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The Watch Appreciation Thread (Reviews and Photos of Men's Timepieces by Rolex, Patek Philippe, Breitling, JLC etc...) - Page 2222  

post #33316 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by bkotsko View Post

I wish it was 38mm.
I would be all over it.
I'd be all over it at 36, too. Maybe I should just hold out for a nice, older Explorer.
post #33317 of 48312
Oh hai guize....

e7adetah.jpg
post #33318 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by tifosi View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cant kill da Rooster View Post

I like the Blue better all around. Maybe just because it's newer. Just picked up the THC.
I may have a look at the new Ranger when it is available. It's a little large for what it is, but it will make a nice beater.

You know you've probably reached a good point in your life when you consider a 3k watch a beater.
post #33319 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by in stitches View Post

Oh hai guize....

e7adetah.jpg

 

Am I going to regret asking how you took a picture when both arms are in front of you?  Chin shot?  But I do like the looks of that IWC!

post #33320 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cant kill da Rooster View Post

You know you've probably reached a good point in your life when you consider a 3k watch a beater.
All of my watches are/were beaters. I use the term more along the lines of Daily Driver. I guess daily driver sounds better. haha
post #33321 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbarwick View Post

Am I going to regret asking how you took a picture when both arms are in front of you?  Chin shot?  But I do like the looks of that IWC!

lol, someone else in the office took the pic for me. there was also a 50k diamond cartier baloon bleu in the lot, but i did not don it.

the IWC is the best one. the breitlings are neat, i like the navitmer more than the bentley, and both very pricey, but not my thing.
post #33322 of 48312

I have to admit I like the busy instrumentation look of the Navitimer, but I don't like the trend of trying to dress up tool watches by adding gold. Seems too third world dictator to me.

post #33323 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by Belligero View Post

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Hey, my pleasure. But don't put too much stock in my opining; I'm a cynical bastard with curmudgeonly tastes when it comes to this watch stuff.

The advantage of sourcing a Sinn from Germany is that you can get a better deal on a new one by buying directly from the source (they have a small but complete sales floor in their Frankfurt facility), but you end up with the same watch no matter where you buy it. In general, the US market is one of the cheapest for watches; new Sinns are a bit of an exception. If you're buying secondhand, it's unlikely that there will be significantly better prices elsewhere.

Typical watch-nerd specifications mean very little to me, but design and manufacturing integrity mean a lot. I've been to Sinn's factory in Frankfurt a few times, and it makes me appreciate the watches more when I've seen where they're made and met some of the folks who do it.

Sinn makes a quality watch. So does Rolex, which I mention since you were also thinking about an Air-King. Although I haven't had the pleasure of seeing them produced firsthand, a good friend of mine is a watchmaker who's had two tours of Rolex's facilities, and there's no doubt that they do things the right way. If the AK or other models appeal, they're certainly worth further consideration. I find that they're among the few that are worth the asking price, all things considered.

Take your time, pick the one that means the most to you, and don't get too hung up on the initial price. Like all non-essential items, you're ultimately buying an emotion
.
Thanks a bunch for your wise advice. I wish I'd known about Sinn when I was going to Germany regularly. Ordered the watch from Watchbuys last night. I like their option of shipping to RGM for warrantee work and a couple other little perks. Thanks for that interesting link too. The person in my sig wrote about "intellectual conversion" which fits very well with that link's point that it's not the physical stuff that "makes" us happy.

Quote:
Originally Posted by no frills View Post

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
My two cents: you might not be a fan of Rolex's image or marketing. Like Belli's note above, you might not even care about what other WIS might say - including me. But me, personally? I like looking at what actual watchmakers do, and what they choose to wear, and other watchmakers they respect.

And I've seen senior watchmakers from Greubel Forsey, AP and VC gush about Rolex and their facilities and processes. And I've seen Patek watchmakers wearing Rolexes - while working at the Patek offices!

Maybe they're victims of the Rolex marketing machine too
.
Thanks too, F. Rolex definitely elicits strong feelings. An uncle of mine is a watch collector and has always praised Rolex. I'd never been really into watches in general, but after reading up about them the past year or so, I've definitely grown in appreciation of them and of Rolex in particular. I didn't realize how important they've been in terms of developing designs and technologies that so many have copied.
post #33324 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by emptym View Post


Thanks too, F. Rolex definitely elicits strong feelings. An uncle of mine is a watch collector and has always praised Rolex. I'd never been really into watches in general, but after reading up about them the past year or so, I've definitely grown in appreciation of them and of Rolex in particular. I didn't realize how important they've been in terms of developing designs and technologies that so many have copied.

 

Someone feel free to point out examples if I'm wrong, but I don't think Rolex is much of an innovator. Almost all of their watches use the same basic design and are based off the same movement, which doesn't have that much that stands out about it. The free sprung balance wheel that distinguishes their movement wasn't their invention IIRC. Their strength lies in producing a basic but well-executed piece that is generic enough to fit into a broad audience's tastes and high quality enough to sustain interest. People are familiar with their products and trust them due to their history and consistency; there aren't a lot of models they've made that venture outside of the mold and the ones they have made weren't very successful.

post #33325 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tsujigiri View Post

Someone feel free to point out examples if I'm wrong, but I don't think Rolex is much of an innovator. Almost all of their watches use the same basic design and are based off the same movement, which doesn't have that much that stands out about it. The free sprung balance wheel that distinguishes their movement wasn't their invention IIRC. Their strength lies in producing a basic but well-executed piece that is generic enough to fit into a broad audience's tastes and high quality enough to sustain interest. People are familiar with their products and trust them due to their history and consistency; there aren't a lot of models they've made that venture outside of the mold and the ones they have made weren't very successful.
You are thinking of Rolex now...not when they started. I would consider waterproof watches and self-winding watches innovations.
post #33326 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tsujigiri View Post

Someone feel free to point out examples if I'm wrong, but I don't think Rolex is much of an innovator. Almost all of their watches use the same basic design and are based off the same movement, which doesn't have that much that stands out about it. The free sprung balance wheel that distinguishes their movement wasn't their invention IIRC. Their strength lies in producing a basic but well-executed piece that is generic enough to fit into a broad audience's tastes and high quality enough to sustain interest. People are familiar with their products and trust them due to their history and consistency; there aren't a lot of models they've made that venture outside of the mold and the ones they have made weren't very successful.
While the dial layout is horrific, I think the Sky-Dweller is a fantastic, innovative watch. And kudos to Rolex for finally adding a date function to their lineup.
post #33327 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by tifosi View Post

You are thinking of Rolex now...not when they started. I would consider waterproof watches and self-winding watches innovations.

this. also, their models are probably some of the most oft imitated/copied/homaged watches out there. pretty clear imo that their designs, while maybe now we consider them classic/old hat, were actually quite new and different at their release.
post #33328 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tsujigiri View Post
 

 

Someone feel free to point out examples if I'm wrong, but I don't think Rolex is much of an innovator. Almost all of their watches use the same basic design and are based off the same movement, which doesn't have that much that stands out about it. The free sprung balance wheel that distinguishes their movement wasn't their invention IIRC. Their strength lies in producing a basic but well-executed piece that is generic enough to fit into a broad audience's tastes and high quality enough to sustain interest. People are familiar with their products and trust them due to their history and consistency; there aren't a lot of models they've made that venture outside of the mold and the ones they have made weren't very successful.

I am not a Rolex fanboy, and own quite a few non-rolex watches, but if you go to their website you will read:

  • 1910 - first chronometer certification
  • 1926 - first waterproof watch
  • 1931 - first self winding movement with a "perpetual" rotor
  • 1945 - first automatic watch with date in a window on the dial
  • 1953 - first watch rated for 100m
  • 1956 - the first wristwatch to display the date and day of the week in full in a window on the dial
  • 1956 - Milgauss rated for 1000 gauss (not sure if this was the first)
  • 1985 - 904L steel introduced into full production
  • 2000 - 4130 movement
  • 2005 - Cerachrom bezel
  • 2005 - blue Parachrom hairspring
  • 2007 - Yacht-Master II the first watchequipped with a programmable countdown with a mechanical memory
  • 2012 - Sky-Dweller movement with the "command" bezel

 

Many of those things are innovative to me as an engineer.

post #33329 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by bkotsko View Post

I am not a Rolex fanboy, and own quite a few non-rolex watches, but if you go to their website you will read:
  • 1910 - first chronometer certification
  • 1926 - first waterproof watch
  • 1931 - first self winding movement with a "perpetual" rotor
  • 1945 - first automatic watch with date in a window on the dial
  • 1953 - first watch rated for 100m
  • 1956 - the first wristwatch to display the date and day of the week in full in a window on the dial
  • 1956 - Milgauss rated for 1000 gauss (not sure if this was the first)
  • 1985 - 904L steel introduced into full production
  • 2000 - 4130 movement
  • 2005 - Cerachrom bezel
  • 2005 - blue Parachrom hairspring
  • 2007 - Yacht-Master II the first watchequipped with a programmable countdown with a mechanical memory
  • 2012 - Sky-Dweller movement with the "command" bezel

Many of those things are innovative to me as an engineer.
Pssshhhhhh...That's all you got??? haha
post #33330 of 48312
yellow gold skydweller is one of my grail watches
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