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The Watch Appreciation Thread (Reviews and Photos of Men's Timepieces by Rolex, Patek Philippe, Breitling, JLC etc...) - Page 3101  

post #46501 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tried and True View Post


The easiest way to explain why the Royal Oak's popularly has risen head and shoulders above its Big Three competitors is through pictures. Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)









Brand ambassadors, may help get these watches out in the eyes of the public and explain recognizability, but I'm not sure it explains their popularity.  Brad Pitt, John Mayer, Paul McCartney, Charlie Sheen (a former VC collector) or Eric Clapton have all been seen and photographed wearing Patek's on magazine covers or during interviews.  Celebrities might be part of the answer, at least with Offshore models, but I don't think it truly explains the popularity of the RO .  

post #46502 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by Keith T View Post

To me, the intriguing aspects of that watch ( non-Offshore, at least....none of that craziness) would be the Genta design, the slim movement, etc.

+1

 

I'm not a fan of Offshores.  So who wears them (or who wears a Patek, VC, JLC, Piaget, Rolex or any other brand) is irrelevant to me.  Unless Lebron, Usher, Brad Pitt, etc are going to foot the bill for my next watch purchase, why should anything they do or wear influence me?   Purchasing something because some actor, musician, or athlete has it, is something people should have out grown while in grade school.    

post #46503 of 48312
Is there any love here for Panerai anymore?

I've always liked their pvd/dlc models as well as the 1950's case. Now comes the 617, albeit in a gargantuan 47mm.
post #46504 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by jhcam8 View Post



tifosi, I know you like the smaller pieces. I like some 38's in a dress watch and the Cellini is 1 mm larger.


There's lots of choice in the price range. I've lost a ton of money flipping and have decided to stick to brands (brands? - maybe 2) that I have a chance of recouping most of my outlay.
Rolex is one.
And I happen to like the Cellini's which can be worn with most outfits, not only very dressy ones. biggrin.gif

Just to agree with Dino; you will not be seeing that same Rolex Oyster recouping with the Cellini. And I think strike two is the fact that it's a precious metal. 

 

I agree that I don't want a dress only watch either. I want something a little versatile as well. I also want something gold and at the top of my list at the moment is the Cartier - Louis Cartier Tank. I'm not sure how well that straddles the casual/dress line, yet, though. 

post #46505 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dino944 View Post
 

+1

 

I'm not a fan of Offshores.  So who wears them (or who wears a Patek, VC, JLC, Piaget, Rolex or any other brand) is irrelevant to me.  Unless Lebron, Usher, Brad Pitt, etc are going to foot the bill for my next watch purchase, why should anything they do or wear influence me?   Purchasing something because some actor, musician, or athlete has it, is something people should have out grown while in grade school.    


I think the point is more about maybe why they've become more recognizable by comparison. I think popularity is the wrong word there from T&T, though maybe not, it does introduce someone to the brand who may not have considered it before, or maybe even a nice watch before, so maybe it is the right word. I would assume 99% of this thread do not make purchases based on celebrity endorsements, but we are an odd collection of people haha.

post #46506 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by Belligero View Post


Good question.

Future classics among new designs?

To be honest, I struggle to see much of what's been drafted post-quartz becoming as well-regarded as the designs originating from pre-quartz era. Now that the mechanical wristwatch is essentially a pure luxury item, new companies seem to be resorting to infantile gimmicks to try to be different, such putting little bits of airplane in the case. Plagiarism is rampant, too — there's very little originality out there.

Among the few non-biters, MB&F and Urwerk may develop a niche following, but I doubt it will ever be significant, and they'll almost certainly be forgotten by the mid-21st century. Likewise, Greubel Forsey and a few other high-end independents make stupendous watches, but the production is so limited and the cost is so high that they're another non-factor.

FP Journe and Lange both have a distinctive and consistent design language that should age quite gracefully. I could see Nomos becoming a bit of a cult classic due to their combination of good design, quality and accessibility. Tudor has a chance now that they’re making some good movements of their own, but they’re still very weak in the design department.

There's not much else that immediately comes to mind. Richard Mille watches, though recognizable, are very likely going to look as badly dated as those '70s/'80s elliptical jobs above, as will many of the trendy Royal Oak Offshores, Hublots, IWCs, and so many others.

Of course, that's just my opinion — I could be wrong. :P


Nomos, Journe, and Lange were my immediate thoughts, though I struggle to imagine modern watches become collector classics. But those 3 have the most to offer design wise while being able to stand the test of time IMO.

post #46507 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dino944 View Post

Celebrities might be part of the answer, at least with Offshore models, but I don't think it truly explains the popularity of the RO .  
Often times when people visit a store in response to an advert they end up buying something other than that which was advertised.
post #46508 of 48312

If Nomos moved their seconds subdial down a mm or two, I may warm up to them.  The way I see if, if you like Nomos then you have to like some of what Montblanc is putting out as they have that same smushed into the center of the dial feel to them.  As I mentioned, I saw them in person and while I wanted to like the GMT, I did not like it in person.

 

The Lange 1815 is great if it isn't a classic already so that is my call.

post #46509 of 48312
Comparing Nomos to Montblanc!? That's harsh — to Nomos, obviously. smile.gif

There's a good reason that Nomos subdials are slightly inboard; the date wheel encircles the rest of the movement, rather than being stacked on top of it. This makes for a very slim movement with a larger diameter, with the same seconds post positioning as the non-date.



Also, the non-date looks perfect:



Montblanc simply puts a tiny movement in a big case and hopes nobody will notice.
post #46510 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbarwick View Post
 

If Nomos moved their seconds subdial down a mm or two, I may warm up to them.  The way I see if, if you like Nomos then you have to like some of what Montblanc is putting out as they have that same smushed into the center of the dial feel to them.  As I mentioned, I saw them in person and while I wanted to like the GMT, I did not like it in person.

 

The Lange 1815 is great if it isn't a classic already so that is my call.


Depends on the model and size, so I have to disagree with the way you see it. I don't love everything they put out, but the subseconds work on some models more than others (Zurich Welzeit for instance) due to the overall design and then their smaller sized cases and tetra models. So I think the models where the subseconds either flow with the design, or where it fits the case size, they could age quite well.

post #46511 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by Belligero View Post

Comparing Nomos to Montblanc!? That's harsh — to Nomos, obviously. smile.gif

There's a good reason that Nomos subdials are slightly inboard; the date wheel encircles the rest of the movement, rather than being stacked on top of it. This makes for a very slim movement with a larger diameter, with the same seconds post positioning as the non-date.
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)



Also, the non-date looks perfect:



Montblanc simply puts a tiny movement in a big case and hopes nobody will notice.

 

While I'm not a fan of day counters, I like the way they look in Nomos models. I like the way the fit under thesubseconds dial in the larger models. It took seeing the date models in person for me to come to that conclusion though. Never thought I'd like the Metro, then I put it on my wrist and it was just brilliant. They aren't watches for people looking for "wrist presence" but they are a pretty great design mechanically and aesthetically if you like simplicity and functionality.

post #46512 of 48312

The Minimatik (pictured above) is 35.5mm according to Nomos and looks fine with their DUW 3001 movement.  

 

The Tangente 33 and standard 35 look fine with the Alpha movement but when you put the Alpha movement in the Tangente 38 it looks like the Montblanc piece with a small movement in a larger case.  The Date versions use their Beta movement which to my very untrained eye is similar to the Alpha with a Date wheel slapped on it.

post #46513 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbarwick View Post
The Date versions use their Beta movement which to my very untrained eye is similar to the Alpha with a Date wheel slapped on it.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Belligero View Post

There's a good reason that Nomos subdials are slightly inboard; the date wheel encircles the rest of the movement, rather than being stacked on top of it. This makes for a very slim movement with a larger diameter, with the same seconds post positioning as the non-date.
post #46514 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by DLJr View Post


I think the point is more about maybe why they've become more recognizable by comparison. I think popularity is the wrong word there from T&T, though maybe not, it does introduce someone to the brand who may not have considered it before, or maybe even a nice watch before, so maybe it is the right word. I would assume 99% of this thread do not make purchases based on celebrity endorsements, but we are an odd collection of people haha.

Agreed, "Recognizable" probably would have been the better description.  Although, in addition to celebs wearing them I think the RO being in existence for nearly 25 years longer than the Overseas also has something to do with its recognizability.  

 

Interestingly, AP's slogan through the 1980's was "Known only by those who know."  Perhaps they dropped it because now everybody knows...;)

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tried and True View Post

Often times when people visit a store in response to an advert they end up buying something other than that which was advertised.

Yes, that is true in many circumstances.  Although, I'm not sure that has been the cause of the RO's recognizability or popularity or whatever you want to call it.   I've been to many watch shops that sold AP, PP, and VC, ....so someone could walk in having seen a celebrity wearing a RO Offshore,  and they could have just as easily have walked out wearing some form of Nautilus or Overseas.  

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Belligero View Post


Good question.

Future classics among new designs?

To be honest, I struggle to see much of what's been drafted post-quartz becoming as well-regarded as the designs originating from pre-quartz era. Now that the mechanical wristwatch is essentially a pure luxury item, new companies seem to be resorting to infantile gimmicks to try to be different, such putting little bits of airplane in the case. Plagiarism is rampant, too — there's very little originality out there.

Among the few non-biters, MB&F and Urwerk may develop a niche following, but I doubt it will ever be significant, and they'll almost certainly be forgotten by the mid-21st century. Likewise, Greubel Forsey and a few other high-end independents make stupendous watches, but the production is so limited and the cost is so high that they're another non-factor.
...

Anything too moderns like Richard Mille, MB&F, Urwerk, are never going to be classics.  They will be a foot note in history about what modern designs looked like.  Some of their things remind me of old Sci Fi shows like Space 1999, from when I was a kid.  As a kid it seemed amazing to see what they thought the world would look like in 25 years.  Now seeing an episode in rerun, its almost comical how dated all of their ideas were for the direction of the future.  I think most current futuristic looking watches will seem much the same.  Most items today that are considered classics (in the world of watches) have designs that are somewhat traditional and are appealing whether they were made in the 1920s, 1950s, 1960's or now.  Consider a Cartier Tank, a Patek Calatrava, or a Speedy Pro.  Any of them could have been made decades ago or today, but they their designs are still handsome and relevant today.  Perhaps the challenge for any current offerings to become classics is whether future generations will care about watches, or rely on iPhones/computers or whatever the current gadget of the times will be.  

post #46515 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by DLJr View Post
 

 

 

 

The Tangente 33 and Tangente 38 use the same Alpha movement.  In essence they are shoving a little movement in a big case but a whole 5mm difference.  In all honesty I thought I was going to find out the exact size of the Montblanc movement people bitch about then compare it to the 40 mm case size.  I then realized their movement is probabaly 30mm as their case looks to have at least 5mm on each size of the movement from the backside view.  

 

Maybe harsh on my part to compare Nomos to Montblanc but the Tangente 38 looks off compared to the Tangente 33 or the Minimatik Belli tried to throw in which is smaller and uses a different movement.

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