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The Watch Appreciation Thread (Reviews and Photos of Men's Timepieces by Rolex, Patek Philippe, Breitling, JLC etc...) - Page 1705  

post #25561 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevent View Post

Starting to get into watches and am debating to spend the Hamilton / Stowa /Junghans range or to move onto a little higher range at Nomos. (or any brand recs in the $500-700 / $~2000 ranges) Cost isn't a major issue but just wondering if it's better to get a "starter" watch to get used to it first or to just go in. Do prefer components and build and want something simple and reasonably versatile. And one more dumb question, is it necessary to get a rotation of watches? Or is one just fine?

Wearing a simple timex now.

 

I plan on getting a Hamilton Intra Matic* for $600 from Jomashop before to long. As I like the looks of that watch at least as much as anything I've seen from Stowa, Frederique Constant, Who Ever in the next price bracket ... I'm not seeing the point in spending $1,500 on a watch as I don't expect a $1,500 watch to appreciate in value and I don't expect a $600 Hamilton to shit the bed any time soon. Granted, there's always the self satisfaction that goes along with knowing that you spent more on your Stowa than most of the guys running around in their Hamiltons and Tissots but again, I like the looks of the Hamilton better, so...

 

*

post #25562 of 48312

Frilly, you might well be the coolest man I know.

post #25563 of 48312
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dino944 View Post

Great photo.  I love how you have combined various accessories such as the fedora and glasses into your wrist shot.
IMHO the answers to your questions depend on you.  Are you someone that isn't sure you want to get into owning nice watches so a Hamilton etc. would be putting your toe in the water to see if watches interest you?  Or do you see your self moving forward and buying more watches/selling or trading the ones you have?  Or would you simple collect and add to your collection?

Unless you aren't sure if nice watches truly interest you, I would say go for the nicest watch you want and can afford.  Its not like say learning to drive a standard transmission car and then deciding you want a racing car and then figuring you need to learn the handling dynamics of a sports car before going into cars with more powerful motors and maybe trickier handling.  If you would sell or trade the Hamilton in a short period of time, then why bother with it.  Buy what you want after you find a good price and skip the depreciation and having to find a buyer for your starter piece.  

I'm not really sure what you mean buy components and build.   Its not exactly like a car where you might change the suspension, and brakes or add a turbo/super charger.  

As for having 1 watch for everything or several watches, again that is up to you.  There are watches that are versatile and a person can wear them for most things.  But its tough for them to truly be perfect for every situation.  If you want a 1 watch for every occasion watches that seem to fit that model are things like a Rolex Datejust, Cartier Santos, or maybe an Omega Aqua Terra seem to fit that description.  They can be worn casually or dressy, and there are other offerings that might be more dressy or more sporty, depending on your taste and needs.  However, none will ever be as formal as a true dress watch, and none are as rugged and sporty as some of their siblings such as the Submariner, the Calibre, or the Seamaster.  I like having real sports watches for casual wear, true dress watches for formal events, and a watch or two that are versatile enough to be worn casually or with a suit.  In the end, what is right for you depends on your lifestyle, sense of style, and what you like.  Good luck and happy shopping. 

Well said. I dumped my Hamilton after one year at a small loss. The upside was that I became more interested in watches and understood better what I liked. Although Hamilton is great value for money (re: the argument above), it's about as vanilla as you can get in the watch world.
Edited by Cant kill da Rooster - 10/13/13 at 1:35am
post #25564 of 48312
Plus one to what Dino said.

Frills - that pic is your best yet. Excellent gray monochrome.
post #25565 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Dlwgosh View Post
 

 

I plan on getting a Hamilton Intra Matic* for $600 from Jomashop before to long. As I like the looks of that watch at least as much as anything I've seen from Stowa, Frederique Constant, Who Ever in the next price bracket ... I'm not seeing the point in spending $1,500 on a watch as I don't expect a $1,500 watch to appreciate in value and I don't expect a $600 Hamilton to shit the bed any time soon. Granted, there's always the self satisfaction that goes along with knowing that you spent more on your Stowa than most of the guys running around in their Hamiltons and Tissots but again, I like the looks of the Hamilton better, so...

 

*

 

That's a nice piece Bill - I like the design very much.  Hamilton has always done well for me over the years - I've owned maybe a half dozen.  Solid reliability and some cool designs for not a lot of dough.  I don't consider them to be vanilla in the least.  There are a very broad range of styles on offer - something to please a wide variety of aesthetic preferences.  And the prices are reasonable - you can certainly pay 8 or 9 k for watches with similar ETA-powered movements, but that is not a path I would recommend.  (And yes, there is more to a watch than just the movement, but in the realm of mechanical watches there is no single component of greater importance).

 

The Intramatic is a neat and clean retro design that appeals to me a whole bunch.

 

Also, I would most certainly NOT recommend that someone new to watches immediately purchase the most expensive watch they can possibly afford.  Unless, of course, they are the type of buyer that derives satisfaction primarily from brand ownership / bragging rights etc.  In which case they should just buy a random Rolex and call it a day. :)

post #25566 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by in stitches View Post

Plus one to what Dino said.Frills - that pic is your best yet. Excellent gray monochrome.

Hahah thanks mimo and stitchy!

Well palette today is blue, with a dash of purple and gray thrown in.

yjezunus.jpg
post #25567 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dino944 View Post

Great photo.  I love how you have combined various accessories such as the fedora and glasses into your wrist shot.
IMHO the answers to your questions depend on you.  Are you someone that isn't sure you want to get into owning nice watches so a Hamilton etc. would be putting your toe in the water to see if watches interest you?  Or do you see your self moving forward and buying more watches/selling or trading the ones you have?  Or would you simple collect and add to your collection?

Unless you aren't sure if nice watches truly interest you, I would say go for the nicest watch you want and can afford.  Its not like say learning to drive a standard transmission car and then deciding you want a racing car and then figuring you need to learn the handling dynamics of a sports car before going into cars with more powerful motors and maybe trickier handling.  If you would sell or trade the Hamilton in a short period of time, then why bother with it.  Buy what you want after you find a good price and skip the depreciation and having to find a buyer for your starter piece.  

I'm not really sure what you mean buy components and build.   Its not exactly like a car where you might change the suspension, and brakes or add a turbo/super charger.  

As for having 1 watch for everything or several watches, again that is up to you.  There are watches that are versatile and a person can wear them for most things.  But its tough for them to truly be perfect for every situation.  If you want a 1 watch for every occasion watches that seem to fit that model are things like a Rolex Datejust, Cartier Santos, or maybe an Omega Aqua Terra seem to fit that description.  They can be worn casually or dressy, and there are other offerings that might be more dressy or more sporty, depending on your taste and needs.  However, none will ever be as formal as a true dress watch, and none are as rugged and sporty as some of their siblings such as the Submariner, the Calibre, or the Seamaster.  I like having real sports watches for casual wear, true dress watches for formal events, and a watch or two that are versatile enough to be worn casually or with a suit.  In the end, what is right for you depends on your lifestyle, sense of style, and what you like.  Good luck and happy shopping. 

Quote:
Originally Posted by RogerP View Post

That's a nice piece Bill - I like the design very much.  Hamilton has always done well for me over the years - I've owned maybe a half dozen.  Solid reliability and some cool designs for not a lot of dough.  I don't consider them to be vanilla in the least.  There are a very broad range of styles on offer - something to please a wide variety of aesthetic preferences.  And the prices are reasonable - you can certainly pay 8 or 9 k for watches with similar ETA-powered movements, but that is not a path I would recommend.  (And yes, there is more to a watch than just the movement, but in the realm of mechanical watches there is no single component of greater importance).

The Intramatic is a neat and clean retro design that appeals to me a whole bunch.

Also, I would most certainly NOT recommend that someone new to watches immediately purchase the most expensive watch they can possibly afford.  Unless, of course, they are the type of buyer that derives satisfaction primarily from brand ownership / bragging rights etc.  In which case they should just buy a random Rolex and call it a day. smile.gif

Thanks for the replies, definitely more of the not sure if I will really enjoy the watch phase right now so will probably go for the Hamilton as it costs less than a pair of shoes. Any recs for the best place to get one?
post #25568 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevent View Post

Thanks for the replies, definitely more of the not sure if I will really enjoy the watch phase right now so will probably go for the Hamilton as it costs less than a pair of shoes. Any recs for the best place to get one?

 

I got my Hamilton through Amazon as it is a run of the mill Khaki auto and going through a B&M store, they would not budge too much on the price.  I know it is tire-kicking to make some jewelry store employee let you try on watches then you buy somewhere else but I did not mind.  Now when we bought my GMT we got it at an AD to start a relationship for the future.

post #25569 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevent View Post


Thanks for the replies, definitely more of the not sure if I will really enjoy the watch phase right now so will probably go for the Hamilton as it costs less than a pair of shoes. Any recs for the best place to get one?

Sounds like a good plan, but I'd encourage you to also try on some stuff from the next price range up: Ball/Oris (also eta movements), Alpina/Frederique Constant (in house movements), or maybe a vintage Rolex Oyster or Date which can be had for $2k or so if you look. I've owned all of those and a Hamilton. They all have their place in the world and each has given me much enjoyment.
post #25570 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChicagoRon View Post

Sounds like a good plan, but I'd encourage you to also try on some stuff from the next price range up: Ball/Oris (also eta movements), Alpina/Frederique Constant (in house movements), or maybe a vintage Rolex Oyster or Date which can be had for $2k or so if you look. I've owned all of those and a Hamilton. They all have their place in the world and each has given me much enjoyment.

Thanks for the recs, will take a look
post #25571 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevent View Post
 Any recs for the best place to get one?

 

jomashop.com

post #25572 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by RogerP View Post

 

Also, I would most certainly NOT recommend that someone new to watches immediately purchase the most expensive watch they can possibly afford.  Unless, of course, they are the type of buyer that derives satisfaction primarily from brand ownership / bragging rights etc.  In which case they should just buy a random Rolex and call it a day. :)

 

While I certainly wouldn't recommend buying a watch that breaks one's budget, I think the point of advice given above about going for the relatively more expensive piece is not about brand ownership or bragging rights.  The precise wording was "the nicest watch you want and can afford"... to avoid the rather common situation of going for the less expensive piece now for the sake of "prudence," only to really secretly want the more expensive piece and therefore derive less satisfaction from the less expensive piece... and then sell the less expensive piece at a loss to gun for the piece they really wanted in the first place.  The implicit assumption is that (a) you really want one specific piece versus another and (b) it happens to be more expensive than your other options. Good for you if you really, really, really want the cheaper option - even if you can afford the more expensive piece. But for many of us higher prices do tend to be correlated with more desirable pieces.

 

The general theme seems to be - pricing aside - make sure you really want what you're buying before pulling the trigger so there are fewer second thoughts or chances of regret later.

post #25573 of 48312

And now, a public service announcement.  The photographer Jaroslav Wieczorkiewicz came up with a novel concept: dressing models in very, very, very fast-moving milk and taking pictures like traditional 1940s pinups.  What does that even mean, you ask?  Here's an example:

 

 

Profile of his work here via SLR lounge.com:

 

http://www.slrlounge.com/traditional-40s-pinup-photos-models-wearing-high-speed-milk

 

The photographer's website here (warning: some photos are NSFW):

 

http://aurumlight.com/

 

Also, just so this isn't completely OT, here's a picture of a watch: one of three known examples of the Patek 1563, a split seconds chrono variation of the 1463.  This piece pictured also has luminous Breguet numerals, which the other two supposedly does not have.  So apparently this is pretty rare, and will go up for auction via Christie's this November.  All info via Christie's/pic via Hodinkee:

 

 

Friend of mine went to a press event hosted by Christie's last Friday where the Hodinkee guys snapped these pics.  He has a pretty neat wrist shot of this piece. I asked him if he was going to bid for it, but I think the $850,000 to $1,500,000 estimate is beyond his budget.

post #25574 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by no frills View Post
 

 

While I certainly wouldn't recommend buying a watch that breaks one's budget, I think the point of advice given above about going for the relatively more expensive piece is not about brand ownership or bragging rights.  The precise wording was "the nicest watch you want and can afford"... to avoid the rather common situation of going for the less expensive piece now for the sake of "prudence," only to really secretly want the more expensive piece and therefore derive less satisfaction from the less expensive piece... and then sell the less expensive piece at a loss to gun for the piece they really wanted in the first place.  The implicit assumption is that (a) you really want one specific piece versus another and (b) it happens to be more expensive than your other options. Good for you if you really, really, really want the cheaper option - even if you can afford the more expensive piece. But for many of us higher prices do tend to be correlated with more desirable pieces.

 

The general theme seems to be - pricing aside - make sure you really want what you're buying before pulling the trigger so there are fewer second thoughts or chances of regret later.

 

Except that the advice as worded almost assumes that less expensive watches are inherently less desirable and less likely to be a source of enjoyment.  Which isn't necessarily the case.  Buying a more expensive piece also generally a carries a greater potential loss on resale if you find you are not as enamored with it as you hoped to be. And a newer collector is far more likely to find that his tastes change more rapidly than a seasoned collector, and hence will be more likely to be in the position of re-selling an early purchase.  How much money does one stand to lose on a $600 Hamilton?  Surely a lot less than on a $6,000 Omega.

 

All that said, I doubt anyone would dispute that making sure you really want the watch before you pull the trigger is the best way to go independent of price.

post #25575 of 48312
^^ Interesting. I didn't interpret Dino's statement like that at all. Anyone else think that's what Dino was trying to say?
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