or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › The Watch Appreciation Thread (Reviews and Photos of Men's Timepieces by Rolex, Patek Philippe, Breitling, JLC etc...)
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

The Watch Appreciation Thread (Reviews and Photos of Men's Timepieces by Rolex, Patek Philippe, Breitling, JLC etc...) - Page 2207  

post #33091 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dino944 View Post

In watches, gold is 18Kt gold, which is 75% gold 25% alloy  (many 18kt gold watches are marked 750, meaning its 750 parts per thousand gold, hence 75% gold 25 alloy.  It would be too soft for daily wear if the gold content was higher.  If something is 14Kt gold its a bit more durable but its only 58.5% gold and 41.5% alloy.  Most platinum watches are 95% percent platinum (often marked PT 950), and 5% alloy, but platinum is far more durable.  

all correct, as usual!

most gold watches from the brands we discuss are 18k. they used to do 14k sometimes a while back, and i have seen vintage pieces stamped 14k for lots of brands, but 18k has become the standard. as far as i see, they really do look almost the same, thought you can feel the weight difference. i really think they do it for the prestige more than anything. 18k is just fancier than 14k, and obviously the extra gold content is part of that, and, of course, adds a lot to the price.
post #33092 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by in stitches View Post

most gold watches from the brands we discuss are 18k. they used to do 14k sometimes a while back, and i have seen vintage pieces stamped 14k for lots of brands, but 18k has become the standard. as far as i see, they really do look almost the same, thought you can feel the weight difference. i really think they do it for the prestige more than anything. 18k is just fancier than 14k, and obviously the extra gold content is part of that, and, of course, adds a lot to the price.

 

Gets softer as you go up the 24K scale though!  Dammit!

 

Someone needs to come up with virtually scratch proof gold with at least 75% content, mix in the super-hard material in the "other" 25%. I'd sign up for that.

 

Then Rolex can take adapt it for their precious metal watches, come up with some fancy UltraHard(On)Gold(TM) name and use that as part of their pitch! 

post #33093 of 48312
If it was simple, I am sure it would already exist. smile.gif

Any alchemists here?
post #33094 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by in stitches View Post

If it was simple, I am sure it would already exist. smile.gif

Any alchemists here?
No, but I did stay at a Holiday Inn Express last night...
post #33095 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by in stitches View Post


all correct, as usual!

most gold watches from the brands we discuss are 18k. they used to do 14k sometimes a while back, and i have seen vintage pieces stamped 14k for lots of brands, but 18k has become the standard. as far as i see, they really do look almost the same, thought you can feel the weight difference. i really think they do it for the prestige more than anything. 18k is just fancier than 14k, and obviously the extra gold content is part of that, and, of course, adds a lot to the price.

:fistbump:

 

The big three have all used 18Kt or Pt for what seems like forever, although on occasion I've seen I think on old pocket watch in 14.  Rolex still used 14Kt on some watches up through about the mid 1980s.  Hence all tutone Subs, GMTs, and DJs up until the mid 80s are 14Kt and steel, rather than 18kt and steel that we are more commonly accustomed to seeing.  In addition, they offered an oyster perpetual in all 14kt including the bracelet, but I think that might have been a 34mm model, and at least until maybe the late 1970s, the Daytona was offered in all steel, 14Kt or 18Kt.  I believe they may have done away with the 14Kt gold Daytonas by the late 70s or early 80s as all the 14Kt Daytonas I've seen seem to be from the early to mid 1970s.  

 

I agree, its simply a more upmarket move to go from 14Kt to 18kt, and it allows them to charge more. :cheers:

post #33096 of 48312

Rolesium!

post #33097 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by DerangedGoose View Post

Somehow the Lange 1 dial seemed really haphazard to me, but this one I found extremely impressive:



I've seen the Double Split in person - its movement is pretty impressive.

It's really big though, a little tough to wear. Heavy as heck too.
post #33098 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by in stitches View Post

all correct, as usual!

most gold watches from the brands we discuss are 18k. they used to do 14k sometimes a while back, and i have seen vintage pieces stamped 14k for lots of brands, but 18k has become the standard. as far as i see, they really do look almost the same, thought you can feel the weight difference. i really think they do it for the prestige more than anything. 18k is just fancier than 14k, and obviously the extra gold content is part of that, and, of course, adds a lot to the price.

One thing about 14k is that they tended to be the standard adopted by French and the majority of US casemakers. In the vintage era Swiss brands would ship over the movements to, for example, the US, and then have them cased up by case factories in the US to get around prohibitive taxes. So there was some variance, for better or worse, in many of these vintage pieces.

14k is actually quite a good composition - very hardy and practical. It's still favored for fountain pen nibs over 18k, but alas consumer preference and all for more "luxurious" materials.
post #33099 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by no frills View Post

Gets softer as you go up the 24K scale though!  Dammit!

Someone needs to come up with virtually scratch proof gold with at least 75% content, mix in the super-hard material in the "other" 25%. I'd sign up for that.

Then Rolex can take adapt it for their precious metal watches, come up with some fancy UltraHard(On)Gold(TM) name and use that as part of their pitch! 

I think Lange has some sort of special super hard gold, can't remember what they call it (honey gold or something), but they only use it for their higher-end pieces.
post #33100 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hayward View Post

Rolesium!

Tridor!
post #33101 of 48312
So I was at the launch of the new JLC Geophysic 1958 last night in Singapore - had a great time checking out the watches and catching up with old friends. The new watches are quite pretty - simple and elegant. Although considering they are priced similarly to time-only Reversos in their respective metals, I think I'd still choose a Reverso. The new 1948 is tres chic.

There was this badass leather bound JLC traveling trunk, which they apparently give you if you buy 3 grand comps (no kidding!). Looked like something Vuitton would have made a century ago.

Will post some pics when I get them from the camera, but in the meantime here're a couple random shots from my trip to the VC factory in Plan-les-Ouates. You can see the room where they assemble their high complications (they have very cool watchmaking tables that have all sorts of neat gadgetry), and also a shot of the futuristic Piaget factory (taken from inside a car speeding past)




post #33102 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by ~ B ~ View Post

14k is actually quite a good composition - very hardy and practical. It's still favored for fountain pen nibs over 18k, but alas consumer preference and all for more "luxurious" materials.

exactly this. an 18k case will show those little dings and dents much faster than 14k
Quote:
Originally Posted by ~ B ~ View Post

I think Lange has some sort of special super hard gold, can't remember what they call it (honey gold or something), but they only use it for their higher-end pieces.

as opposed to their el-cheapo models, lol. tongue.gif

---

dino - spot on. most of the older 14k case i see, are indeed pocket watches.
post #33103 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by in stitches View Post

If it was simple, I am sure it would already exist. smile.gif

Any alchemists here?

LOL my bachelor's degree is in chemistry, but I haven't worked in a lab for years, and never really focused on metallurgy.

Plus, most of my watches are stainless anyway shog[1].gif
post #33104 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dino944 View Post

fistbump.gif

The big three have all used 18Kt or Pt for what seems like forever, although on occasion I've seen I think on old pocket watch in 14.  Rolex still used 14Kt on some watches up through about the mid 1980s.  Hence all tutone Subs, GMTs, and DJs up until the mid 80s are 14Kt and steel, rather than 18kt and steel that we are more commonly accustomed to seeing.  In addition, they offered an oyster perpetual in all 14kt including the bracelet, but I think that might have been a 34mm model, and at least until maybe the late 1970s, the Daytona was offered in all steel, 14Kt or 18Kt.  I believe they may have done away with the 14Kt gold Daytonas by the late 70s or early 80s as all the 14Kt Daytonas I've seen seem to be from the early to mid 1970s.  

I agree, its simply a more upmarket move to go from 14Kt to 18kt, and it allows them to charge more. cheers.gif

I bought a gold and stainless Datejust in Paris in 1983. All of the middle links were gold, except the two that joined the band to the watch, which were stainless. When I asked the AD why that was, he told me that, while DJs sold in other countries were made of 14kt, the ones sold in France were required (by law!) to be 18kt. So that the French Rolex dealers would not be at a price disadvantage to their competitors in other countries, they saved money by using two stainless links.

I have no idea whether this was true, but I thought it looked odd. So, about a year later, I ordered two 18kt links and had the two stainless ones replaced. I don't remember the exact figures after these many years, but I do recall that the cost of the two links was about 1/4 the price of the watch!
post #33105 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by in stitches View Post

as opposed to their el-cheapo models, lol. tongue.gif

lol yeap! I thought that too - for the prices they charge if I was CEO of Lange I would put this badass gold all across their range. That would give their entry-level models a greater competitive edge against their rivals.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
This thread is locked  
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › The Watch Appreciation Thread (Reviews and Photos of Men's Timepieces by Rolex, Patek Philippe, Breitling, JLC etc...)