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The Watch Appreciation Thread - Page 1246

post #18676 of 33526
Quote:
Originally Posted by dddrees View Post

Very nice, I can't wait to see what you dial looks like.

Did they give you any idea what exactly is going to be on it?

Thank you. Me too!

Well it's a bespoke dial so it's going to be an enamel painting of my beloved dog. I'm doing another one with a traditional Chinese painting with calligraphy.
post #18677 of 33526
Quote:
Originally Posted by in stitches View Post

~B~ - i think its very pretty. i agree with some of the criticism regarding the movement finishing, but its still very nice.

Thank you Stitches, I agree that the movement finishing could be improved. But it's still early days. The layout of the calibre itself is very nice, so that's a good start.
post #18678 of 33526
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kaplan View Post

This just gave me an idea: A thin bone china dial in a case with a display back. Would look white when worn, but held against a light source you'd be able to slightly glimpse the movement through the dial.

Though probably not a watch you'd wanna wear playing golf ;-)

Would be too thin. I've been discussing using a porcelain dial with the maker, and indeed it is possible. But the porcelain would have to be of a certain thickness to hold the hands and indices.
post #18679 of 33526
Quote:
Originally Posted by apropos View Post

Take all the time you need, you don't need to rush this decision!!

Is the USA TTR1931 really a "LE"? IIRC there was a number - 100 pieces - quoted and I find it a little difficult to imagine they still have stock lying around 2 years on.
Hmmm, not noticed anything on the usual fora I've been browsing.

100 pieces per year. Black strap for 2011, Brown cordovan for 2012. Mine is the brown.
post #18680 of 33526
Quote:
Originally Posted by ~ B ~ View Post


I like how the subdials on the 1815 echo the... erm... subdials on the other model.

icon_gu_b_slayer[1].gif

 

Meh.  The "subdials" on the other model are plastic - total reject as far as I'm concerned.  Also she has no buttocks, is too thin, doesn't appear to have a top lip, and bears a disturbing resemblance to Tom Cruise.  Frankly, Der Vaterland can do better.

 

And does.  There's no silicon in a Lange.  You can quote me on that. :)

post #18681 of 33526
Super long post, took time to read through every reply over the last week instead of skimming through photos!!
Quote:
Originally Posted by no frills View Post

Oh man, dddrees, as much as I hate putting on rubber I may have to make a concession for the Aquanaut...
I... see what you did there. snork[1].gif
Quote:
Originally Posted by atticus87 View Post

Hi everyone, 

I have been looking through this thread with much interest and have drawn my conclusion that many here agree that Lange watches are becoming the closest rivals to PP watches in this day. I personally have had the opportunity to have worn a few Lange's (Lange annual calendar in white gold, Lange 1 timezone, Lange 1 pink gold) and PP's (5296, 5960). While the Lange's are beautifully crafted and manufactured, specifically its movement, which possesses an almost incomparable amount of details and fineness, i continue to find Lange's to be a little too mechanical (pun intended), and missing that personal (emotional) attachment to them compared to a PP. 


Putting the brand or the price tag aside, I find the current range of Lange to be superior to PP, especially when it comes to the finishing of the movement and the amount of details that goes into making a Lange movement. Comparing the price tags of both watches, the decision is straightforward - Lange is the outright winner, with the prices of equivalent models close to 50% cheaper than its PP counterpart, however when comparing the full package, i will always choose the PP ahead of the Lange, while the Lange is an excellent and excellent watch, I have seldom been drawn to stopping in my path and just admiring it on my wrist, while this urge continues to resonate whenever i have a PP on my wrist. 


While this is my personal opinion, i would love to gather some feedback from you guys, am i the only one that feels this way?

Quote:
Originally Posted by bboysdontcryy View Post

Been thinking about this. Yay or nay?

Might have to sell off a couple of watches and top up to buy this. It's more expensive than many of my kidneys put together.
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)



Something like that is IMO a watch someone gets when he has "completed" his watch collection (sport, dress, rectangular, vintage, etc) and just needs that last thing to round things up nicely.

~ B ~ raises quite a few good points. Reliability and serviceability were the first things I thought as well. Red apples are not the same as green apples I know but medtech_expat has posted here about the problems he experienced with his FP Journes, which apparently eventually precipitated his movement away from the marque.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ~ B ~ View Post

I agree, I very much enjoy my Casa Fag edition 1931.
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
You should put up more pics of your new Rouge too! Thats a real showstopper.

Thank you.

I would post more photos of R, but it's having... stuff done to it now (good stuff). peepwall[1].gif
Quote:
Originally Posted by hanskl View Post


Thanks guys, I was not aware that this thread is mainly for mechanical watches.. I understand it would have been more valuable if it had not been a quartz, but I still holds sentimental value to me..

Is the manufacture of decent quality, taking into account its a quartz? I'm looking to replace the wrist band, any suggestions to what would look good with the watch?

Really appreciate your help!

I reread my earlier reply, which I find now to be rather brusque. I apologise as that was not my intent, but typing on a phone is hell.

Anyway, with a gold linen finish dial like that I would stick with dark non-brown colours - black, navy, dark green. I would go large reptile. I don't think there is a way to successfully "casualise" or "sportify" this watch if that is what you are looking for.
Quote:
Originally Posted by no frills View Post

Thanks. It seems only proper, 'no?  satisfied.gif


But seriously, the wife adores it. How could she not.

Nice!! Oh man. My wife to be would kill me if I ever surprised her with a perpetual calendar.
Edited by apropos - 3/6/13 at 5:18am
post #18682 of 33526
^

Thanks apropos, People forget that Vacheron got big in the 19th century by basically pioneering machine made watch production, thus allowing greater serviceability and reliability of watches, through tighter tolerances and parts availability. Prior to this, watches were benchmade essentially like a bespoke shoe is now. But a fiddleback sole is cheaper to make by hand than a balance cock for example.

Likewise with the Americans and Swiss during the machine-made/hand-made wars of the latter half of the 19th century.
post #18683 of 33526
Quote:
Originally Posted by apropos View Post

Yes, I was referring to JLC. I've been fortunate enough to handle some very very very exquisite examples of enamelwork from JLC, but at the same time I realise you are not charging $XXX,XXX for your watches, nor making them in editions of 1.

I asked about the dual escapement because I was wondering if they beat at different frequencies, or if this was an attempt at a resonance watch (and I say 'attempt' because they are too far apart!).

The screwed gold chatons I asked about because I found it a bit interesting that a thoroughly modern watch should have a nod to a now obsolete method of affixing jewels without the force of historical momentum like Lange.

I hope you do not mind, but I would like to make a suggestion - it would be great if there were dial finishes in traditional natural lacquer, as in lacquer derived from the lacquerwood tree, not epoxy resin. As you are doubtless aware, there is a strong history of lacquerware in China and I think given this is not a single watchmaker driven operation but more a boutique watch company that would help in establishing your niche, as well as a brand identity. Other random ideas that have popped into my head include huanghuali marquetry, or MOP in wood marquetry as is commonly found in Chinese furniture. Or perhaps fine porcelain.

Well JLC and Patek to my knowledge both get their enamel dials done by the same workshop in Europe, as do almost all Swiss/German watch brands. From what I have seen comparing the two workshops in Switzerland and Beijing, the Chinese one uses thinner gold wire, thus yielding finer detail. Ultimately, it depends on the painting chosen on whether this quality is apparent to the naked eye and loupe.

Personally I think a resonance watch is rather pointless, so never thought of making or buying one.

Well Lange and Glashuette tradition itself learnt the use of chatons from the British who used them in movements a century before the Germans. Lange themselves admit that with synthetic rubies now, the chatons serve only a decorative function, as do mechanical watches in general. And I do think my watch is more traditional than thoroughly modern, with the likes of Urwerk and De Bethune occupying the latter category.

No please, give all the feedback you can! I truly appreciate it as that is the only way we can improve. I will be using actual celadon and Yixing clay as a dial in my watches and will be sourcing this from the fourth-generation artisan who makes my handmade tea ware, which is then shipped to the north of China to be assembled in the watches. Lacquer will be a possibility as well in future. I have discussed this with the makers and it is no problem.

MOP is a cinch, it has been done in watches costing 200 USD even. Fine porcelain has also already been done by the makers working for me - I think the result is incredible.

My intention all along was to tie Chinese watchmaking with other ancient fine traditions like marquetry as you mentioned, porcelain ware, ink and brush painting and poetry et al. China has a long history of watch and clock making stretching back 600 years, and the modern history began in 1955 with four old watchmakers assembling a single piece freehand with no prior designs in a little room in Tianjin.

Also, I wanted to add that the watches shown above are my own personal watches commissioned with the maker. While I will be using these same movements in the watches of my CELADON brand, I wanted to test the watches firsthand and only if they pass my standards do they deserve a place in the pantheon of Maison CELADON.
post #18684 of 33526
Quote:
Originally Posted by ~ B ~ View Post

^

Thanks apropos, People forget that Vacheron got big in the 19th century by basically pioneering machine made watch production, thus allowing greater serviceability and reliability of watches, through tighter tolerances and parts availability. Prior to this, watches were benchmade essentially like a bespoke shoe is now. But a fiddleback sole is cheaper to make by hand than a balance cock for example.

Likewise with the Americans and Swiss during the machine-made/hand-made wars of the latter half of the 19th century.

Yep yep - agree 100%!

On a related note there are those who complain about Patek using variations of the the cal. 240 in nearly every model in their current lineup, and in the vast majority of their models over the last 30 or so years from time only models to grand complications. They say that PP should be more like Lange - who IIRC case (or nearly case) 1 unique movement per watch model - i.e. every (or nearly every) model has a different movement.

IMO, Lange's practice is good for perceived value and laying down trump cards in heated WIS discussions, but not so good if you're planning on keeping your watch for 30 years and more importantly - if reliability is a concern. I like the fact that PP keeps making incremental improvements to the cal. 240, attempting to perfect it instead of reinventing the wheel for every new model.

Knock on wood, should PP go belly up I know there will be a ready supply of modules and parts for the base 240 calibre. Can't say that about Lange. Now magnify that potential issue a million times or so and you have the situation with most independents.

I know I have said before that I would love a Dornblueth but that's really only because the vast majority carry (beautifully refinished) Unitas - easy to service, rock solid reliability. I nearly got a Quintus Klassik but on second thought I think I may have dodged a bullet. The only other true independent I would consider seriously - because I still have moments of temporary insanity - might be Roger Smith.
post #18685 of 33526
Not nearly as interesting as what I have seen in this thread lately (simple, but nicely decorated Unitas) but I like it, and it goes with what I am wearing today

post #18686 of 33526

^^ I really like that.

post #18687 of 33526
Quote:
Originally Posted by apropos View Post

I would post more photos of R, but it's having... stuff done to it now (good stuff). peepwall[1].gif

So, are you having your SF avatar engraved on the back?
post #18688 of 33526
Quote:
Originally Posted by ~ B ~ View Post


I like how the subdials on the 1815 echo the... erm... subdials on the other model.

icon_gu_b_slayer[1].gif

 

This is a brilliant observation!

post #18689 of 33526
Quote:
Originally Posted by Newcomer View Post

Interesting. See, I actually prefer the 5140. Although I do love the 3940, the 5140 feels more balanced in regards to the north-south, and east-west orientations. I find the "north" of the 3940 to be a little bit stark and empty.

This is probably going to sound really stupid, but perhaps some numbers can help me? I feel like with the 5140, you have a "2" on the west, and a "2" on the east (with "1" being the standard unit of measurement. It is just supposed to be a proportional analysis). Additionally, with the north you have a "1" with the bigger text, and the south a "3" with the bigger moonphase. I feel like the north-south and east-west are balanced, even though the south of the dial is more occupied than the north.

As for the 3940, I will give east and west a "2," and the north maybe a ".75" and the south a "2.5."

I don't think this made any sense. But I swear in my head it sounds good. Also, I find the "busy"-ness of the moonphase in the 3940 to be a bit overwhelming in lieu of the simplicity of the other subdials.

This is, of course, picking the pickiest of nits.

 

You know, I do get your point.  The "blank space" versus "busyness" aesthetic certainly represents a trade-off.  Again, this is such a personal preference and I border on nitpicky.  I think anyone would be fortunate to have either a 3940 or a 5140.

post #18690 of 33526
Quote:
Originally Posted by apropos View Post


Yep yep - agree 100%!

On a related note there are those who complain about Patek using variations of the the cal. 240 in nearly every model in their current lineup, and in the vast majority of their models over the last 30 or so years from time only models to grand complications. They say that PP should be more like Lange - who IIRC case (or nearly case) 1 unique movement per watch model - i.e. every (or nearly every) model has a different movement.

IMO, Lange's practice is good for perceived value and laying down trump cards in heated WIS discussions, but not so good if you're planning on keeping your watch for 30 years and more importantly - if reliability is a concern. I like the fact that PP keeps making incremental improvements to the cal. 240, attempting to perfect it instead of reinventing the wheel for every new model.

Knock on wood, should PP go belly up I know there will be a ready supply of modules and parts for the base 240 calibre. Can't say that about Lange. Now magnify that potential issue a million times or so and you have the situation with most independents.

I know I have said before that I would love a Dornblueth but that's really only because the vast majority carry (beautifully refinished) Unitas - easy to service, rock solid reliability. I nearly got a Quintus Klassik but on second thought I think I may have dodged a bullet. The only other true independent I would consider seriously - because I still have moments of temporary insanity - might be Roger Smith.

 

Excellent point here about serviceability and availability of parts.  I fully intend to keep my PPs alive for well past my own lifetime, so I want to stack the cards in favor of my kids being able to have them serviced in the future.

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