold and get the UT in steel VAT free at the M&W store at LHR T5 tomorrow.

Great choice.  I look forward to seeing some wrist shots of your new JLC soon!

post #31682 of 33880
Winot, those are some nice Reverso wrist shots. Can't go wrong with either choice....thanks for posting.


NS, I knew you had some other Heuers, but didn't realize you had those two Autavia panda dial versions that seem like siblings.
post #31683 of 33880
Quote:
Originally Posted by culverwood View Post


Let me take you back to the 23rd March 2013 on TWAT.

 

I figured...what's scary is that anyone recalls these things so vividly: beware of the internet, as every word is FOREVER!

 

For what it's worth, I find a lot of IWCs really beautiful.  But I do think that both the Portuguese and the Portofino have a certain awkwardness about the cases.  The former especially, with that lip around the outside, sits up and catches on your shirt sleeve.  Still, each to his own, and I'd be proud to own one nevertheless.

post #31684 of 33880
Quote:
8evatada.jpg



^^^^ Upon further review, this one (the Grand Taille) looks sooooo dreamy to me. ^^^

Love the textured dial, love the rectangular sub-seconds echoing the case shape.

"That's hot."

Of course you can't go wrong with either watch.

Does this model really feel that much thicker vs. the Ultra Thin? Are the other case dimensions the same?
post #31685 of 33880
Quote:
Originally Posted by mimo View Post

I figured...what's scary is that anyone recalls these things so vividly: beware of the internet, as every word is FOREVER!

For what it's worth, I find a lot of IWCs really beautiful.  But I do think that both the Portuguese and the Portofino have a certain awkwardness about the cases.  The former especially, with that lip around the outside, sits up and catches on your shirt sleeve.  Still, each to his own, and I'd be proud to own one nevertheless.
I liked IWC's pre-Richemont designs, but they've been getting worse with each redesign to the point where some look as gaudy as Zenith's old Defy line.

This convention speech by CEO Georges Kern explains a lot about what's behind their current direction. I respect his forthrightness about "storytelling" and how they invent stuff as they go along, but I don't think faux history and such a relentless focus on marketing, "playing the game", image and celebrity is a good strategy in the long run (though I'm probably being rather naïve).

It's surprising how straight-up he is about the product's inherent uselessness and ridiculous pricing, "selling a dream", and how they're all about making profits for shareholders. Though I personally wouldn't buy a modern IWC, I bet he'd be cool to sit down and have a bottle of wine with; the guy's no dummy.



It's a bit long at nearly nineteen minutes, but a lot of the good stuff is in the first two or three of 'em. Would love to hear other's thoughts on this.
post #31686 of 33880

I personally dislike that amount of connection with celebrities.

Then again, I do realize that most of the people who got rich quickly and can afford these watches, probably never heard about the IWC.

All they know is Rolex/ Patek, so this kind of aggressive marketing is probably best they are doing for their profit..

When I was in a Milan last year, I noticed one interesting thing in Piazza del Duomo .. I was watching some IWC and Breguet through a window shop, when all of a sudden a group of Asian tourists appeared next to me.

5 of them put their heads so close to the window that I could see their breath fog on a glass, and guess what, they were all watching and commenting on the Rolex pieces costing like 30% off a price of a Breguet or IWC.

In their heads Rolex has that aura of luxury, and they are clueless what complication really are.

And like the Kern said, and I believe it - half of the Porsche 911 owners don't know if the engine is in front or back of their cars..
 

post #31687 of 33880
Hey Belli, I will check that out tonight when I get the chance, looks fascinating.
post #31688 of 33880

Belli, I enjoyed that very much.  I don't think it's brave for him to say, really, as one way or another that's how the whole industry works: I'm sure most of the punters in this thread think of themselves as discerning connoisseurs of art, and I'm equally sure that that is often true.  But we also know that what Kern said about emotion is just hard fact: there is no logical reason to own a mechanical wristwatch at all other than emotion. Just like the Porsches, there is an elegant mix of aesthetic appearance, purposeful design - perhaps with a proud history, and a perception of successful lifestyle.  A quartz 
Sekonda is, empirically, a better time-keeping device than a Patek 5140P.  Depending on your point of view, it could even be as pretty.  So what's for sale if not engineering for its own sake, combined with a feeling of having something exclusive and privileged?

 

Kern majors very much on the latter, as perhaps as per the Porsche analogy, only a few aficionados understand the engineering aspect, and their set does not necessarily overlap much with that "top half million" high earners who will buy the latest IWC.  It's an interesting insight into the particular thought process behind a promotional campaign, and to me really quite pleasing for its directness.  As Kern said, at some points "bordering on kitsch".  Take a very specific and romanticised lifestyle image from the annals, populate it with the beautiful and famous of the present day, and slather your product all over it before serving.  They did it very well.  The waiter with the Rolex was definitely amusing, but more so was the comment in the first minute along the lines of "Patek and IWC" being the top of the market: it's one thing to throw an obvious shot at the market leader in your price range.  It's another, and either very transparent or deliciously ironic, to begin a talk about brand building by tying yours to the very top of the market in an apparently thoughtless aside!

 

There's an interesting paradox about this business of selling a premium luxury item, though: of all the market sectors in consumer goods, this is perhaps the one where the least wit and guile is required.  You need to be clever to sell washing powder X over washing powder Y, building technical, brand, social and price elements in with your emotional message.  But with this part of the market, there is no contrived effort to persuade the customer of better value: on the contrary, the successful brands in the luxury watch market seem only to suggest that they are sufficiently expensive.  

post #31689 of 33880
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nikola View Post

I[...]Then again, I do realize that most of the people who got rich quickly and can afford these watches, probably never heard about the IWC.
To fix that, I kinda figure that increase-people-who-got-rich-quickly-awareness must be the goal with the new designs and fabulous-sexy-costume-parties-with-celebrities thing. The less-nakedly-aspirational "Here is a well-made, badass watch. The following qualities are what make it well-made and badass: ____. It's also classically good-looking and doesn't call so much bloody attention to itself." days are apparently over.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Newcomer View Post

Hey Belli, I will check that out tonight when I get the chance, looks fascinating.
Aw, dude! I reckon a few parts of it are as close as I've ever heard to being a fly on the wall at Luxury Conglomerate Fight Club.
Quote:
Originally Posted by mimo View Post

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Belli, I enjoyed that very much. I don't think it's brave for him to say, really, as one way or another that's how the whole industry works: I'm sure most of the punters in this thread think of themselves as discerning connoisseurs of art, and I'm equally sure that that is often true.  But we also know that what Kern said about emotion is just hard fact: there is no logical reason to own a mechanical wristwatch at all other than emotion. Just like the Porsches, there is an elegant mix of aesthetic appearance, purposeful design - perhaps with a proud history, and a perception of successful lifestyle.  A quartz 

Sekonda is, empirically, a better time-keeping device than a Patek 5140P.  Depending on your point of view, it could even be as pretty.  So what's for sale if not engineering for its own sake, combined with a feeling of having something exclusive and privileged?

Kern majors very much on the latter, as perhaps as per the Porsche analogy, only a few aficionados understand the engineering aspect, and their set does not necessarily overlap much with that "top half million" high earners who will buy the latest IWC.  It's an interesting insight into the particular thought process behind a promotional campaign, and to me really quite pleasing for its directness.  As Kern said, at some points "bordering on kitsch".  Take a very specific and romanticised lifestyle image from the annals, populate it with the beautiful and famous of the present day, and slather your product all over it before serving.  They did it very well.  The waiter with the Rolex was definitely amusing, but more so was the comment in the first minute along the lines of "Patek and IWC" being the top of the market: it's one thing to throw an obvious shot at the market leader in your price range.  It's another, and either very transparent or deliciously ironic, to begin a talk about brand building by tying yours to the very top of the market in an apparently thoughtless aside!

There's an interesting paradox about this business of selling a premium luxury item, though: of all the market sectors in consumer goods, this is perhaps the one where the least wit and guile is required.  You need to be clever to sell washing powder X over washing powder Y, building technical, brand, social and price elements in with your emotional message.  
But with this part of the market, there is no contrived effort to persuade the customer of better value: on the contrary, the successful brands in the luxury watch market seem only to suggest that they are sufficiently expensive.  
Thanks, I'm glad you thought it was worth watching!

Hmm, good point about the embracing-Veblen thing. Maybe they're on to something.

One thing is for certain: there is no stopping them; the ants will soon be here. And I for one welcome our new insect overlords. I’d like to remind them that as a trusted TV personality, I can be helpful in rounding up others to toil in their underground factories.



In all seriousness, I think the old-school approach of establishing a reputation by making a distinctive, special, and semi-useful item to a high standard and letting the rich and famous come to you was a sound one. Ah, the good ol' days before the peasants got literate...
Edited by Belligero - 5/8/14 at 3:19pm
post #31690 of 33880
Quote:
Originally Posted by Keith T View Post

^^^^ Upon further review, this one (the Grand Taille) looks sooooo dreamy to me. ^^^

Love the textured dial, love the rectangular sub-seconds echoing the case shape.

"That's hot."

Of course you can't go wrong with either watch.

Does this model really feel that much thicker vs. the Ultra Thin? Are the other case dimensions the same?

Yes, it feels a lot thicker to me, but I think I am unusually sensitive to thick watches (normally wear a Nomos Tetra or Eternamatic dress watch which are even thinner). Other dimensions are the same I think.

I thought I would like the Grande Taille more. Just goes to show you need to see the damn things irl.
post #31691 of 33880
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dino944 View Post

I'm not usually one for gold/tan watch straps... but that looks fantastic!  Great choice...enjoy it!

You will have to post some pix when your new strap arrives.  As for it lasting a long time...depends a bit on how much you wear it and your environment...really hot humid weather where you will perspire a lot generally expedites the death of nice straps.  But hopefully you will get a few years out of it.


 inlove.gif Congrats that's a beauty!

Yes, I can't wait for my new strap to arrive - my straps used to only last a year on my previous Blancpain, but this one is much better quality and it doesn't really get hot in England much - if it does I'll wear my Technomarine steel or Citizen steel and gold watches instead to make the strap last longer!smile.gif
post #31692 of 33880
Quote:
Originally Posted by chobochobo View Post

20140507_175507_zpsvf9tohbj.jpg


Beautiful...In that watch is contained the true essence of elegance and quality.

post #31693 of 33880
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gianni Cerutti View Post
 


Beautiful...In that watch is contained the true essence of elegance and quality.

 

In that case, I'd be slightly concerned about the possibility of condensation on the inside of the crystal!

post #31694 of 33880
Lunch with friends:

qarybeba.jpg
post #31695 of 33880

Very cool. The only one that is not of my taste is that big juicy B&R, but they seem to have a large following.

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