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The Watch Appreciation Thread (Reviews and Photos of Men's Timepieces by Rolex, Patek Philippe, Breitling, JLC etc...) - Page 2819  

post #42271 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dino944 View Post

As for OQs, its was probably the most over engineered and well built Rolex in its day, even with a quartz movement.   Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
It had advances that took decades to make it into Daytonas, Subs and GMTs.  It was the first steel Rolex to have a sapphire synthetic crystal, the first steel Rolex to use solid links for its bracelets, it was more antimagnetic than a Milgauss , and it even those it was a quartz it used an 11 jewel movement  IIRC it was water resistant to 100m when most were water resistant to 50m.   No watch can be everything to everyone. So quartz clearly won't be for everyone.  However just for comparison sake when you look at these movements, one can see the Rolex quartz movement isn't what you find in average to inexpensive quartz watches. edificemovement.jpg
OQ1aw.jpg

Indeed, I caught up with my watchmaker friend earlier this week, and we talked a fair bit about the OQ. One thing he mentioned is that it's by far the most costly-to-produce three-hand movement Rolex has ever made — and possibly the costliest, period. He commented that the 4130 isn't exactly cheap to make either, but only the 4160 might be comparable in internal expense to the quartz calibres. I guess there's a reason its price was double that of a Submariner's when it came out. When you consider its low production and that it's one of a kind for Rolex in almost every way, it's surprisingly how little they go for currently compared to other models.

I found it interesting that the cal. 9001 annual calendar isn't as expensive to make as the chronographs, either — it uses a very simple (and extremely well-designed) mechanism, which is its genius. I'd like to see the Sky-Dweller's movement in a less-bulky steel case sometime, but I doubt that will happen any time soon.

Anyway, he's quite familiar with the 5035/5055 calibres after getting specailized training on them at Rolex's advanced course in Geneva (where the 4030 movement is also covered and where he got the aforementioned info). He ended up liking the Oysterquartz a lot — so much so that he asked me to find a good 17000 for him, which I recently managed to do. It's difficult to find one that hasn't lost its bevels on the case and bracelet, but they're out there for those with patience. Now it's just a matter of getting it over to Norway.

smile.gif
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cant kill da Rooster View Post

The dial aside and I do like that dial, an 11mm thickness on a chrono must impress. No?

Thin is good, but at 11.8 mm. it's barely slimmer than a Daytona, which is a seriously water-resistant watch. I still don't get why they did this design in 42 mm; it would have looked much better in a case that fits the movement. It's always nice to see something on the restrained side from them, but for me, the combination of trendy sizing with a pseudo-retro look makes it a bit of a meaningless watch.

I reckon the 38 mm EP model is a much better buy, funky overlapping subdials and all. It's distinctly Zenith, whereas the two-register doesn't seem to have much of an identity.

post #42272 of 48312
I like this one, but pretty sure it gets filed under "case too big for movement"

post #42273 of 48312
^
I've seen worse. They moved the date wheel outboard on that version to help adapt it to bigger case, but the whole movement would have to be redesigned to change the sundial spacing. The busy outer tracks help disguise the issue as well. It's not that bad, but it's not something I'd be rushing out to the shop for, either.

Don't get me wrong, though; I do like a lot of of what Zenith does. They tend to be a great used buy, as well.
post #42274 of 48312

Out of interest, what does a decent OQ go for these days? I'm intrigued by it as a curiosity and an interesting addition to the portfolio.

post #42275 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by Belligero View Post


Indeed, I caught up with my watchmaker friend earlier this week, and we talked a fair bit about the OQ...

Anyway, he's quite familiar with the 5035/5055 calibres after getting specailized training on them at Rolex's advanced course in Geneva (where the 4030 movement is also covered and where he got the aforementioned info). He ended up liking the Oysterquartz a lot — so much so that he asked me to find a good 17000 for him, which I recently managed to do. It's difficult to find one that hasn't lost its bevels on the case and bracelet, but they're out there for those with patience. Now it's just a matter of getting it over to Norway.


I reckon the 38 mm EP model is a much better buy, funky overlapping subdials and all. It's distinctly Zenith, whereas the two-register doesn't seem to have much of an identity.

Always nice to hear how well regarded OQs are among watchmakers.  I think I mentioned when I was at the NYC AP boutique a few years ago their watch maker was on the floor, noticed my OQ and asked to look at it.  He seemed to like it a lot. 

 

I agree and I prefer the 38mm Zenith which is a far better fit for the movement El Primero movment and its dial is truly distinctive to the brand.  

post #42276 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dachshund View Post
 

Out of interest, what does a decent OQ go for these days? I'm intrigued by it as a curiosity and an interesting addition to the portfolio.

http://www.chrono24.se/search/index.htm?query=Rolex+Oyster+Quartz&dosearch=true&searchexplain=1&goal_suggest=1

post #42277 of 48312
^ thanks
post #42278 of 48312
Good enough excuse to post this pic:




I have always really liked that touch of red on the dial and seconds hand.


After all, a little bit of red goes a long way....
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
post #42279 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by BostonHedonist View Post

Office mates.


An inspiring shot! Here's the desk situation today:

724c163be4b02f6e5d737c44d47f454a.jpg
post #42280 of 48312
I am a big fan of your Nakayas. I am tempted but I have found that I never really use my pens. I get excited with each purchase but they eventually find their way into drawers. Yours are beautiful enough to maybe just keep them dry. But then I wouldn't enjoy watching the color wear.
post #42281 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by no frills View Post


An inspiring shot! Here's the desk situation today:
  Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
724c163be4b02f6e5d737c44d47f454a.jpg

 

 

And a hearty tip of the cap to you, sir!

post #42282 of 48312
You guys need to stop talking about oysterquartz because you're making me want to buy one and dealing with the used Rolex market is not my idea of a good time.

Speaking of Rolex, after a few months with the BLNR sitting in a drawer, I finally had an opportunity to have the watch sized at the Rolex service center in SF. They were super cool and said it was the first BLNR they had seen in person. They were surprised that there weren't more out and about because they're on multiple billboards here. Could be confirmation bias, but it does seem like Rolex has amped up billboard marketing in the bay area in the last year or so. Ditto for Omega but not to the same level.
post #42283 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by dopey View Post

I am a big fan of your Nakayas. I am tempted but I have found that I never really use my pens. I get excited with each purchase but they eventually find their way into drawers. Yours are beautiful enough to maybe just keep them dry. But then I wouldn't enjoy watching the color wear.

 

Thanks, dopey.  I'm a big proponent of use.  I use all my FPs, but I confess that many of my finer ballpoints have gone by the wayside as a result.  Ballpoints are just far more practical - they are resilient, they don't blot or clot, and you can drop cheap ballpoint pens multiple times and they'll be fine.  Not so with fountain pens.  But it also means ballpoints occupy a far more utilitarian place in my life because of this.  When I have a ballpoint with me I have no motivation to write; except when I need to sign checks or fill out forms (purely utilitarian), they don't get moved from their drawers, mugs, etc.

 

With my fountain pens, I really, really enjoy the experience of writing.  Glides impeccably on paper (and you have to pick good paper too; not all surfaces take to FPs and FP ink very well); dispenses beautiful ink consistently, and such a joy.  I keep a memoir/journal where I write down my thoughts and recount my experience growing up, with the intent of sharing what I've written with my children at some point when they are older.  I end up writing 1-2 pages every day, single spaced - maybe more, and since I started a few months ago I'm at or around 180 pages in now. 

 

But yeah, if I wasn't going to use the stuff I don't see much of a point keeping expensive desk ornaments around.

post #42284 of 48312

^^^ Also, frigging perpetual calendar is one month off.  WTF.  :brick:

post #42285 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by no frills View Post

...  I keep a memoir/journal where I write down my thoughts and recount my experience growing up, with the intent of sharing what I've written with my children at some point when they are older.  I end up writing 1-2 pages every day, single spaced - maybe more, and since I started a few months ago I'm at or around 180 pages in now. ...
This is fantastic!
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