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The Watch Appreciation Thread - Page 1281

post #19201 of 34712
Quote:
Originally Posted by RogerP View Post

Thank you my man.  When I get around to having a black strap made up I'll post up that combo as well.  So far I find I'm liking the watch better on a strap than on the bracelet - can't believe it took me a year to give it a try.  The case shape seems to stand out more without the end links from the bracelet wedged between the lugs.

Coldcava - was there a particular Reverso you were considering, and did you want it to fill a dress watch role?

Yes to both... Needed something to fill the dress watch role, and was looking at either the Grand Taille or the Calendar.
post #19202 of 34712
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

...

IWC is Swiss, not German.

And to be perfectly honest, I think that IWC in a way is often more offensive than Omega. The new Ingenieur's retail for $6,500, and have piss poor AM ability and are modified ETAs. The new 8500 Omegas, in my most humble of opinions, are some of the best watches out there for the money. The 8500 movement is beautifully finished, is supposedly very reliable, and has some very interesting additions. Yes, the IWC Port 5001 is superior to the AT 8500, but we are also talking about double the price range. To be honest, I think that IWC is "Paneraizing" themselves rather than "Omegaizing" (disclaimer: I am OK with Panerai doing this, as I think that their designs speak for themselves). Personally, design choices aside, I like where Omega is going. I think the previous gen PO is beautiful, and I think they generally have some lovely designs out there (Speedy, AT).

And IWC being better finished than JLC? I guess I just disagree with that. You say that it is supposed to appear engineered, and thus there is no bevelled edges or anglage. However, anglage and beveling is incredibly purposive--it reduces friction in the parts.

I guess I am a bit of an IWC hater. I wish that IWC would take back their designs even further, before the 2004-2005 days.

I yearn after the IWC Minute Repeater... so hawt.

Just having some fun here, it is nice to have a little foo.gif in the thread.
post #19203 of 34712
Loving the winder... Wolf Roadster Triple
post #19204 of 34712
Quote:
Originally Posted by Newcomer View Post

IWC is Swiss, not German.

And to be perfectly honest, I think that IWC in a way is often more offensive than Omega. The new Ingenieur's retail for $6,500, and have piss poor AM ability and are modified ETAs. The new 8500 Omegas, in my most humble of opinions, are some of the best watches out there for the money. The 8500 movement is beautifully finished, is supposedly very reliable, and has some very interesting additions. Yes, the IWC Port 5001 is superior to the AT 8500, but we are also talking about double the price range. To be honest, I think that IWC is "Paneraizing" themselves rather than "Omegaizing" (disclaimer: I am OK with Panerai doing this, as I think that their designs speak for themselves). Personally, design choices aside, I like where Omega is going. I think the previous gen PO is beautiful, and I think they generally have some lovely designs out there (Speedy, AT).

And IWC being better finished than JLC? I guess I just disagree with that. You say that it is supposed to appear engineered, and thus there is no bevelled edges or anglage. However, anglage and beveling is incredibly purposive--it reduces friction in the parts.

I guess I am a bit of an IWC hater. I wish that IWC would take back their designs even further, before the 2004-2005 days.

I yearn after the IWC Minute Repeater... so hawt.

Just having some fun here, it is nice to have a little foo.gif in the thread.

Similar thoughts from me here, but I'm a big fan of the Ingenieur refresh.
post #19205 of 34712
Quote:
Originally Posted by Newcomer View Post

IWC is Swiss, not German.

And to be perfectly honest, I think that IWC in a way is often more offensive than Omega. The new Ingenieur's retail for $6,500, and have piss poor AM ability and are modified ETAs. The new 8500 Omegas, in my most humble of opinions, are some of the best watches out there for the money. The 8500 movement is beautifully finished, is supposedly very reliable, and has some very interesting additions. Yes, the IWC Port 5001 is superior to the AT 8500, but we are also talking about double the price range. To be honest, I think that IWC is "Paneraizing" themselves rather than "Omegaizing" (disclaimer: I am OK with Panerai doing this, as I think that their designs speak for themselves). Personally, design choices aside, I like where Omega is going. I think the previous gen PO is beautiful, and I think they generally have some lovely designs out there (Speedy, AT).

And IWC being better finished than JLC? I guess I just disagree with that. You say that it is supposed to appear engineered, and thus there is no bevelled edges or anglage. However, anglage and beveling is incredibly purposive--it reduces friction in the parts.

I guess I am a bit of an IWC hater. I wish that IWC would take back their designs even further, before the 2004-2005 days.

I yearn after the IWC Minute Repeater... so hawt.

Just having some fun here, it is nice to have a little foo.gif in the thread.

IWC is Swiss, but in the German part of Switzerland, whereas most watchmakers are in the French portion. That has always significantly impacted their watchmaking ethos, and also made them the natural choice when Lange needed expertise to re-launch itself. So, yes, I think it is fair to say that IWC is more Germanic in design than its other Swiss competitors.

How does anglage on non-moving plates decrease friction? All the movement of other parts will be lateral to the plates' surface. Perlage and Geneva stripes, on the other hand, are very functional for that reason.
post #19206 of 34712
Quote:
Originally Posted by Newcomer View Post


IWC is Swiss, not German.

And to be perfectly honest, I think that IWC in a way is often more offensive than Omega. The new Ingenieur's retail for $6,500, and have piss poor AM ability and are modified ETAs. The new 8500 Omegas, in my most humble of opinions, are some of the best watches out there for the money. The 8500 movement is beautifully finished, is supposedly very reliable, and has some very interesting additions. Yes, the IWC Port 5001 is superior to the AT 8500, but we are also talking about double the price range. To be honest, I think that IWC is "Paneraizing" themselves rather than "Omegaizing" (disclaimer: I am OK with Panerai doing this, as I think that their designs speak for themselves). Personally, design choices aside, I like where Omega is going. I think the previous gen PO is beautiful, and I think they generally have some lovely designs out there (Speedy, AT).

And IWC being better finished than JLC? I guess I just disagree with that. You say that it is supposed to appear engineered, and thus there is no bevelled edges or anglage. However, anglage and beveling is incredibly purposive--it reduces friction in the parts.

I guess I am a bit of an IWC hater. I wish that IWC would take back their designs even further, before the 2004-2005 days.

I yearn after the IWC Minute Repeater... so hawt.

Just having some fun here, it is nice to have a little foo.gif in the thread.

 

That all goes for me, too.  Well said and spot on.

post #19207 of 34712
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coldcava View Post


Yes to both... Needed something to fill the dress watch role, and was looking at either the Grand Taille or the Calendar.

 

The Grand Taille would be my choice here.  I'd rock that with a suit 5 days a week.

post #19208 of 34712
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

IWC is Swiss, but in the German part of Switzerland, whereas most watchmakers are in the French portion. That has always significantly impacted their watchmaking ethos, and also made them the natural choice when Lange needed expertise to re-launch itself. So, yes, I think it is fair to say that IWC is more Germanic in design than its other Swiss competitors.

How does anglage on non-moving plates decrease friction? All the movement of other parts will be lateral to the plates' surface. Perlage and Geneva stripes, on the other hand, are very functional for that reason.

On non-moving plates, yes, anglage does not decrease friction. However, on moving parts, it is very functional:



Furthermore, it also assists with assembly and with repair, as the sharp edges do not "catch."

And your perspective is interest with respect to IWC's watchmaking "ethos." Although I agree that it may be their "cited" reason, do you really think that they do not want to engage in greater hand-finishing because it would otherwise clash with their "ethos?"

And interesting points with respect to their heritage being more German than Switzerland. Admittedly, I am not very familiar with much of Switzerland's cultural background!
post #19209 of 34712
Anglage on gear teeth like you show is not common, even amongst the high-end makers mentioned. Since gears only rotate laterally, I cannot see how that kind of finishing would be helpful. The profile and regularity of the teeth are infinitely more important, and what we look to when judging movement design and finish. You generally want very sharp, defined edges on teeth, not anything rounded off. After all, precision is key. As for other moving parts that go unseen, IWC does chamfer where it is functional.

What do you mean by "greater hand-finishing?" Again, there is a difference between the degree of embellishment, and the quality of finish. In terms of embellishment, IWC movements don't really register. They have always verged on a more serious, engineered approach. So, superficial anglage is not to be seen (such as on plates). I see great merit in this more honest approach. A lot of more eye-catching movements distract you with flourish, but lack in true quality of finish. In contrast, IWC finishing has been known to be painfully immaculate, though more spartan. Does that make IWC finishing less "great?" I don't think so at all. I'm much more interested in how well the finishing applied has been executed. How fine and regular are the cotes de Geneve? Are edges razor sharp or are they burred and pitted under magnification? Is perlage applied with care, such that the "pearls" are equal in size and placed in a regular, consistent pattern, or is it haphazard (such as in the case of Rolex)? Are you more interested in dazzle or quality?

Switzerland is a cross-section of Italian, German, and French culture. Different parts of the country are more given to one than the other. IWC has always been the only major manufacture in the German-speaking region. Hence, the watches have always been more austere and less given to whimsy.

As for whether IWC could embellish their movements more than they do: as I pointed out above, all the finishing you see on Lange watches was taught to Lange by IWC. However, Lange finishing is far from "honest." The most obvious example of what I mean is the screwed chatons securing the jewels. The screws and chatons are completely without added function. They just look pretty. Nobody else uses them and Lange thought it would be one way to distinguish themselves.
post #19210 of 34712

A gift from my uncle after undergrad. Have had this bad boy for over 10 years..My first real watch..

 

Does not get a lot of play because I'm not a fan of gold tone watches or metal straps.. but I break it out here and there..

post #19211 of 34712
technically, IWC is kind of american. USA USA USA USA!!! stirpot.gif

apropos - great info on JLC engraving and enameling. much appreciated.
post #19212 of 34712
Quote:
Originally Posted by RogerP View Post

New shoes for the Speedy 9300. Worn on the bracelet since day one, I decided to try it out on a strap. I dug through the strap drawer and found a nice Camille Fournet in semi-glosse black gator, but thought it looked a touch too formal on this sporty watch. So I tried this matte medium brown TWB croc  instead: Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)


i think that looks quite nice on the brown.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dino944 View Post

Quote:
If you can find someone that is willing to part with there Collection Privee Cartier Tank XL (although I am biased) thats a watch I would try to track down.  Its an icon.  Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
There maybe be several Tank style watches, but its a signature piece from Cartier which they first introduced around 1917.  They made 200 in rose and 50 in platinum.  The base movement is a Piaget, finished to Cartier's own standards, and its rectangular (most companies stuff a smaller round movement in a rectangular case because its less expensive to use in the long run as it can be used in round pieces also).  Whether someone would be willing to sell theirs to you for $10K...I don't know.  The few others I know that own them, love them and aren't parting with them.  Still no harm in looking/asking.  There are some other variations on Tanks from Cartier that are also quite nice...and you may be able to get for less as there are many more of them out there like the Tank Americaine.   The Tank Chinoise from Cartier is also a cool design, a tad smaller but very handsome...its a bit more square than rectangular.

Here are a few photos of mine.
Best regards,
Dino

P. S. Also if you're just looking for rectangular watch and not necessarily a Tank the JLC Reverso offers many great options.



1000




looks positively lovely. especially the back.
post #19213 of 34712
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

The "watches for men" tagline has been around since at least 2004. It was actually quite controversial at the time. I happen to like it, as it captures the right spirit of a serious tool watch by being direct and to the point.
Ads playing on IWC being watches for men goes a good deal further back than that. When the Swiss ad agency GGK was in charge (1978-1995), they had lines like 'IWC. Since 1868 and for as long as men still exist'. Wirz Werbung then took over (1996-2004) with lines like 'Men earn more than women. For example an IWC.'


Quote:
Originally Posted by in stitches View Post

technically, IWC is kind of american.
IWC was obviously started by an American, Florentine Ariosto Jones (who went to Switzerland in 1868 to make watches for the US market, as trained watchmakers were cheaper there than back in the US). He went bankrupt in about '76 and from 1879 IWC became a Swiss family business (Jung became part of this family).

I agree that aesthetically there's nothing IWC does now, that they haven't done better in the past.
post #19214 of 34712

Thanks for the advice, all.

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by apropos View Post

Yep, there are special leather straps which are sweat resistant but none of them have performed well for me. I usually use a Perlon (woven nylon) strap, and IMO that would suit the Speedmaster.

This is a Perlon strap:



Rubber straps just feel sticky to me, but YMMV.

BTW temperatures in most of SE Asia rarely reach 40C, but it often feels much much much worse due to the humidity!!
It's an absolutely fantastic watch, and one that I would be more than proud to own. wink.gif

If I were to get a Tank, it would have to be the ref. W1551551 - I think it is the platinum version of your tank, if yours is the 30x39mm one.

Looks nice! As for temperatures reaching 40C... well, I'm in Tokyo, and I can assure you that in summer, many days at 39.9C were recorded each summer for the last few years ;)

post #19215 of 34712

hi guys, sporting this today...

 

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