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The Watch Appreciation Thread - Page 1596

post #23926 of 39105
I have found myself in the position of having wanted to time a trip and then forget to stop and record the time, letting the chrono run for several hours in the process.
post #23927 of 39105
Sea Dweller today.
post #23928 of 39105
That's exactly what I think about the GF World Time....

Which is why the Glashutte limited edition Cosmopolite is my new grail watch....

post #23929 of 39105
Quote:
Originally Posted by Superfluous View Post

People with chronos, such as Daytonas, do you leave the chrono running at all times? I leave mine right now inactive and sometimes people ask why my watch isn't running. Other than draining the power reserve faster, is it bad to leave it running?

No I don't leave it running all the time.  Draining the power reserve doesn't bother me, but it puts needless wear and tear on the chronograph.  I had seen this same question asked a few times so I once asked a watch maker about leaving a chrono function running, and he replied, "Why would you do that?  After you drive home, do you go in the house and leave your car running until the next morning when you leave again for work?"  He said, you can do that, the watch isn't going to explode, but it puts needless wear and tear on the gears, etc.  He said its good to run it sometimes just to keep everything in good working order and lubricated, but he wouldn't leave his chronograph running all the time.   

post #23930 of 39105
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hayward View Post

I have found myself in the position of having wanted to time a trip and then forget to stop and record the time, letting the chrono run for several hours in the process.

Been there, done that. 

post #23931 of 39105
Of course I have taken a small interest in Omega and Ive seen a few Omega commercials. Awesome.
post #23932 of 39105

Your average thee-register chronograph is designed to time events up to 12 hours in length - you're not going to harm it by letting it run for extended periods of time.  I've certainly never had a chronograph suffer any damage whatsoever from being left running during the course of he day - and I like to see the sweep hand sweep, and the totalizers do their thing. 

 

And if it is an automatic chronograph, you won't appreciably reduce the power reserve.  I think the analogy of leaving your car engine running is more apt in the context of those who use watch winders - keeping their watches running constantly even when not in use.

post #23933 of 39105
I am not the most knowledgeable about this... but I thought it was largely dependent on whether it was a column wheel chronograph with a vertical clutch? I thought that having a vertical clutch substantially mitigated the wear-and-tear from running it? At the end of the day, I guess running it will always cause more wear and tear than not running it.
post #23934 of 39105
Quote:
Originally Posted by rpearlberg View Post

my daily watch of choice...

Stunning watch... Very stylish - the green works well against the black dial... Thanks for sharing smile.gif
post #23935 of 39105
Quote:
Originally Posted by Superfluous View Post

People with chronos, such as Daytonas, do you leave the chrono running at all times? I leave mine right now inactive and sometimes people ask why my watch isn't running. Other than draining the power reserve faster, is it bad to leave it running?

A friend of mine was given quite a nice Tag Heuer chronograph as a graduation present some years back and he left the chrono function running all the time because, I later discovered, he'd never bothered to find out how to actually operate the watch!

We were having lunch after he'd been wearing the watch for eight months or so and I noticed that the sweep seconds hand was going around the dial, so I asked him if he was timing something. He looked blank and I explained that it was part of the stopwatch function and that he could stop it by pressing the upper button and then reset the position by pressing the lower button. He said that he'd never realised and that he must have pressed the "start" button when he was looking at the watch after it had been given to him and that he'd never stopped it!

So, I suppose that it could cause greater wear-and-tear on the watch, but it didn't seem to hurt my friend's watch to have his chrono function running continuously for about eight months. That was about fifteen years ago and his watch is still running without any problems.
post #23936 of 39105
Quote:
Originally Posted by Newcomer View Post

I am not the most knowledgeable about this... but I thought it was largely dependent on whether it was a column wheel chronograph with a vertical clutch? I thought that having a vertical clutch substantially mitigated the wear-and-tear from running it? At the end of the day, I guess running it will always cause more wear and tear than not running it.

 

You may be right - though I would have thought that both the column wheel and the vertical clutch come into play during the start / stop / reset cycle - not when the chrono is simply running.

 

Clearly running the chrono always will cause more wear than not running it at all - just as running the watch itself will cause more wear than not running it at all.  But both the watch and the chrono are designed to run - they are not grinding themselves away prematurely by being used in the very way they were designed to be used.  Just like any mechanical piece, they will require periodic service to ensure proper function and long life.  Refraining from using the chrono - or deciding to use it sparingly - won't change that reality.

post #23937 of 39105
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chuckie Egg View Post

Stunning watch... Very stylish - the green works well against the black dial... Thanks for sharing smile.gif
Thanks. I'd like to eventually move up to an Omega or Rolex, but this will do for now...
post #23938 of 39105
Quote:
Originally Posted by RogerP View Post

Your average thee-register chronograph is designed to time events up to 12 hours in length - you're not going to harm it by letting it run for extended periods of time.  I've certainly never had a chronograph suffer any damage whatsoever from being left running during the course of he day - and I like to see the sweep hand sweep, and the totalizers do their thing. 

And if it is an automatic chronograph, you won't appreciably reduce the power reserve.  I think the analogy of leaving your car engine running is more apt in the context of those who use watch winders - keeping their watches running constantly even when not in use.

Yes, a three register chronograph is desinged to time event that are up to 12 hours in duration. However in reality, that does not necessarily mean its was intended to run 24/7 365 days per year.

Of course its not going to blow up or wear the gears down to nothing. However, it will over time experience more wear & tear than one that has used the chrono function as needed, or as wanted rather than 24/7. A watch with average use probably will simply get cleaned and lubricated. A watch with the chrono running 24/7 may need some parts replaced. Not the biggest deal in the world, but its more than cleaning & lubrication and adds to the bill. Remember that although the gears are not gnashing, no matter how well engineered and lubricated there is some small amount of friction. It just can't be helped.

I think you may be taking the car analogy a bit literally. His point was unnecessary wear & tear. However, since you brought it up, your explanation of car analogy being like a watch on a winder isn't really acurate or the same. Cars are not intended to idle for 12 hours (its actually bad for cars. You'd see low mileage cars sustaining more significant wear on pistons, rings and valves, carbon deposits gumming up valves, premature replacing of catalytic converters and exhaust systems). While a watch is intended to tell time all day, everyday for several years.

It's one thing to replace rings, valves, exhaust if you've actually driven 250,000 miles... But it would seem like a waste of money & effort to do that at 20,000 miles from letting a car idle over night, every night for 5 years.

I've followed the watchmaker's advice and my chronographs have never had any problems or required any parts be replaced (just cleaned and lubricated). However, the OP can certainly do whatever he likes its his watch.
post #23939 of 39105
Panerai looks fantastic. Here's my modest contribution.16.gif
post #23940 of 39105
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dino944 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Superfluous View Post

People with chronos, such as Daytonas, do you leave the chrono running at all times? I leave mine right now inactive and sometimes people ask why my watch isn't running. Other than draining the power reserve faster, is it bad to leave it running?
No I don't leave it running all the time.  Draining the power reserve doesn't bother me, but it puts needless wear and tear on the chronograph.  I had seen this same question asked a few times so I once asked a watch maker about leaving a chrono function running, and he replied, "Why would you do that?  After you drive home, do you go in the house and leave your car running until the next morning when you leave again for work?"  He said, you can do that, the watch isn't going to explode, but it puts needless wear and tear on the gears, etc.  He said its good to run it sometimes just to keep everything in good working order and lubricated, but he wouldn't leave his chronograph running all the time.   

Love the analogy! biggrin.gif
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