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The Watch Appreciation Thread (Reviews and Photos of Men's Timepieces by Rolex, Patek Philippe, Breitling, JLC etc...) - Page 2733  

post #40981 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by Keith T View Post

Yaaaaassssss......Jules Verne FTW!

Definitely one of my favorites! In fact I like it so much I sometimes hesitate to wear it. I've had it for a year and the patina seems to be developing very quickly - I'd like to preserve its golden-brown color for as long as possible. It's stupid, I know, as the strap is meant to be worn and I can always source another 24/22 JV when necessary, but I still can't help being a little bitch about it given their expense.

Quote:
Originally Posted by scottcw View Post

I used to discount the Datejust in comparison to an Explorer or GMT, but the simple dial is growing on me. Any thoughts from owners past and present?

I have an X serial 16220 that I love. Well ...used to love. It's an early 90s Datejust and it used to have a white dial with white roman numerals before my wife appropriated it. I used to really enjoy wearing it on hot days when larger/heavier pieces would prove uncomfortable and always found it to be a perfect city/sport watch. I really appreciated the 36mm size when I did not feel like strapping a larger hunk of metal to my wrist.

These days it has a smooth bezel and a custom pink MOP/diamond dial, and I cannot bear to look at it.
post #40982 of 48312
OK yeah I guess this is terminology fail on my part.
post #40983 of 48312

Here is a Datejust with an Engine Turned bezel and Tapestry Dial. An awesome combo and not something you see every day.

 

post #40984 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by Belligero View Post

I personally don't think it's a good idea. I'd rather go all-mechanical or normal quartz. Seiko offers some amazingly good conventional quartz movements.

The complex hybrid approach seems to combine the worst of both worlds: the maintenance requirements and constant tension/wear of mechanical, and the unserviceable failure mode of micro-electronics. Also, unless it's on your wrist every day, quartz accuracy is essentially meaningless when the watch stops after a few days off the wrist and needs resetting. I suppose one could keep it on a winder, but I'd say that's a case of the cure being worse than the disease.

Seiko devotees like to point out that the movement took 25 years to develop. I'd wager that what actually happened is that they came up with a concept , quickly realized it had absolutely no advantages (and significant disadvantages) compared to existing designs, shelved it for about twenty years, and then thought it might be viable as a pointless luxury — which expensive wristwatches essentially are.

teacha.gif

I'm sorry, but for you to (rightfully) defend the Oysterquartz and then turn around and poop on the Spring Drive is a bit much.

I own 3 Spring Drive watches. Of all the watches I have, these are the three watches that I wear all the time. Never had a problem with any of them. And with 15 years worth of time in the discerning Japanese consumer market with no problems,it's a proven design.

All the Spring Drive movement is is a mechanical movement with a Quartz controlled electromagnetic brake in place of a mechanical escapement. Apart from the visual payoff of a stopless sweep hand, The movement itself has no real friction. That means potentially a much longer service interval. There are some other advantages, such as the 72 hour power reserve.

Electromechanical escapements are not without precedent. Through the 19th and 20th centuries, many major cities had Hipp clocks as their master clocks.

My Spring Drive GMT is technically superior to the BLNR on multiple levels. It immediately shows the time in three, rather than just two time zones. The bezel has 72 clicks as opposed to the Rolex' 24. That means greater flexibility in setting the third time zone. It also allows the bezel to be used for casual interval timing, though not to the same level of precision as a dive bezel. It gains less than a second per day. It has a 72 hour power reserve. It probably has about the same level of bling as the BLNR, but is better distributed throughout the design, and is in my opinion more tasteful. The fit and finish of the watch rivals anything put out by Switzerland apart from the top three.

The design cues of Grand Seiko watches are typically Japanese. It's an acquired taste for some. Any other reservations go to branding.

Ultimately, it's a matter of taste, and the willingness to try something new. I for one am glad I did.


post #40985 of 48312
Good lookin Seiko!
post #40986 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hayward View Post

I'm sorry, but for you to (rightfully) defend the Oysterquartz and then turn around and poop on the Spring Drive is a bit much. Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
I own 3 Spring Drive watches. Of all the watches I have, these are the three watches that I wear all the time. Never had a problem with any of them. And with 15 years worth of time in the discerning Japanese consumer market with no problems,it's a proven design.

All the Spring Drive movement is is a mechanical movement with a Quartz controlled electromagnetic brake in place of a mechanical escapement. Apart from the visual payoff of a stopless sweep hand, The movement itself has no real friction. That means potentially a much longer service interval. There are some other advantages, such as the 72 hour power reserve.

Electromechanical escapements are not without precedent. Through the 19th and 20th centuries, many major cities had Hipp clocks as their master clocks.

My Spring Drive GMT is technically superior to the BLNR on multiple levels. It immediately shows the time in three, rather than just two time zones. The bezel has 72 clicks as opposed to the Rolex' 24. That means greater flexibility in setting the third time zone. It also allows the bezel to be used for casual interval timing, though not to the same level of precision as a dive bezel. It gains less than a second per day. It has a 72 hour power reserve. It probably has about the same level of bling as the BLNR, but is better distributed throughout the design, and is in my opinion more tasteful. The fit and finish of the watch rivals anything put out by Switzerland apart from the top three.

The design cues of Grand Seiko watches are typically Japanese. It's an acquired taste for some. Any other reservations go to branding.

Ultimately, it's a matter of taste, and the willingness to try something new. I for one am glad I did.



To each his own, it's just that I prefer not to have a quartz watch whose mechanical components require overhauling in Japan every five years. They're quality watches without a doubt, and you know that I have respect for Seiko as a watchmaker — they're as hardcore as they come as far as manufaturing integrity goes — but I'd still rather get something from the hi-beat mechanical or 9F quartz range if I was going Grand Seiko. If I was buying a watch based on specifications, I'd just go straight for the top G-Shock model and be done with it.

I still enjoy when I get the opportunity to check out a Spring Drive model, but the ownership proposition doesn't appeal to me. Anyway, that's just my opinion; I could be wrong.
post #40987 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by Belligero View Post

Anyway, that's just my opinion; I could be wrong.

 

And as we know and as your username indicates, you are a man of strong opinions! ;)

post #40988 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cleav View Post

@scottcw , love my blue, Duchess likes hers too

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)




There's that beauty again inlove.gif I gotta get me one like that some day.
post #40989 of 48312
You people are bad for me.
post #40990 of 48312
Been out the country for a few days so just catching up. Awesome two-tone GMT a while back - so 80s in such a good way. Also a great Journe a few posts back, and my current favourite JLC demi-grail duometre - that dial is sort of sandy and textured and works so well in the flesh.

Good to see a morsel of 42mm Ex2 love too - I've just got back from what I would describe as a 'casual' business trip in S Africa and that watch just works so well in that context in my opinion.
post #40991 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheWraith View Post

The only "gold" watch I would ever wear (not my photo):


Ha! Just saw this from a short while back. +1. Here's mine - old snap but this is my favourite at the moment...

post #40992 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dachshund View Post

Good to see a morsel of 42mm Ex2 love too - I've just got back from what I would describe as a 'casual' business trip in S Africa and that watch just works so well in that context in my opinion.

One thing I give Rolex big credit for in the 3136/3156/3187 movements is that they manufacture a larger base plate and date wheel to properly fit the enlarged dimensions of their respective Datejust II, Day-Date II and Explorer II models. Although I prefer the originial size in every case (no pun intended), I appreciate that the embiggened versions didn't just get the same movement marooned inside with a telltale no-man's-land between the date window and the rehaut.

I meant to reply to this post earlier, but it's highly salient:
Quote:
Originally Posted by dopey View Post

Small movements in big cases bother me because it seems like a break-down in integrated design. ... (Click to show)
Rather, the manufacturer looks like it is treating its products like a parts assembly - case from bin A, movement from bin B dial from bin C, etc. It also bothers me that the case doesn't represent what is inside - it is like getting a giant gift box with a tiny present. The case exists to house the movement, not to house air, spacers and a movement.
If manufacturers are going to insist on big cases and little movements, they should at least make a little door in the back so you can access the extra room in the case and keep extra paperclips or diamonds, or even spare change.

Well-put about integrated design. Indeed, some kind of water-/air-tight access port in order to stash one's weed would justify the existence of so much wasted space that's currently occupied by the aforementioned spacers and air. "Modders" take note; that's one heck of an opportunity.

smile.gif

Otherwise, I'm just picturing tumbleweed:

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post #40993 of 48312
I'd never appreciated that size subtlety but you're right - looking at it now it looks well-balanced. It would look horrible if they'd just dumped a smaller movement into it.
post #40994 of 48312
Touching on what Frilly posted a few days ago - Patek decreasing by 7%, Panerai by 5%, Sinn and Dornbleuth as well. WOW. All due respect to what's going on around the world, but it might actually be a buyer's market again soon. So to speak..
post #40995 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by rnguy001 View Post

Touching on what Frilly posted a few days ago - Patek decreasing by 7%, Panerai by 5%, Sinn and Dornbleuth as well. WOW. All due respect to what's going on around the world, but it might actually be a buyer's market again soon. So to speak..

That's their dealer cost in Swiss Francs. The cost you see outside of Switzerland is still going to be higher unless your local currency has also had a massive increase too. It's certainly a buyer's market for those whose cash assets are in CHF, but then again, everything is currently a buyer's market for 'em.
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Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › The Watch Appreciation Thread (Reviews and Photos of Men's Timepieces by Rolex, Patek Philippe, Breitling, JLC etc...)