or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › The Watch Appreciation Thread (Reviews and Photos of Men's Timepieces by Rolex, Patek Philippe, Breitling, JLC etc...)
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

The Watch Appreciation Thread (Reviews and Photos of Men's Timepieces by Rolex, Patek Philippe, Breitling, JLC etc...) - Page 2804  

post #42046 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by velomatt View Post
 

What're they going to do, just keep moving up in celestial bodies?

 

Moonwatch --> globemaster --> saturnmaster --> star master --> nebulamaster --> galaxymaster --> universemaster?  that picture looks like a nebula, btw.

 

This was news to me, guess a little Omega trivia - 'The name "Globemaster" was originally used for the Constellation timepieces that were produced and distributed in the United States during the 1950s.' 

post #42047 of 48312
Did not read all new posts, but has this been discussed yet?
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
19292_10202616286528591_3824292003183394455_n.jpg?oh=197bfc8e06242e2e6773dee7e9b7a030&oe=55B35813&__gda__=1434012882_e65bc8c114975f13b21bda9ac23a91e0



Edit - Yes, I see it has been brought up. I kinda like it.
post #42048 of 48312
Has anyone seen live pics of the 39mm OP?

Weird that there are live pics of the YM and DD 40, even the Pearlmaster but not the 39 OP.

Also, does this mean the DD II (41mm) are going to be phased out?
post #42049 of 48312
I was never much of a fan of the DJ II. They were also pretty hard to move secondhand. Even full box and papers in excellent condition.
post #42050 of 48312
Ok found a vid of the 39 OP. I think it looks pretty good and the markers are less noticeable, even the green on the blue dialed version but you still know it is there. With that said, it's probably won't make my to buy list. The 3,6,9 lumed baton markers looks a bit odd too.








YM

post #42051 of 48312
I think I said earlier that Milgauss is probably the only Rolex I'd consider, that 39 OP looks to be the second on that list. That Yachmaster looks also cool, apart from the cyclops but I know this divides opinions anyway.
post #42052 of 48312
Quote:

Originally Posted by Dino944 View Post

 

Interesting.  I've never liked the YM.  I have always seen them as the blingier, less useful version of a Submariner (given that its basically a derivative, without any additional features, and its less water resistant), and I usually dislike watches with rubber straps and rubber bezels.  Some how I find this version of the YM, more toned down with the dark/matte finished strap, bezel and dial, and oddly I find it the most appealing YM to date.  Still, I wouldn't buy a YM, as I'd rather have a Sub or SD.

 

 

When I see the new YM, I just see this (black on black will just never work for me unless I become a crime fighting billionaire):

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dino944 View Post
 

I don't think the new Rolex movements have anything to do with being a response to Omega.  If read the latest Hodinkee article on Rolex, it discusses the fact that even some of their calibres are around for a long time they constantly get upgraded and improved, even though it often is not publicized.  They give several concrete examples of changes that have been made to movements along the way. 

While I'm sure Rolex has been upgrading along the way, I'd find it hard to believe this is not them competing with/responding to the Cal 8500, etc, in some way. And that's not a bad thing at all IMO. I'd love these two companies to push each other in terms of solid daily workhorse movements. Also, if you read the latest Rolex article in Hodinkee, you also see that Rolex isn't always the first, that they have a history of waiting and designing it better, "Rolex would not be the first to make an automatic watch, but it wasn't the first to make a waterproof case, either. In the same way that Apple is seldom first to launch a product, Rolex would observe, study, improve, and execute in a way that seemingly cast aside any advancement in a space that came before it.". Granted, that is more in their history, but I would think that is just as applicable in this instance as the part about the continuous upgrade to the 4130. Really, neither of us could say for certain, but I think the safe assumption is that it's probably a bit of both.

post #42053 of 48312
Snoopy Speedy lume from @ablogtowatch. Maybe my first Omega.

6fe3cfec96400e34acd182606a487f4c.jpg
post #42054 of 48312

An aside to the regularly scheduled programming here...

post #42055 of 48312

The new bezel on the omega looks really nice.


Even in the vid of the OP, those markers still really bother me. But to each their own.

post #42056 of 48312
Do it Frills!
post #42057 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by no frills View Post

Snoopy Speedy lume from @ablogtowatch. Maybe my first Omega.

6fe3cfec96400e34acd182606a487f4c.jpg
I learned something as a result of all this:
Quote:
In 1968, NASA chose the famous beagle as an icon to act as a sort of “watchdog” over its missions. In the same year, NASA decided to use a sterling silver Snoopy pin as a sign of appreciation to NASA employees and contractors together with a commendation letter and a signed framed Snoopy certificate. Each of the sterling silver Snoopy label pins has been flown during a NASA mission....
Now comes the part where the Speedmaster played an important role. The Apollo 13 crew needed the Omega Speedmaster watch, first to time ignition of the rockets to shorten the estimated length of the return to Earth, and secondly, to time the ignition of the rockets to decrease speed and raise the flight path angle for re-entry into the Earth’s atmosphere.
This second operation was crucial, since any mistake in the timing could have led to an incorrect entry angle and, as a result, potential disaster for the crew.
As explained before, NASA used the Snoopy award for special contributions and outstanding efforts from both NASA personnel and contractors. On October 5th, 1970, NASA gave the Omega Speedmaster a Snoopy award to acknowledge the crucial role the watch played during the Apollo 13 mission.
And here is the original pin Nasa used as an award:
post #42058 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by DLJr View Post
 

 

When I see the new YM, I just see this (black on black will just never work for me unless I become a crime fighting billionaire):

 

 

 

While I'm sure Rolex has been upgrading along the way, I'd find it hard to believe this is not them competing with/responding to the Cal 8500, etc, in some way. And that's not a bad thing at all IMO. I'd love these two companies to push each other in terms of solid daily workhorse movements. Also, if you read the latest Rolex article in Hodinkee, you also see that Rolex isn't always the first, that they have a history of waiting and designing it better, "Rolex would not be the first to make an automatic watch, but it wasn't the first to make a waterproof case, either. In the same way that Apple is seldom first to launch a product, Rolex would observe, study, improve, and execute in a way that seemingly cast aside any advancement in a space that came before it.". Granted, that is more in their history, but I would think that is just as applicable in this instance as the part about the continuous upgrade to the 4130. Really, neither of us could say for certain, but I think the safe assumption is that it's probably a bit of both.

As mentioned, I wouldn't buy a YM, but its the first one that I don't completely dislike.  As stated before, I've never seen a point to owning a more blingy derivative of the Sub with less water resistance.  

 

I suppose my statement was a bit stronger than intended.  To me it seemed the OP's statement made it sound like until the cal 8500 etc was released, Rolex did nothing with its movements, which is not accurate.  Rolex has always been a company of evolutionary changes (one only needs to look at Submariners of the last 60+ years to see that), and yes they are often not the first in their field to do something.  While there is something to said for being first, there is also something to be said for companies or people that can take a good idea, and improve upon it so that its better than the original. 

 

Regarding Omega (and say Brietling), in the last 10+ years both made huge changes  by creating in house movements (15 years ago, both were still largely dependent on outsourced movements).  In a world where so many people were and are focused on whether a brand uses in house movements (I don't mind outsourced movements as long has they are very high quality), they had a lot of catching up to do.  However, I also think that when one is forced to come up with something completely new, rather than improving and evolving, sometimes a company reaches new standards sooner.  

 

In the end competition is good for most brands, and its good for us in terms of variety, improvements in design, and hopefully pricing.  Cheers!

post #42059 of 48312

Snoopy subdial. Seems like a collector's item in the making.

post #42060 of 48312

Re Snoopy Speedy - I love the lumed bezel. I appreciate the Snoopy history (thanks, dopey). But I don't warm to the idea of a cartoon character on my watch.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
This thread is locked  
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › The Watch Appreciation Thread (Reviews and Photos of Men's Timepieces by Rolex, Patek Philippe, Breitling, JLC etc...)