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The Watch Appreciation Thread (Reviews and Photos of Men's Timepieces by Rolex, Patek Philippe, Breitling, JLC etc...) - Page 2271  

post #34051 of 48312
I actually agree - the Timefactor's grey does look a bit too silvery, which has held me back from getting it so far. And back when I first was looking for the Phoenix straps, for some reason I only found US sources so this is perfect, thanks for the link!
post #34052 of 48312
You can also buy them from GGB.

And perhaps you can darken (and condition) your Camille Fournet strap with some Sno Seal?
Edited by Wes Bourne - 7/27/14 at 8:27pm
post #34053 of 48312
Omega Speedmaster acquisition update. I had some issues initially, and they may have been user error. Having never owned a manual wind watch I am not sure I appreciated the tension in the watch. When I wound it the first time I wound it maybe 7-10 times and was having issues with the watch stopping.

Over the weekend I realized that I was mistaking tension for the watch being wound. A full wind seems to be in the 20-30 rotations and since discovering this I have had no issues. I feel like an idiot, but I am so happy that the watch is running well.

I also went out this weekend and purchased a new brown alligator strap to give me a bit more flexibility with my suits of choice.

A question: Can someone recommend a tool to remove and replace straps on my own?
post #34054 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by CTLION View Post

Omega Speedmaster acquisition update. I had some issues initially, and they may have been user error. Having never owned a manual wind watch I am not sure I appreciated the tension in the watch. When I wound it the first time I wound it maybe 7-10 times and was having issues with the watch stopping.

Over the weekend I realized that I was mistaking tension for the watch being wound. A full wind seems to be in the 20-30 rotations and since discovering this I have had no issues. I feel like an idiot, but I am so happy that the watch is running well.

I also went out this weekend and purchased a new brown alligator strap to give me a bit more flexibility with my suits of choice.

A question: Can someone recommend a tool to remove and replace straps on my own?
The Speedy is more like 30-40 turns to full wind. Just wind it till the crown stops turning. That is your best bet.

You can't go wrong with the FB-504.
http://www.ofrei.com/page_226.html
post #34055 of 48312
Omega Speedmaster Professional question. I assume the answer is yes, but. I should ask this stupid question.

Is it ok to wind the watch before the reserve runs out? For instance will I do any damage winding the watch every 15 hours to insure that it never dies on me?

I apologize for my green nature.
post #34056 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by CTLION View Post

Omega Speedmaster Professional question. I assume the answer is yes, but. I should ask this stupid question.

Is it ok to wind the watch before the reserve runs out? For instance will I do any damage winding the watch every 15 hours to insure that it never dies on me?

I apologize for my green nature.
I wind mine fully (till the crown stops) every morning. No harm will be done.
post #34057 of 48312
what he said. as long as you dont wind it past the stopping point, you should be fine in whatever winding regiment you choose.
post #34058 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wes Bourne View Post

And perhaps you can darken (and condition) your Camille Fournet strap with some Sno Seal?
I had actually considered dark brown shoe cream - not sure if it'll rub off though.

Quote:
Originally Posted by CTLION View Post

A question: Can someone recommend a tool to remove and replace straps on my own?
Will depend on your specific needs (I don't know what's required for a Speedy), but I'm using a Bergeon 6767.
post #34059 of 48312
I know very little about watches, so please be gentle ...

I was looking at the Rolex Daytona and Submariner recently at a local shop, and am leaning towards getting a vintage Daytona. Was wondering:

1. Am I correct in thinking that most vintage Daytonas will be around $25k?
2. Is paying $25k for these kinds of movements a bad idea? Don't know much about watches, but the Daytona seems a bit expensive for the complications. I assume a lot of this is because of the hype and limited releases, but would be curious to hear from more knowledgable members about whether this would be a bad purchase.

TIA.
post #34060 of 48312
Hey DWW,

You are correct in that assumption, although it really, really varies based upon what "kind" of vintage Daytona you are looking at. An El Primero Daytona a la Dino's? Or are we talking Paul Newman here?

Here is some excellent reading:

http://www.hodinkee.com/features/reference-points-the-paul-newman-daytona

I am not all too familiar with your watches. But if I could give any advice to a novice, if I had $25,000 to spend, and I was new to watches, I probably would not jump straight into the vintage Daytona game. That is Lange, Patek, VC, AP money. The vintage watch game is a minefield. In fact, it is one that I am not overly comfortable in traversing, and I have been at this hobby for a few years now.

As for whether it is a good or bad idea, well, I guess it depends who you ask. I think that the stratospheric prices that people are paying for vintage Rolex is a bit astounding. Personally, I think that the market is very, very inflated. ESPECIALLY for vintage Daytonas. But then, they do not make my heart sing. The whole vintage watch thing is kind of in vogue right now, and I really do wonder whether prices will drop when people become less interested. But who knows?

I also wonder to what extent the desire for these watches emanates from group think or individual taste. Vintage Rolex has never been as desirable as it is now. Well, at least not to this extent.

Sorry for answering with a question mark, but I just think that it is a tricky, tricky area to navigate. Tread carefully!
post #34061 of 48312
Will it be your onewatch? I dunno, I would spend $25k differently (my "nice" watch owning experience is pretty limited).

I'm down to my Datejust now... I'd probably add an AP and a JLC MUT moon phase or something with $25k.
post #34062 of 48312
I also think it's a rare man who buys his first expensive watch and actually sticks with a 'onewatch' philosophy. 99% of the time, that first watch is just the starting point.

Re: box discussion, the Lange box is not all that impressive confused.gif
post #34063 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieworkwear View Post

I know very little about watches, so please be gentle ...

I was looking at the Rolex Daytona and Submariner recently at a local shop, and am leaning towards getting a vintage Daytona. Was wondering:

1. Am I correct in thinking that most vintage Daytonas will be around $25k?
2. Is paying $25k for these kinds of movements a bad idea? Don't know much about watches, but the Daytona seems a bit expensive for the complications. I assume a lot of this is because of the hype and limited releases, but would be curious to hear from more knowledgable members about whether this would be a bad purchase.

TIA.

First there are several versions of Daytonas as they have been made since the early 1960s.  I am guessing that if you are looking at $25,000 and its steel, then it is either a 6263/6265 manual wind Daytona, which are manual wind watches.  Or perhaps its a 16520 automatic with Patrizzi dial,

 

If you want to spend less, you could buy a current automatic 116520 (new or used and they will be between maybe $9,000-13,000).  These are automatics, they have a 72 hour power reserve, and are very robust.  They make great watches for everyday wear.  

 

It really depends on what you want.  The 6263/6265 and 16520 are very collectible, and have gone up in value in recent years.  Whether they continue to do so, only time will tell.  

 

These were not limited release watches.  In fact the 6263/6265 weren't very popular when new.  Most AD's heavily discounted them just to get rid of them.  However, they became more popular in the late 1980s after going out of production, and their values have increased.  The 16520 was always quite popular and was Rolex's first automatic chronograph.  At one point their were waiting lists of 5 years to get them and they regularly sold for more than the MSRP (sometimes by 50% more, sometimes 100% more).  These are holding their values quite nicely.  There are also some variations of them, with the Patrizzi dials (white subdial rings turn tan/brown), or the early porcelain dial models (produced for a year or two) where the word "Cosmograph" is separated from the other wording, and is set lower than on subsequent years).  Both groups of these watches were not made in the numbers that Daytonas are produced in today, as Rolex was dependent on outside sources for base movement for the old manual wind models and for the 16520 Daytona. 

 

I guess its a matter of whether you would chose to have a watch that is more of a collectible watch (that probably wouldn't be ideal for beating the heck out of, because you reduce its value by degrading its condition), or whether a modern 116520 Daytona which you could beat the hell out of and wouldn't have paid that much money for (relatively speaking), better suits your needs.

 

I don't think Daytonas are a bad purchase at all, its a matter of deciding which version best suits your needs or your collection.

post #34064 of 48312
I thought I could do the one watch thing, when my wife bought me a Rolex for my 40th. 8 months later I added a Omega Speedmaster Professional and now it's hard for me to imagine wearing my Rolex.

I am kind of like a 2 year old with a shiny new toy...I love it... I love it...I love it...hey what's that over there? I want that...I want that...I love it...I love it.
post #34065 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by Newcomer View Post

Hey DWW,

Or are we talking Paul Newman here?

As for whether it is a good or bad idea, well, I guess it depends who you ask. I think that the stratospheric prices that people are paying for vintage Rolex is a bit astounding. Personally, I think that the market is very, very inflated. ESPECIALLY for vintage Daytonas.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         Vintage Rolex has never been as desirable as it is now. Well, at least not to this extent.

 

Hi Nuke,  Clearly vintage Daytonas aren't your thing, and that's cool.  No watch can be everything to everyone.  

 

I did want to point out though, that $25,000 isn't even remotely in the realm of Paul Newman Daytonas.  You can't touch one in steel for less than low 6 figures, and some of the rarer models are high mid to high 6 figure range.  

 

Pricing on a lot of vintage watches has definitely been crazy, but $25,000 has been about an average price on "NON-Newman dial" 6265/6263 for several years, so there really hasn't been any jump due to collector speculation there, and actually I've seen some in the low 30s on occasion.   In  addition vintage Rolex watches have been extremely desirable for more than 20 years, so I'm not sure I'd say they have never been as desirable...unless you are simply correlating the increase in prices with desirability, and to that I'd say top collectors often have a different mind set.  Ralph Lauren collects watches and cars...and at times has been said to over pay, only years later to have people say he was ahead of the curve, as the item he bought are often worth many times more than he paid for them years ago.  IIRC, its been said that for the right example, "He is willing to paying tomorrow's prices to be assured he has the car [watch] that he wants, today."  Top collectors don't want the daily drivers/watches, they want the best examples, complete with B&P etc.      

 

In the end, to the OP, if you are completely new to the watch hobby, and not just new to Daytonas you really need to do a lot of home work before buying. 

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