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The Watch Appreciation Thread (Reviews and Photos of Men's Timepieces by Rolex, Patek Philippe, Breitling, JLC etc...) - Page 2229  

post #33421 of 48312
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dino944 View Post

 

Definitely, your best post to date!  It's always great getting some insight into another's collectors preferences and collection.  The Rado is a particularly interesting watch.  I haven't seen any in a while, as our local AD (for RADO and several other brands closed their shop about 7 years ago).   However, they have always been innovative with the use of different materials Tungsten Carbide, Ceramic and other materials to make largely scratch proof watches.  The case reminds me a bit of the Omega Flightmasters from the 1970s, and I think the faceted crystal is very cool.  You are correct, stone dials were used on some and are very difficult to work with and are quite costly.  Piaget is famous for working with stone dials (onyx, lapis, tigers eye, etc).  From what I heard recently, most of the largest tigers eye mine has been completely mined so it is something that might either be only available on a very limited scale, or perhaps in the future only if one chooses a vintage watch.  Watches of the late 1960s and 1970s used some very funky cases and, while they sometimes do date a watch to a particular decade, I think its really cool to have case shapes that are something other than round.  In fact, so far I have yet to buy a round cased dress watch, they are all other shapes (square,rectangular, and asymmetric).  Thanks for sharing your collection with us.  Cheers!  

 
Quote:
Originally Posted by no frills View Post

DerangedGoose - fantastic post. Thanks for elaborating on your preferences and the stuff in your collection. Aside from the details Dino pointed out above, I love what you did with the rocket hands. That lume shot is awesome hahah.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Newcomer View Post

I am with Frills there, DG, thanks for that lengthy and informative post. It is stuff like that that keeps this thread moving!

 

Thanks guys! It was the rocket ship hands that made me curious about figuring out how to calculate what time the hands on a watch would line up (its a fun little math teaser). I tend to go for a little bit more obscure stuff, its nice to be able to take the time and explain why. Honestly, I think the 60s and 70s were some of the best times for watch design. Manufacturers were not afraid to push the boundaries, and while some of the designs may have failed, even the more unique ones retain a certain timeless elegance of proportion that reminds me of Art Deco, in a way. I love the idea of a novel shape executed in a sparse, purposeful way. Very clean

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by mimo View Post
 

DG, I love that Longines - a 38mm steel dress watch with small second and gold markers is something that should be seen more often.  Gold is too much bling (and money), and most steel dress watches I see seem to either be very big and flat, or no small seconds, or spoiled by unbalancing elements like an Arabic 12 or a date window.  That is bang on.  

 

Also, I'm intrigued by your Russian items too - every one a winner in my eyes.  How did that particular interest come about?

 

 

Thanks for the kind words! It took me FOREVER to find it, scouring hundreds and hundreds of auctions, emailing sellers repeatedly to ask what size the case was (this is a NO BRAINER! Why dont people post this in their auction? Do they think they are going to fool someone when a 34mm watch shows up and disappoints them?) and sometimes pass up otherwise attractive watches when I couldnt get a straight idea on their size.
 
South America (where my Longines came from) has an interesting history with Swiss manufacturers. Oftentimes, movements and dials were repurposed into domestically produced cases as a way to avoid having to pay swiss markup and domestic import charges on gold watches/jewelry. Or, retailers would order chromed brass models and then either right away put them into stainless cases, or eventually recase them when the plating wore off. It may be that my Longines is not in its original case, my expertise is not nearly broad enough but most WUS forum amateurs agreed that if it is recased, it is one that is in very close proportion to what would have been original.
 
Here is another interesting vintage find. "Aguila Suizo" (Swiss Eagle) was a South American label of the Record Watch Company, likely incorporated under some kind of law that requires foreign companies to work with domestic firms. It too is large for its age, almost 37mm without the crown and a 20mm lug width. The hands and dial have a wonderful even patina, and the 022-18 movement is well regarded as a solid performer. Interestingly enough, it came in two versions (both with Breguet balances), one shock protected and one unprotected. This one is an unprotected model. The case is still good condition, albeit with some brassing through the gold plate. I am debating whether to keep it or replate it (or perhaps have it stripped), as I really dont have much use for a gold dress watch, and it would be nice to have one I can wear on a black band (having a tough time finding another large vintage dress watch). Of course, if its brass under there than stripping the plating wont do anything for my purposes. It is a fantastic size and condition, however:
 

 

The earlist service date engraved is 1968, so this is likely an early 60s model, judging by the dial design:

 

 

As for the Russian watches, my entire family is Russian/Eastern European and emigrated out of the Soviet Union into Israel the second they were allowed, during the first wave of "Aaliyah" in the early 1970s. I grew up with Russian and Hebrew as my first languages, since having forgotten Hebrew completely (one day Ill get it back). I grew up exposed to Russian language, culture, and music, and while I would hesitate to call myself culturally "Russian", I have grown to have a healthy respect for the people, whom I find especially interesting considering their brutal history and melancholy nature. They are truly an intelligent lot, very clever and resourceful. While consumer goods in the USSR were in short supply, those that were available for consumption were simple, perhaps even spartan, but of extremely robust build. To this day in Russia cars and appliances from the 40s through the 60s work fine and well with minimal intervention.

 

As an example of their effective engineering, consider the Vostok Amphibia, a classic 200m diver that has attained cult status with its various cases and dials. When engineers set out to create a watch for navy/military use, they needed something strong and simple to produce. The Swiss approach of grease and gaskets everywhere, a thick crystal and a case torqued down would not facilitate ease of maintenance and cost of manufacture. The design had three notable features:

 

1) Instead of a thick domed glass, they used a thinner domed acrylic of a special polymer whose strength and mechanical characteristics were carefully chosen. The crystal is machined precisely and sits in the case with very certain tolerances. As the water pressure bears down on the face, the crystal flattens to predetermined dimensions and actually becomes more water resistant with depth!

 

2) Instead of a one piece screw caseback with a thin gasket that has to be replaced every time it is opened and closed, the Amphibia uses a two piece system. The case contains a wide gasket made of sintered rubber upon which a flat caseback plate sits. Around this caseback plate is screwed a bayonet ring. Therefore, as water pressure increases against the caseback, it is again shoved deeper into the wide rubber gasket, again increasing the water resistance with depth!

 

3) the Amphibia crown and stem assembly incorporates a clutch between the two pieces, hidden inside the crown: they are coupled only when the crown is pulled slightly away from the stem, otherwise they are decoupled and the crown wobbles somewhat in relation to the stem. During winding - and time setting - the crown needs to be manually pulled away slightly as it does not incorporate an internal spring, eliminating the pressures imparted on the keyless works with standard mechanisms, and the inherent "wobble" prevents the stem from getting bent. When the crown is screwed in, the clutch de-couples, which means the crown and case become one unit, and the movement and stem become another. In the unlikely event of serious shock, where the movement moves within the case, this decoupling means that the stem would never bear any load, and the wide clearance between the stem and stem tube facilitates that. The conventional designs do not offer this built-in protection.

 

For further information on the engineering of the Amphibia, this is a good start:

 

http://forums.watchuseek.com/f54/vostok-amphibia-analysis-design-methodology-491757.html

 

This is my personal Amphibia, modified with a sterile bezel that I will sandblast to match the matte tonneau case (so 70s!) and on a mesh strap (so 70s!):

 

 

 

 

The Shturmanskie chronograph was acquired because it is, IMO the best mechanical chronograph (vintage or new) you can get for that price range (under $500). When you factor in its history, military issue, reliability, and quality of engineering (mine has a power reserve of about 60 hours), along with the unique styling, it becomes a staple in a vintage collection. It doesnt hurt that they are gaining value quickly. The naval version, known as the OKEAH (ocean), is much more expensive as the exposure to marine environments makes quality examples very difficult to find.

 

I highly recommend anyone looking to expand their collections to examine Russian watches. Their current and vintage offerings allow you to get a variety of high quality, functional watches for pennies compared to Swiss or German counterparts, especially if you are looking for a fun summer watch to wear on a NATO or a diver you wont be afraid to knock around.


Edited by DerangedGoose - 7/5/14 at 5:34pm
post #33422 of 48312

DG, I love you watch collection and hearing more about why you chose specific pieces.  The military chronograph is my favorite of the bunch for the pop of color.

post #33423 of 48312

15300 today and my curious pup.

His nose is almost as big as my fist. 

post #33424 of 48312
Dog pics are always welcome! (Cats too, I guess?!)


I wore this one pretty much all of last week while on vacation... Seamaster 2254.50... I recently switched it from the Omega rubber to an "admiralty gray" NATO.

post #33425 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by bkotsko View Post

15300 today and my curious pup.


His nose is almost as big as my fist. 
He is probably thinking "Great...as if pictures of his shoes wasn't enough...".
post #33426 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by CMT1 View Post

I've been wearing the Sun/Moon a lot lately, mostly at night when I do not have to worry about sweating through and accelerating wear on the strap, but I do clown it up on the weekends when out and about with my miscreant friends. I'll spare you the photo of my 112 on the super gauche SNPR "1776" strap that I'll be wearing out and about with the rest of the idiots on Friday. nod[1].gif

 

As one who gallivants with like-minded idiots, I want to see the PAM!   Reverso is lovely, btw. 

post #33427 of 48312
Too many mention of Coke recently, so I felt obliged to post the pics of mine, circa 1999-2000. The watch I bought as a graduation gift to myself after the grad school!

uzejy9u4.jpg

ege8yruh.jpg

And while there, here is another one for the JLC fans

yrejynyj.jpg
post #33428 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by alpyigit View Post

Too many mention of Coke recently, so I felt obliged to post the pics of mine, circa 1999-2000. The watch I bought as a graduation gift to myself after the grad school!



 

Pepsi for me

 

 

post #33429 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by suaviter View Post

As one who gallivants with like-minded idiots, I want to see the PAM!   Reverso is lovely, btw. 

Heh. Thanks. OK, here's my stunningly classy July 4th evening carousing combo fistbump.gif:
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)






I proceeded to wear this for the rest of the weekend:



I hope everyone's Independence Day Weekend went well.
post #33430 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by dddrees View Post

Pepsi for me Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)


said it before, ill say it again. i love this watch and i love this pic.
post #33431 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by in stitches View Post


said it before, ill say it again. i love this watch and i love this pic.


Thank you sir, it's definitely one of my favorites.

post #33432 of 48312
Back again to get help on deciding what to buy. For reference I just bought an oyster bracelet smooth bezel silver dial stick marker 36mm Datejust. Looking for something more sporty/casual to alternate it with. My requirements are:
  • It's on bracelet and versatile for dressing up and down
  • Can be found under 4k relatively easily
  • Not too thick as I wear long sleeve dress shirts for work
  • Doesn't exceed 40-42mm, as I don't like big watches and have relatively small wrists (6 3/4")

1) Rolex Explorer 114270- I probably would have pulled the trigger already on this, but I cannot find one locally to confirm I love it in person. On the web I am a huge fan- beautiful, uncluttered dial, sporty looking but can be dressed up, a real classic in my mind. I do like the case/bracelet/size of the 39mm but it exceeds my budget and I hate the white gold 3/6/9. My concern is that it would wear too similar to the DJ and isn't as much contrast as you'd want with a 2 watch collection. Again, it's also impossible to find locally so I am having to rely on comparison pics with the newer DJ to have a feel for how it wears. No date is a small but notable pain point.



2) Omega Planet Ocean 2500- the 8500 version is out as it's too thick and I don't like the ceramic bezel. It's been a couple of years since I have seen one in person but I remember loving it, it's one of the very few divers that 'bring it all together' for me. My qualm is that I don't love it as much as the Explorer and I think I really would prefer something that disappears on the wrist, this would be a stark contrast in weight.




Two very different watches, yes, but I am torn...
post #33433 of 48312

BBB - What about a Tudor Ranger on a bracelet?  It is similar to the Explorer I

post #33434 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigbadbuff View Post

Back again to get help on deciding what to buy. For reference I just bought an oyster bracelet smooth bezel silver dial stick marker 36mm Datejust. Looking for something more sporty/casual to alternate it with. My requirements are:
  • It's on bracelet and versatile for dressing up and down
  • Can be found under 4k relatively easily
  • Not too thick as I wear long sleeve dress shirts for work
  • Doesn't exceed 40-42mm, as I don't like big watches and have relatively small wrists (6 3/4")

1) Rolex Explorer 114270- I probably would have pulled the trigger already on this, but I cannot find one locally to confirm I love it in person. On the web I am a huge fan- beautiful, uncluttered dial, sporty looking but can be dressed up, a real classic in my mind. I do like the case/bracelet/size of the 39mm but it exceeds my budget and I hate the white gold 3/6/9. My concern is that it would wear too similar to the DJ and isn't as much contrast as you'd want with a 2 watch collection. Again, it's also impossible to find locally so I am having to rely on comparison pics with the newer DJ to have a feel for how it wears. No date is a small but notable pain point.


2) Omega Planet Ocean 2500- the 8500 version is out as it's too thick and I don't like the ceramic bezel. It's been a couple of years since I have seen one in person but I remember loving it, it's one of the very few divers that 'bring it all together' for me. My qualm is that I don't love it as much as the Explorer and I think I really would prefer something that disappears on the wrist, this would be a stark contrast in weight.

Two very different watches, yes, but I am torn...

The 114270 wears the same as a 36mm DJ.  They are the same dimensions and roughly the same thickness, although the Ex1 might be a tad slimmer if one counts the fact that it does not have a cyclops magnifier on the crystal.  I really liked my 114270.  Its a very clean looking watch, it flies under the radar and can be worn with casual clothes or a suit if necessary.  

 

The dials are very different - silver with sticks and a date v. black dial with Arabic numerals and no date.  Also not sure how old your DJ is, but if its NOT a modern one, then it has the old clam shell end links, hollow center link bracelet and a standard clasp.  The 114270 will have solid end links, hollow center links, and an Oysterlock clasp.  I prefer the 114270 bracelet to the older DJ bracelets.  That being said, I'm not sure that you will feel the 2 watches are different enough, although I've met people that have more than one DJ.  

 

If you don't love the Seamaster, don't buy it.  Save up and get something you truly want, be it a 39mm Explorer or something else.

post #33435 of 48312
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