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The Watch Appreciation Thread (Reviews and Photos of Men's Timepieces by Rolex, Patek Philippe, Breitling, JLC etc...) - Page 2006  

post #30076 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by no frills View Post

Many grey market sellers offer warranties for the pieces they sell - and allow you to verify with the watchmaker themselves if the timepiece is legitimate. Patek regularly services timepieces purchased from the secondary market, given the kind of turnover their watches go through.

Also, if you're gunning for a discontinued piece you may have no choice but to go outside the AD route.

I purchased my grand complication Pateks from a grey market dealer and I couldn't be happier. Mint, complete, and every time I've run into issues they literally picked up the watch from my office to bring it to Patek for servicing. And yes, they paid for it. Whether it was for a strap change, an installation of a new deployant clasp, or the recent repair of my 3970P's dislodged pusher cap.

As always - buy the seller.


Could you share some recommendations for sellers you trust?
post #30077 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by no frills View Post

Many grey market sellers offer warranties for the pieces they sell - and allow you to verify with the watchmaker themselves if the timepiece is legitimate. Patek regularly services timepieces purchased from the secondary market, given the kind of turnover their watches go through.

Also, if you're gunning for a discontinued piece you may have no choice but to go outside the AD route.

I purchased my grand complication Pateks from a grey market dealer and I couldn't be happier. Mint, complete, and every time I've run into issues they literally picked up the watch from my office to bring it to Patek for servicing. And yes, they paid for it. Whether it was for a strap change, an installation of a new deployant clasp, or the recent repair of my 3970P's dislodged pusher cap.

As always - buy the seller.

+1. I don't have anything in those leagues but I have found that the trusted grey market guys provide incredible customer service. Unlike a store, they rely entirely on feedbacks and referrals. It's about as VIP as it gets once you've established a relationship.
post #30078 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by CMT1 View Post

Very nice piece! Given the hint, it seemed like a logical guess. 
I'm pretty excited. I like the desk clock style mechanism and the use of the frederic piguet caliber 6.10 was the selling point. Sculptural object wrapping a grade A movement? I'll take it.

Not my photos


post #30079 of 48312
VERY nice indeed.
post #30080 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by edmorel View Post


well swatch did that some time ago with their "high end" brands and the grey market price went up10-15% (the dealer's wholesale prices went from 50% below MSRP to 40%). It stuck, the natives did not tak.... Something like Omega though, they essentially have a price ceiling on what they can charge for their watches and they need to do more volume than an AP or Cartier.

 

Even Swatch are going heavily towards solus boutiques: with their massive promotional push over the last few years, with ads, placements (007 etc) and sponsorships, Omega has really been pushed as a Rolex alternative.  I think the perceived exclusivity of their own boutiques has been an important tool in that brand strategy.  Prices rising accordingly too, of course.  So I've seen a lot of consolidation of agencies and opening of tailored Omega-only boutiques in this region.  In Jordan a few weeks ago I even saw a new boutique for Tissot.  Raymond Weil have gone that route in a big way around here too.  It seems to me that price control is a big part, but the "luxury brand" tag is what they're really after.  It allows a maker that's not necessarily seen as exclusive in Europe or the US, to present itself as high end in developing markets - like Rado have done in India.  But in Omega's case, they've gone big after the Rolex segment even in the most established markets.  And of course, once you're being presented as "premium", you can charge accordingly too.

 

The risks of holding stock are definitely there, but in most cases, makers don't own these boutiques: they design and define them, then extract them as a quid pro quo from their distributors as the cost of keeping the agency: in my small local market, the Swatch people have opened a beautiful Omega-only outlet, as well as a couple of Swatch shops, literally alongside their existing retail space.  This was the price for them of getting Omega away from its original agent and with them like the rest of the Swatch brands.  Only Breguet is still with someone else, but it's a matter of time.  Panerai and Patek have both insisted on their own boutiques as the price of keeping the business within the last two years.  Rolex share space in their dealer's outlet, but they got to design the whole place, and they are the only brand displayed on the external signage.  The makers are really leaning on their distributors to get the premium space and outlets in their own names.

 

So the risk of being stuck with a lot of product doesn't sit on on the likes of Omega.  It sits on the company that it forced to open Omega boutiques.  I suppose the risk to the maker is that in some cases if business falls down, the distributor will just give up, close down and have a fire sale of products, which could be damaging in the short term if it's a big outlet.  But that's not going to happen often.  In the  mean time the retailer has a big investment to make in a boutique if he wants to keep selling, and a smaller margin too, while the maker gets better space, more price control, an enhanced brand image and a larger unit margin.  No wonder retail prices have risen.  

post #30081 of 48312
I had to think about it carefully, but I've ended up buying the vast majority of my timepieces from an AD. I'm comfortable and have used a gray or two, but the AD's have usually been able to come up with the incentives, selection and instant gratification for me to justify going with them. Not to mention a certain stunner of an SA that I might have written about before...
post #30082 of 48312

:lol:

 

I can empathise.  Though we've yet to consummate a purchase, and they are in fact in a neighbouring country, I do occasionally find my mind wandering into the Lange boutique in Dubai Mall and lingering for a while with the delightful Svetlana and Shen-shen.  I have fantasised about getting my hands on...some of their watches.

 

Funnily enough I can't remember the names of the Indian dudes who sell Lange locally.  Even though I've met them many more times.  Must be because they sell other watches too, dilutes the impact.

post #30083 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by mimo View Post

lol8%5B1%5D.gif

I can empathise.  Though we've yet to consummate a purchase, and they are in fact in a neighbouring country, I do occasionally find my mind wandering into the Lange boutique in Dubai Mall and lingering for a while with the delightful Svetlana and Shen-shen.  I have fantasised about getting my hands on...some of their watches.

Funnily enough I can't remember the names of the Indian dudes who sell Lange locally.  Even though I've met them many more times.  Must be because they sell other watches too, dilutes the impact.

Evidently some sale staff are more memorable than others. wink.gif
post #30084 of 48312
i was in an omega boutique not too long ago and it sucked. the people working there clearly did not know jack about watches and were just spewing out whatever they were taught in training like omeeeega parrots. not to mention it was in some back corner of a mall and there was no feeling of exclusivity/fancy-pants-ness or anything special at all really about the space or ambiance.

kind of the exact opposite of what they claimed they were trying to do with these boutiques. if they are mostly like this, the idea will fail imo.
post #30085 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by in stitches View Post

i was in an omega boutique not too long ago and it sucked. the people working there clearly did not know jack about watches and were just spewing out whatever they were taught in training like omeeeega parrots. not to mention it was in some back corner of a mall and there was no feeling of exclusivity/fancy-pants-ness or anything special at all really about the space or ambiance.

kind of the exact opposite of what they claimed they were trying to do with these boutiques. if they are mostly like this, the idea will fail imo.

By me, the only option for Omega is Torneau. I feel like I need to wash my hands when I walk out of there. I bought mine online.
post #30086 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by in stitches View Post

i was in an omega boutique not too long ago and it sucked. the people working there clearly did not know jack about watches and were just spewing out whatever they were taught in training like omeeeega parrots. not to mention it was in some back corner of a mall and there was no feeling of exclusivity/fancy-pants-ness or anything special at all really about the space or ambiance.

kind of the exact opposite of what they claimed they were trying to do with these boutiques. if they are mostly like this, the idea will fail imo.


I've been in the Omega boutique in the King of Prussia mall. At first, I thought the same, but that was more of a sales front. We got to talking about the history of Lemania and chronographs in general, some cool vintage calibers/watches that had come in for service (the Speedy with the 321 some guy picked up at a yard sale for next to nothing), and where they thought the brand was going in general. It was a fun time, and the two people I talked to were very knowledgeable, and not just about their brand. I suppose they are like most stores where experiences can vary depending on the staff they choose to hire.

post #30087 of 48312
There's a guy, forgot his name but I have his card, at the Omega in Boca that is quite good and knowledgeable about not just omega but many other makers. I was wearing the GL1 and he started talking about the brand and what he liked about it. I think when I finally pull the trigger on a PO I'll go talk to him (my sweetheart at the other AD doesn't carry omega)
post #30088 of 48312
i imagine it depends on the particular SA in each place, but ime, they are not consistent in the quality of their hires.
post #30089 of 48312
Oh snap! She doesn't want to Let It Go!

6erubyqu.jpg

Icy blue and cold steel looks good on her though.
post #30090 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by in stitches View Post

i was in an omega boutique not too long ago and it sucked. the people working there clearly did not know jack about watches and were just spewing out whatever they were taught in training like omeeeega parrots. not to mention it was in some back corner of a mall and there was no feeling of exclusivity/fancy-pants-ness or anything special at all really about the space or ambiance.

kind of the exact opposite of what they claimed they were trying to do with these boutiques. if they are mostly like this, the idea will fail imo.

 

Yes, I've seen the same.  To be fair, you tend to get a lot of brand evangelism from salespeople in any watch boutique, as there's normally a lead person for each brand who gets special incentives from them.  You're still right: new boutiques means rapid expansion i.e. new people, combined with accelerated brainwash training.  But I doubt they'll fail for that reason at least: Hublot and Breitling aren't shifting volume based on knowledgeable salesmen any more than they are on knowledgeable customers, they're shifting it on brand awareness.  Omega will do the same: it's there in the mall, it's expensive, and it's on TV.  It will sell.

 

Finding someone who just really loves the subject and is as happy talking about other makers as he is about his own stock, is a rare joy in this kind of environment.  I spent over an hour with that dude who showed me the VCs the other day, who knew damn well I wasn't going to buy one (I told him!).  But in a small shop that you'd have to go out of the way to visit, that sells Greubel Forsey and Roger Dubuis alongside VC and IWC, I guess it was always more likely that it would be run by someone who just wanted to talk watches.  We spent half the time talking about Lange and GO and the history of the Glashutte makers.  None of which they stock.  And I'll tell you something: it makes me want to do business with that guy more than the others.  

 

Also, they are the people who fixed up my old Omega for next to nothing when the new mega-agent failed, despite having lost the distributorship over two years ago.  And it was that watch repair that led to my coming to TWAT in the first place.  Funny how things turn out.  You bastards. :)  

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