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The Watch Appreciation Thread - Page 1155

post #17311 of 39072
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dino944 View Post

The Explorer is a classic.  I had one for almost 10 years.  For many years I've worn some form of Rolex sport watch as a daily wearer, and they have never let me down. 

 

I bought the 114270 pre-owned.  I love the 36mm size - perfect for my smallish 6.25" wrist.

post #17312 of 39072
Quote:
Originally Posted by europrep View Post

Apologies for the subpar pic via the iPhone. CVDK most days for me.  

 

 

+1 - woh, very nice.

post #17313 of 39072
Quote:
Originally Posted by no frills View Post

 

I bought the 114270 pre-owned.  I love the 36mm size - perfect for my smallish 6.25" wrist.

Mine was also a 114270, great watch.  I purchased it new, but back then it only cost $2,850.  With all the price increases most of mine (all purchased new) only cost about half of what the list prices are today.  Mine wasn't getting much wrist time in the last few years, I was wearing my Ex2 and Sub more so I found it a new home. 

post #17314 of 39072

Just picked up my first Sinn (Flieger 356 with display back). I think I'm in love. Please ignore my logo, its for my strap hustle.

 

post #17315 of 39072
The dial is actually a really nice black, but on some angles looks blue due to the anti-reflective coating..
Quote:
Originally Posted by no frills View Post

Thanks for sharing - does the IWC have a blue or a black dial?  Have a good weekend!
post #17316 of 39072
Nice looking SINN

Quote:
Originally Posted by dicee View Post

Just picked up my first Sinn (Flieger 356 with display back). I think I'm in love. Please ignore my logo, its for my strap hustle.


post #17317 of 39072
Quote:
Originally Posted by suaviter View Post

What model is this?  That looks great and I've been looking for something simple/dressy/reasonably priced and this looks like a winner.

I love it - and it has blue hands that don't show in the photo.

It's a Stowa Antea 365 on mid brown croc strap with deployment buckle. 7" wrist.
post #17318 of 39072
Quote:
Originally Posted by dicee View Post

Just picked up my first Sinn (Flieger 356 with display back). I think I'm in love. Please ignore my logo, its for my strap hustle.



Very nice!
post #17319 of 39072
Quote:
Originally Posted by europrep View Post

Apologies for the subpar pic via the iPhone. CVDK most days for me.  



That's really nice. Do you bother to keep the moonphase in synch or just let it run however?
post #17320 of 39072
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dino944 View Post

Yes, I remember the article by Walt Odets, I believe he was reviewing an Rolex Explorer. 

I agree complete, if stuck on a desert island or traveling to a remote area I'd want a Rolex.  In addition to being rugged, I remember someone also saying if something happens and you need money or goods, a Rolex works as currency in any country.  You can easily trade or sell it for necessities because everyone knows the brand name...your probably can't say the same for VC, Breguet, Philippe Dufour, or Journe etc.
The comparison I'd use regarding the Odets review is to a wealthy wine enthusiast reviewing a top-class IPA by Grand Cru Bordeaux criteria. He's an amateur horlogerie lover with a taste for hand finishing who didn't really have an appreciation of the fundamental difference between a machine-finished Rolex movement and a elaborately-decorated hand-finished movement; they're as distinct as wine and beer. Rolex is all about absolute precision of manufacture, which is not something that's easy to assess for an amateur and has nothing to do with decoration. That particualr 3000 movement was certainly rough-looking in spots (I have no idea where the marks on the balance weights would have come from, though) but it still had exemplary stability and positional error. They might not have been the most nicely-finished jewel seats, but that watch wouldn't have put in a performance like that if they weren't in precisely the right place.

I think his review was well-intentioned, but when he says "ease of service" and "minimal parts count" like they're undesirable things, it's clear that his taste for complicated, highly-decorated movements makes him overlook the factors that make the machine-finished function-first movement so unbeatable in daily use. The engineering that goes into them is the best in the industry, and especially these days, there's nobody even similar in price who takes quality control and true Swiss manufacturing as seriously. To be fair, the 3000 was not exactly the best effort in Rolex's history, either, but it still delivers on the real-world criteria of reliability, accuracy and toughness.
Edited by Belligero - 1/26/13 at 4:05am
post #17321 of 39072
Quote:
Originally Posted by Christian B View Post


One of the more humorous articles I've read in a while, esp. this I've found true:

"Oh this? Yeah. Better be. Sixteen grand, right here. Ha. This is just my walking-around watch, you know? A little Tourneau, a little something. It's nice, but I don't give a fuck if I lose it, you know? I'll go out drinking in this watch. The Patek Phillippes, I keep at home. I only break those out on special occasions. Just for little parties and shit like this, I got this one, I got the Movado, I got the B-vvv-lgari, and I got the Vacheron. That one, I bought at the auction. People don't know about Vacheron. You got guys out there, they think Rolex is the thing. They think Rollies are like the nicest watch there is. That's amateur hour. Me, I don't even own a Rolex. Rolex makes you look like an asshole. Every time I see a guy in a Rolex I walk up to him and say, 'You see this? This is a fucking Richard Mille. This right here is worth more than ten of your shitty Rolexes.' Then I laugh at him and walk away. This watch thing is really about taste."

My father got a Omega Seamaster Planet Ocean XL, Panerai PAM00372 and a gold/metal Rolex Datejust, he must be the devil to you guys. lol8[1].gif

Your choice of words a little harsh, but funnycrackup[1].gif" Watch out for the lynch-mob"

post #17322 of 39072
Quote:
Originally Posted by academe View Post

Speak for yourself mate! biggrin.gif

No no, I'm a different species altogether; I don't have the money for four-figure watches, look at those who do in envy and thus like articles like this.
post #17323 of 39072
Quote:
Originally Posted by Belligero View Post

The comparison I'd use regarding the Odets review is to a wealthy wine enthusiast reviewing a top-class IPA by Grand Cru Bordeaux criteria. He's an amateur horlogerie lover with a taste for hand finishing who didn't really have an appreciation of the fundamental difference between a machine-finished Rolex movement and a elaborately-decorated hand-finished movement; they're as distinct as wine and beer. Rolex is all about absolute precision of manufacture, which is not something that's easy to assess for an amateur and has nothing to do with decoration. That particualr 3000 movement was certainly rough-looking in spots (I have no idea where the marks on the balance weights would have come from, though) but it still had exemplary stability and positional error. They might not have been the most nicely-finished jewel seats, but that watch wouldn't have put in a performance like that if they weren't in precisely the right place.

I think his review was well-intentioned, but when he says "ease of service" and "minimal parts count" like they're undesirable things, it's clear that his taste for complicated, highly-decorated movements makes him overlook the factors that make the machine-finished function-first movement so unbeatable in daily use. The engineering that goes into them is the best in the industry, and especially these days, there's nobody even similar in price who takes quality control and true Swiss manufacturing as seriously. To be fair, the 3000 was not exactly the best effort in Rolex's history, either, but it still delivers on the real-world criteria of reliability, accuracy and toughness.

Nice analysis, I'd like to add to that one must also consider the sheer scale of Rolex's operation - this isn't some small operation with a low five or high four figure production figure a year, this is an industrial operation in every sense of the word with production approaching a million a year.

Sure, it bites for those who bought a Rolex thinking/hoping that they were now part of an exclusive/rarefied club, but, well Rolex is what it is - a good and storied producer of fine tool watches with machine-made workhorse movements and sumptuous case finishing.
post #17324 of 39072
Quote:
Originally Posted by apropos View Post

Nice analysis, I'd like to add to that one must also consider the sheer scale of Rolex's operation - this isn't some small operation with a low five or high four figure production figure a year, this is an industrial operation in every sense of the word with production approaching a million a year.

Sure, it bites for those who bought a Rolex thinking/hoping that they were now part of an exclusive/rarefied club, but, well Rolex is what it is - a good and storied producer of fine tool watches with machine-made workhorse movements and sumptuous case finishing.[/quote]

This is what i find the most sad about the whole status symbol thing that rolex has no become a part off. IMO most people who will buy a Rolex will do it as a way to show some form of prestige, and Rolex as i believe you mentioned earlier will catch a lot of flak especially from those "Rookie WIS" guys when it should be looked at for what it is: a manufacturer with a great history and near bulletproof watches that can be worn in almost every occasion on almost any part of the planet.
post #17325 of 39072
Personally, I love my Rolex Explorer 114270 with its 3130 movement. A good watch for me is one I don't have to think about. Besides, the idea of accurate time representation on your wrist "is a confidence game invented by the Swiss". I defy anyone to tell me which movie that quote came from. Years ago I used to wear a gold Rolex Submariner. While tending bar at First Avenue in MPLS during Prince's heyday an elderly gentleman came up to me and asked for the time. With much fanfare and exaggerated movement I pulled back my sleeve like a magician so all could see my "precious". In a radio announcers voice I told the old geezer that it was 11:15pm. He pulled back his sleeve also. On his wrist was a beaten and battered Timex W-1. With a smirk on his face he looked at me and said, "Yep, your right". Of course I want a Breguet, and several Patek's. A handmade Dufour would be nice too. But my Rolex just keeps working.
Edited by BeSpiffington - 1/26/13 at 11:01am
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