or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › The Watch Appreciation Thread (Reviews and Photos of Men's Timepieces by Rolex, Patek Philippe, Breitling, JLC etc...)
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

The Watch Appreciation Thread (Reviews and Photos of Men's Timepieces by Rolex, Patek Philippe, Breitling, JLC etc...) - Page 2267  

post #33991 of 48312
i always keep the watch box and all other goodies. for a few reasons.

1. i am a brand whore.

2. part of what goes into the price we pay is the branding, packaging and extras, so i want to keep that. its part of the purchase.

3. i keep the watch in there when i am not wearing it.

4. should i sell the watch, having the box, papers and goodies not only increase the value, they make it much easier to sell the watch. there is just a bigger market for watches with all the original packaging.
post #33992 of 48312
^^ I agree with all that. I keep everything too, I just don't care what it looks like or what it is constructed of.
post #33993 of 48312
Stitch-meister - I too keep all my old boxes and agree it definitely helps with reselling having all the original books, papers, boxes etc. I guess my point is if I wanted to buy a watch, in this case the Speedmaster, and I could have the exact same watch with OEM boxes, I'd rather buy the Speedy that came with the cheaper box and without the additional accessories, more expensive packaging.
post #33994 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnsNotHere View Post
 I am however saving for a speedy professional moon watch and came across this article. Thoughts on the "upgrade"...

Omega makes minor changes to the Moonwatch

http://acwatchblog.com/2014/07/23/omega-makes-minor-changes-to-the-moonwatch/

I like the idea of the bracelet upgrade (although, still like the looks of the older bracelet more).  I'm not into the NATO strap thing so that would be irrelevant to me.  Its not a make or break upgrade (and in the event you are just starting your research the movement is a bit different than what was in the original Moonwatch, which was cal 321).  

 

For some it will merely be a question of whether the price increase is worth it to them for the upgraded bracelet, box, strap, etc, or if they would rather look for the previous model.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by tifosi View Post

I don't care what manufacturer it is...if them packaging my watch in a ziplock bag would save me a grand I wouldn't mind. Who cares about a friggin box?

Sorry Tif, people like my Dad are huge into the what the design or looks are of watch boxes (and it probably forces companies to spend more and charge more for packaging).  Perhaps its more of an issue at a certain price point, and feeling that the box should be fitting for a high end watch.  If one is spending Lange or Patek money on a watch it may seem a bit odd or anti climactic if they give you a box made of particle board, and tell you look up the owners manual info on line. 

 

I think on a more modestly priced watch, maybe I'd opt to save the money and not have a very fancy watch box. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by bkotsko View Post
 

I tend to disagree, with a caveat.

If one is holding on to a higher end watch for many years, and would like it to keep provenance, then a box is a crucial part of that.

If you are getting a Hamilton or something with less intrinsic value, I agree with you Tif.

:fistbump:  Agreed. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Betelgeuse View Post

I've seen that many of you say that watches should not be bought as an investment and I agree because in the short term they will not hold their value and personally I will not sell a watch to get more money but what about in the long term? Let's say 30-40 years?

As for investment, its really a tough proposition in that there are several variables.  The watch itself, the brand, the model, and trends 30-40 years from now.  A 1970 GMT Master was about $250 brand new.  Depending on condition, box & papers, etc, that watch could easily sell for $6,000 +/- (just using as a ball park figure).  An Omega Seamaster of the same vintage might have sold for about the same, but most will be worth less.  Or a vintage 33mm time only AP, VC, or PP would have sold for a heck of a lot more than the GMT, but because of its size might be a tough sell today and be worth less to collectors than that GMT.  By the same token, if you bought a Rolex Explorer II 1655, it was about the same price as a GMT when new, dealers couldn't give them away, and they were relatively worthless until about 10 years ago.  Now they regularly go for $15,000-20,0000.  All of the original buyers may have been thrilled when they got their watches, and the value to them in 30-40 years might be icing on the cake, but none could have predicted where things would go in terms of value or the public's interest (in the 1980s ultra slim was the in thing, now we see gigantic watches from almost all makers).  

 

If you buy a good watch and hang onto it for a long time hopefully, it will retain its value.  However, when you say investment...you have to ask is making a few hundred dollars possibly an investment over 30-40 years?  Or does it need to double your money and make a significant increase for it to be worth while as an investment.  Could your money make more money in other investments?  Also, today most watch companies produce a greater volume of watches than they did even 10 years ago, so current watches aren't generally as rare as pieces from the past.  You also have to consider the cost of servicing them occasionally, and if you have a good size collection the cost of insurance.  

 

In the end, buy a watch you really like.  If it goes up in value, that's a bonus, but if it doesn't then you wont' be disappointed. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by in stitches View Post

i always keep the watch box and all other goodies. for a few reasons.

1. i am a brand whore.

2. part of what goes into the price we pay is the branding, packaging and extras, so i want to keep that. its part of the purchase.

3. i keep the watch in there when i am not wearing it.

4. should i sell the watch, having the box, papers and goodies not only increase the value, they make it much easier to sell the watch. there is just a bigger market for watches with all the original packaging.

Spot on mah man!!!! :fistbump: 


Edited by Dino944 - 7/25/14 at 10:48am
post #33995 of 48312
cheers.gif
post #33996 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dino944 View Post
 

 

As for investment, its really a tough proposition in that there are several variables.  The watch itself, the brand, the model, and trends 30-40 years from now.  A 1970 GMT Master was about $250 brand new.  Depending on condition, box & papers, etc, that watch could easily sell for $6,000 +/- (just using as a ball park figure).  An Omega Seamaster of the same vintage might have sold for about the same, but most will be worth less.  Or a vintage 33mm time only AP, VC, or PP would have sold for a heck of a lot more than the GMT, but because of its size might be a tough sell today and be worth less to collectors than that GMT.  By the same token, if you bought a Rolex Explorer II 1655, it was about the same price as a GMT when new, dealers couldn't give them away, and they were relatively worthless until about 10 years ago.  Now they regularly go for $15,000-20,0000.  All of the original buyers may have been thrilled when they got their watches, and the value to them in 30-40 years might be icing on the cake, but none could have predicted where things would go in terms of value or the public's interest (in the 1980s ultra slim was the in thing, now we see gigantic watches from almost all makers).  

 

If you buy a good watch and hang onto it for a long time hopefully, it will retain its value.  However, when you say investment...you have to ask is making a few hundred dollars possibly an investment over 30-40 years?  Or does it need to double your money and make a significant increase for it to be worth while as an investment.  Could your money make more money in other investments?  Also, today most watch companies produce a great volume of watches than they did even 10 years ago, so current watches aren't generally as rare was pieces from the past.  You also have to consider the cost of servicing them occasionally, and if you have a good size collection the cost of insurance.  

 

In the end, buy a watch you really like.  If it goes up in value, that's a bonus, but if it doesn't then you wont' be disappointed. 

 

Thanks Dino for your answer! Then investment is definitely not the word to use. I asked cause I was wondering if it really it's worth buying for example two Longines' and two Hamilton's for the moment and then start adding the Omega's and the IWC's and a Panerai - although I have a chance to get a used Panerai for $1,526 usd in an auction - or skip the other 4 watches and go directly with the Omega Speedmaster.

 

Pros and cons, I think the Speedmaster should be the first option because of that 'new' version and the price increase. :mad: 

 

I like all of them. 

post #33997 of 48312

I would skip if the Longines and Hamiltons will lose significant wrist time as you add other watches you want more. If they will always see wrist time, then get em.

post #33998 of 48312
That Bremont story and subsequent comment thread is a little cringeworthy.
post #33999 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by Betelgeuse View Post
 

 

Thanks Dino for your answer! Then investment is definitely not the word to use. I asked cause I was wondering if it really it's worth buying for example two Longines' and two Hamilton's for the moment and then start adding the Omega's and the IWC's and a Panerai - although I have a chance to get a used Panerai for $1,526 usd in an auction - or skip the other 4 watches and go directly with the Omega Speedmaster.

 

Pros and cons, I think the Speedmaster should be the first option because of that 'new' version and the price increase. :mad: 

 

I like all of them. 

You are welcome.  Its important to follow your heart and buy what makes you smile.  However, if your idea to buy the Longines and Hamiltons are because you thought there is greater investment potential in acquiring a volume of watches, then that would be IMHO a mistake.  Buy them only if you really like them, and they are not merely flavor of the day substitutes for what you really want.  They are quality watches, but I just don't see them being watches that will retain or gain in value.  

 

There were times I had only 1 nice watch, but I was always happy to enjoy that watch and admirer other pieces from afar.  Eventually, I had 2.  Then over the course of several years I was lucky enough to add other pieces that I liked.  I am of the mentality that I would rather have 1 or maybe 2 really good watches that I truly want, rather than have 4 or 6 watches, with several just being the flavor of the day but affordable.  I'd suggest if that if your heart is with a Speedy or an IWC or Panerai, that you save up until you can acquire one of these watches that you truly want. Getting the Hamiltons or Longines will just deplete your watch fund and further delay your acquiring a Speedy, IWC, or Panerai.  Just my 2 cents.

 

Wishing you luck with whatever you decide. 

post #34000 of 48312
@Betelgeuse, skip the 4 and go directly to the Speedy. I think you'll enjoy the Omega more that way. I don't the price range on the 4 you are looking at, but I would assume by the time you get the others, you really are not THAT far off from the Omega.
post #34001 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by DLJr View Post
 

I would skip if the Longines and Hamiltons will lose significant wrist time as you add other watches you want more. If they will always see wrist time, then get em.

 

This. that's what made me reconsider buying them. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dino944 View Post
 

You are welcome.  Its important to follow your heart and buy what makes you smile.  However, if your idea to buy the Longines and Hamiltons are because you thought there is greater investment potential in acquiring a volume of watches, then that would be IMHO a mistake.  Buy them only if you really like them, and they are not merely flavor of the day substitutes for what you really want.  They are quality watches, but I just don't see them being watches that will retain or gain in value.  

 

There were times I had only 1 nice watch, but I was always happy to enjoy that watch and admirer other pieces from afar.  Eventually, I had 2.  Then over the course of several years I was lucky enough to add other pieces that I liked.  I am of the mentality that I would rather have 1 or maybe 2 really good watches that I truly want, rather than have 4 or 6 watches, with several just being the flavor of the day but affordable.  I'd suggest if that if your heart is with a Speedy or an IWC or Panerai, that you save up until you can acquire one of these watches that you truly want. Getting the Hamiltons or Longines will just deplete your watch fund and further delay your acquiring a Speedy, IWC, or Panerai.  Just my 2 cents.

 

Wishing you luck with whatever you decide. 

 

Thanks Dino! Certainly I will try to give them some wrist time but at the end I might only be wearing the other (Speedy, IWC, etc) watches. 

post #34002 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by bdeuce22 View Post

That Bremont story and subsequent comment thread is a little cringeworthy.

I am trying very, very hard to figure out what in the hell is going on.
post #34003 of 48312
I don't know what the real story is, but I find it hard to believe that Bremont, in this day and age, really think they could trick people by claiming an in-house movement if it's just outsourced. On social media, everyone is a detective - this could be disastrous for them.
post #34004 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by Newcomer View Post


I am trying very, very hard to figure out what in the hell is going on.

Honestly, I think there is more lather about this than necessary.

 

Bremont is an aviation oriented watch company.

They tried a gimmick with the muslin from one of the Wright brothers wings. [albeit a 90 cm2 (13 in2) piece total].

This is applicable to the orientation of their company. Whether it is cool or not is subjective.

 

They have a movement they supposedly co-developed with another company, of which some of the parts are made in the UK.

They claimed it was an in house movement, but neglected to mention it was co-developed.

Some of the proprietary blueprints were possibly released, when they shouldn't be.

 

I don't get the hype.

So many of the people on the thread seem to be trying to catch someone in a lie.

post #34005 of 48312

I wonder if the increase in MSRP for the new Speedy will partially increase prices for used ones, as there is now a greater price discrepancy. Im pretty sure the Speedy Pro or a Pelagos will be my next watch, Im just debating between the two. Either would be used. I think if I bought a used Speedy and liked it that much, I would eventually flip it for a new one to call my own and keep.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
This thread is locked  
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › The Watch Appreciation Thread (Reviews and Photos of Men's Timepieces by Rolex, Patek Philippe, Breitling, JLC etc...)