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The Watch Appreciation Thread (Reviews and Photos of Men's Timepieces by Rolex, Patek Philippe, Breitling, JLC etc...) - Page 3205  

post #48061 of 48312

Ah didn't realise you were a Weegie...well don't wear that one home anyway :hide:

post #48062 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by mimo View Post

Ah didn't realise you were a Weegie...well don't wear that one home anyway peepwall%5B1%5D.gif
Don't worry no one in Glasgow would think it's real smile.gif
post #48063 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by OmarDubaibanker View Post


Booooooooooom!

Yikes - awesome kop.
post #48064 of 48312
Not to venture too far off-topic: I watch very little auto racing aside from some F1 coverage...and the Rolex branding is everywhere on those tracks.

They've definitely got their share of commercial spots during the race, too.

(I mean, you know, in case somebody's never heard of Rolex LOL).
post #48065 of 48312
Keith brings up an interesting question, which was answered a while back on Reddit.

Here's the top answer to "why does Coca Cola still advertise?"

I discovered some years ago that the point of most advertising at a certain marque level was not to acquire new customers, but to retain them or even stop "buyer's regret".

For example, BMW pretty much never expect somebody to see one of their adverts and think "Oh, that car looks good, I'll buy one of those!", because who the hell makes a purchasing decision of that size based on advertising? Most of their advertising is actually focused on people who recently bought one of their cars and is sat there thinking how much of a Ford or GM they could have got for 40% less. It prevents buyer's regret, and pushes them from just a buyer into a brand-loyal fan. It also enhances brand value in general, which is critical when establishing how much your brand is worth financially.

Brand value is where Coca-Cola come in. Frequently in the UK people will say "it feels like Christmas now", once the "Christmas is coming" Coke ad with santa on lorries going through town is aired. Think about how powerful that is: people associate the celebration of the Messiah's birth, or perhaps the most intense emotional experience of the year that you can point to on a calendar, with a can of sugar water.

When you hear "Coke", you immediately think of the colours of the can, the taste of the drink, and have an emotional response which is probably very happy, positive and affirming. That's what a lifetime of Coca-Cola telling you what they stand for has done to you.

Recipe-wise, it's almost identical to Pepsi, but think about how you feel when you think of Pepsi, and how you feel when you think of Coca-Cola. That difference? That's the advertising. And it kicks in when you're stood in front of a fridge about to make a purchasing decision.

Most of the Coca-Cola sold around the World is produced under license, it doesn't come from a magic well, and is relatively easy to synthesise. So how much would the company be worth if it weren't anything special? Their entire advertising strategy is to increase brand value which also helps them whenever a customer hesitates about buying their product.
post #48066 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by Keith T View Post

Not to venture too far off-topic: I watch very little auto racing aside from some F1 coverage...and the Rolex branding is everywhere on those tracks.

They've definitely got their share of commercial spots during the race, too.

(I mean, you know, in case somebody's never heard of Rolex LOL).

With the 24 hours of Daytona (another Rolex sponsored event), the winners get steel Daytonas.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Moo View Post

Keith brings up an interesting question, which was answered a while back on Reddit.

Here's the top answer to "why does Coca Cola still advertise?"

I discovered some years ago that the point of most advertising at a certain marque level was not to acquire new customers, but to retain them or even stop "buyer's regret".

For example, BMW pretty much never expect somebody to see one of their adverts and think "Oh, that car looks good, I'll buy one of those!", because who the hell makes a purchasing decision of that size based on advertising? Most of their advertising is actually focused on people who recently bought one of their cars and is sat there thinking how much of a Ford or GM they could have got for 40% less. It prevents buyer's regret, and pushes them from just a buyer into a brand-loyal fan. It also enhances brand value in general, which is critical when establishing how much your brand is worth financially.

Most of the Coca-Cola sold around the World is produced under license, it doesn't come from a magic well, and is relatively easy to synthesise. So how much would the company be worth if it weren't anything special? Their entire advertising strategy is to increase brand value which also helps them whenever a customer hesitates about buying their product.

Certainly interesting.  Although, I can't say advertising has had any of that effect on me, although maybe I'm just that odd percent they don't quite reach.

 

I've never seen a BMW ad (or other car advertisement), watched it and thought to myself, "Oh, now I'm feeling much better about having purchased the car I bought."  Although, I suppose I can understand people feeling some brand loyalty or excitement if they see the car they bought, doing some high performance driving and out performing a competitor.  For the most part if I watch a commercial I want to be entertained, and I prefer funny commercials to anything else.  However, that doesn't mean I'd buy something from the brand with funnier advertising.  It might mean if I find a commercial entertaining, I might be less likely to change the channel when I see it starting.   I liked the Jaguar ad "Its good to be bad," but it didn't influence our last sports car purchase. 

 

As for Coca Cola or Pepsi, I could drink either.  Neither has any special meaning or association for me. 

 

I also think that some advertising, is simply to keep others from advertising at an event.  If Rolex sponsors something, then you won't see TAG or Omega at that event.  

 

Anyway, very cool ideas about advertising.  Cheers!

post #48067 of 48312
Wow.....thoughtful responses to a throwaway comment.

You gotta love it!


So .... I'm going to post this Explorer on NATO pic, for no real reason whatsoever:


post #48068 of 48312
@KeithT that's one of the first Rollie/NATO combos that's actually jumped out at me that I kinda like. Nice… what year is that?
post #48069 of 48312
Since we are talking about advertising, I believe a huge piece is, "out of sight out mind." The reality is that people forget pretty quickly and there are innumerable different people/companies trying get our attention. Fact is, if we arent reminded by these companies that they exist, we will forget and turn our attention towards someone else who grabbed our minds eye.

Aside from people who naturally investigate every single decision they make, probably the vast majority of people here and yet the vast minority of most people on the planet, the advertisements we see on a daily basis surely have a direct impact on many peoples decision making and purchase making choices.
post #48070 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by in stitches View Post

Aside from people who naturally investigate every single decision they make

Hello and welcome to my life
post #48071 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by Keith T View Post

Wow.....thoughtful responses to a throwaway comment.

You gotta love it!


So .... I'm going to post this Explorer on NATO pic, for no real reason whatsoever:



Guy at my work has been wearing his like this... it looks great!
post #48072 of 48312
Moo makes some interesting points.

Stitches your comments remind of that Seinfeld episode where George constantly tries to leave imprints of himself by repeating "COS-tan-ZA!!" I think a lot of advertisement is based on volume/beating you over the head. They're not targeting our demographic, but rather the other vast majority who's going to subconsciously remember that extra bit of advertising they saw way back, and most likely will have tipped the scales just so slightly to influence whatever buying decision..


Quote:
Originally Posted by in stitches View Post

Since we are talking about advertising, I believe a huge piece is, "out of sight out mind." The reality is that people forget pretty quickly and there are innumerable different people/companies trying get our attention. Fact is, if we arent reminded by these companies that they exist, we will forget and turn our attention towards someone else who grabbed our minds eye.

Aside from people who naturally investigate every single decision they make, probably the vast majority of people here and yet the vast minority of most people on the planet, the advertisements we see on a daily basis surely have a direct impact on many peoples decision making and purchase making choices.
post #48073 of 48312
We think it's always the other guy who is influenced by advertising.

Well there must be lots of other guys or why would a company keep on spending so much money telling us we never own their product we are just looking after it for the next generation,

Of course advertising works,
post #48074 of 48312

There are definitely lots of clever ads that work on many people.  I've seen plenty of young wealthy international students, who buy watches, clothes, or cars because their favorite celebrity has those items.  So clearly the brand ambassador/advertising thing works with certain consumers.  

 

Patek's ad is very good, but I don't have kids.  So while that ad probably motivates a lot of watch collecting parents (or people who plan to be parents) it just doesn't motivate me to purchase one of their pieces. I like some of their pieces, but instead went with VCs and an AP.  

 

As I said before, ads don't influence me in the way that Mr. Moo suggested.  I didn't say they have no influence on me.  Perhaps in thinking about it, they affect me in a way that is along the lines of what Stichy was describing,  The biggest influence an ad has on me is letting me know that a new product is available. Maybe it was a brand or model that I previously overlooked, and then I see something I like and start to look further into that brand/model.  So in that way an ad could show me additional options that could result in my purchasing something different than what was originally planned. Cheers!

post #48075 of 48312
Agree on advertising working especially well when informing me of a new item I like, which in turn usually reestablishes my interest in the brand as a whole.
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