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The Watch Appreciation Thread (Reviews and Photos of Men's Timepieces by Rolex, Patek Philippe, Breitling, JLC etc...) - Page 1292  

post #19366 of 48312


My only "dressy" shot.
post #19367 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by sinclear View Post



My only "dressy" shot.

 

Very nice. icon_gu_b_slayer[1].gif

post #19368 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

Generally, ebauches are the much cheaper route. After all, the development cost for the ebauche is spread amongst all the brands who adopt it and use it over many, many years. Also, the typical ebauche is made to be rugged, easy to assemble, and highly adaptable (for ease of installing complication modules). That's to say, they are made to accommodate the lowest pricing possible, not to be particularly elegant or refined.

In contrast, in-house movements must be newly developed and are not typically shared with other brands. Hence, they can be made in a way that is optimal for their specific applications, and you can wind-up with something a lot prettier and more elegant.

 

Foo, do you think this holds for the calculation Patek made when they decided to go in-house with the 5270G after using the Lemania-based CH27-70 movement for years (decades!) with their perpetual calendar chronographs? 

post #19369 of 48312

Nice shot sinclear, and nice watch too.

post #19370 of 48312
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Quote:
Originally Posted by rnguy001 View Post

saw this today at the Mall - thought it was pretty fancy. Sat well for being 44mm. The 2-dial layout, silver dial, and blued hands reminded me of the 5001-07 I was wearing. Overall I very much lusted over it. nod[1].gif

Didn't even bother me the saleswoman was trying to explain to me that Glashutte was German, and that automatic movements don't require batteries etc.

Pics from the web.


Man, there is something about blued hands on a steel watch. Really nice.

In deference to Apropos' sensibilities, I will refrain from suggesting that chicks probably dig this watch. [Hint -- It's a joke. nod[1].gif ]
post #19371 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post


I agree with you for the most part. "Inferior" is a relative term. The Port. Chrono is not a bad watch. However, I really do think it is a questionable value proposition. Its retail price is $7,900--two thousand dollars more than the retail price of a Pilot Chronograph on a leather strap. Heck, the Pilot Chronograph on a bracelet is $7,100--still $800 less than the Port Chrono. Yet, they all share essentially the same movement. To make matters worse, the least expensive "real" Portuguese (the Portuguese Handwound) is $8,900. In actual purchase dollars, that is only a ~$700 premium, and you get an in-house, full-sized movement. Plus, the Portuguese Handwound is arguably the most classic form of Portuguese currently available. The white dialed version with gold numerals is a near dead ringer for the Jubilee, but with applied numerals. Actually, now that I think of it, it's shocking how much of a premium people are still willing to pay for the Jubillee now that these are available new (and with the typical dealer discount).

You are right about the JLC chronograph ebauche--but, again, chronographs are really their own isolated world in the horological universe. Also, as time goes on, I am convinced there will be more and more pressure on companies like AP and VC to develop their own truly in-house chronographs. It's a matter of prestige, and now that others are doing it, they cannot continue using the excuse that available ebauches are good enough.
Generally, ebauches are the much cheaper route. After all, the development cost for the ebauche is spread amongst all the brands who adopt it and use it over many, many years. Also, the typical ebauche is made to be rugged, easy to assemble, and highly adaptable (for ease of installing complication modules). That's to say, they are made to accommodate the lowest pricing possible, not to be particularly elegant or refined.

In contrast, in-house movements must be newly developed and are not typically shared with other brands. Hence, they can be made in a way that is optimal for their specific applications, and you can wind-up with something a lot prettier and more elegant.

 

Glad I am on this forum, I'm learning by just reading through the posts that you guys made, thanks. Like you mentioned before, a watch is something valuable, I wouldn't want to purchase a watch knowing that a cheaper watch is using the same movements etc. 

 

By reading from what you posted, do you think it is actually better to purchase the Portuguese handwound rather than the chrono? 

post #19372 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flake View Post


OEM Omega black croc deployant.

Thanks; I think I will be getting this later in the year :)

post #19373 of 48312
Hey guys, looking for a recommendation on a new watch. Something sleek and classy enough for a wedding (brothers this summer) but can still be worn daily and look good with a pair of jeans. My price range is around 800-1k. I would also consider shopping used to get the best bang for the buck. Thanks smile.gif
post #19374 of 48312
Tudor Pelagos

post #19375 of 48312
Montblanc Star World-Time GMT Automatic

post #19376 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by jim_n View Post

Hey guys, looking for a recommendation on a new watch. Something sleek and classy enough for a wedding (brothers this summer) but can still be worn daily and look good with a pair of jeans. My price range is around 800-1k. I would also consider shopping used to get the best bang for the buck. Thanks smile.gif

This question is actually harder to answer than it might seem at first. If you buy new, In the US you're limited to department store type watches. Hamilton, Tissot, Mido, Oris, etc. All of these brands have some classic styles in their lines, But they will still have a generic appearance with stock movements. The US market Japanese made watches are even more boring.

The Japanese makers, particularly Seiko and Orient Star, seem to reserve the more classic designs to their home market. There are dealers who will sell these models overseas, but When they need servicing, you'll need to send them back to Japan for best results. The good news is that they will cost significantly less than your target price.

If I were in your position, I would look for vintage watches. A good example would be Omega watches from the 60s, Particularly in the Constellation and Seamaster sport lines. But then again for half again of what you're willing to spend, You could get a Rolex Datejust from the same period.
post #19377 of 48312

Mafoofan, Dino, apropos, et al:

 

Dropping tons of knowledge. Thanks for much to think about and ruminate on.

post #19378 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hayward View Post

This question is actually harder to answer than it might seem at first. If you buy new, In the US you're limited to department store type watches. Hamilton, Tissot, Mido, Oris, etc. All of these brands have some classic styles in their lines, But they will still have a generic appearance with stock movements. The US market Japanese made watches are even more boring.

The Japanese makers, particularly Seiko and Orient Star, seem to reserve the more classic designs to their home market. There are dealers who will sell these models overseas, but When they need servicing, you'll need to send them back to Japan for best results. The good news is that they will cost significantly less than your target price.

If I were in your position, I would look for vintage watches. A good example would be Omega watches from the 60s, Particularly in the Constellation and Seamaster sport lines. But then again for half again of what you're willing to spend, You could get a Rolex Datejust from the same period.

I don't see what's wrong with an entry level watch as a first watch... many Ferrari drivers probably owned a Ford or a Toyota once upon a time.

Also, agree about a vintage Omega - excellent suggestion and fairly easy to find, depending on where the OP lives.

I would love to know where you can get a Datejust in working condition for less than $500 from any period. Most of the older oyster date watches I've seen have been $2k +
post #19379 of 48312
I think he meant an extra $500 on top of the £1,000
post #19380 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hayward View Post

This question is actually harder to answer than it might seem at first. If you buy new, In the US you're limited to department store type watches. Hamilton, Tissot, Mido, Oris, etc. All of these brands have some classic styles in their lines, But they will still have a generic appearance with stock movements. The US market Japanese made watches are even more boring.

The Japanese makers, particularly Seiko and Orient Star, seem to reserve the more classic designs to their home market. There are dealers who will sell these models overseas, but When they need servicing, you'll need to send them back to Japan for best results. The good news is that they will cost significantly less than your target price.

If I were in your position, I would look for vintage watches. A good example would be Omega watches from the 60s, Particularly in the Constellation and Seamaster sport lines. But then again for half again of what you're willing to spend, You could get a Rolex Datejust from the same period.

Stowa comes in under that price range, but might be hard to source.
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Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › The Watch Appreciation Thread (Reviews and Photos of Men's Timepieces by Rolex, Patek Philippe, Breitling, JLC etc...)