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The Watch Appreciation Thread (Reviews and Photos of Men's Timepieces by Rolex, Patek Philippe, Breitling, JLC etc...) - Page 73  

post #1081 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by gdl203 View Post
Very cool. Enjoy it! Laco was one of the original manufacturer of the B-Uhr so they have a real claim on the design and are not jumping on the Big Pilot bandwagon like a lot of other brands.

Thanks! The heritage was part of the allure that I liked about the Laco. I hope to keep it for a long time, kind of my fisrt step into another costly hobby

By the way your Panerai looks stellar on that strap. I always enjoy your posts here.
post #1082 of 48312
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kali77 View Post
By the way your Panerai looks stellar on that strap. I always enjoy your posts here.

Thanks. I don't want to take credit for the strap idea or the gold hands... I just shamelessly tried to copy the design of what I (and other Paneristi) consider to be the best looking modern Panerai and the first special edition made by Vendome after they acquired Panerai: the platinum-cased PAM21




Mine is essentially a poorman's version of that grail watch
post #1083 of 48312
Recently purchased a lovely IWC Portuguese, but am having issues with shirt sleeves... What do others do with large watches? I wear a mixture of normal and french cuff shirts and find that the normal cuffs either are tight over the watch or are pushed back under the sleeve of my suit meaning I show no shirt.. Italian solution of watch over shirts cuff anyone? Other options Yours Wristy
post #1084 of 48312
Most Panerais I find tacky, but that is a very nice-looking Panerai. In fact, the Radiomir model seems to be the most attractive, I think. It seems closest to the old ones, which I recall were done by Rolex? As for the tight shirt issue, when I wear a tight-cuffed sweater, I wear it over the sleeve.
post #1085 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing View Post
Most Panerais I find tacky, but that is a very nice-looking Panerai. In fact, the Radiomir model seems to be the most attractive, I think. It seems closest to the old ones, which I recall were done by Rolex?

They used Rolex movements but I think that was the extent of the Rolex involvement.

The Radiomir is known as the the "Officer's Watch" and wasn't designed with the same utlilitarian intent as the models with the crown lock.
post #1086 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by m_wave View Post
Recently purchased a lovely IWC Portuguese, but am having issues with shirt sleeves...

What do others do with large watches? I wear a mixture of normal and french cuff shirts and find that the normal cuffs either are tight over the watch or are pushed back under the sleeve of my suit meaning I show no shirt..

Italian solution of watch over shirts cuff anyone? Other options

Yours Wristy

If having your shirts made with larger cuffs isn't an option, try using cuff links with a bigger link between ends or more give. Silk knots (which have elastic in the 'link' part) stretch apart a bit and work quite well for this purpose.
post #1087 of 48312
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by zippyh View Post
They used Rolex movements but I think that was the extent of the Rolex involvement.
Yes - case design and other details/innovation like the crown lock were Panerai's. Panerai was a navy/military instrument maker, not a watchmaker, so their heritage resides in the design of the watches and cases rather than the movements
post #1088 of 48312
And now you can finally buy their 1st ever manufacture/in-house movement. It's only in the Radomir 8 Day Reserve, right?
post #1089 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoCal2NYC View Post
And now you can finally buy their 1st ever manufacture/in-house movement. It's only in the Radomir 8 Day Reserve, right?

There's also a Luminor 1950 watch with the same movement; in fact, I think the Luminor came first.
post #1090 of 48312
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post
There's also a Luminor 1950 watch with the same movement; in fact, I think the Luminor came first.

Yes. More in-house PAMs coming this year but the first one was the Fiddy with 8-day 3-barrel manual movement. It's fugly IMO
post #1091 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by gdl203 View Post
Yes. More in-house PAMs coming this year but the first one was the Fiddy with 8-day 3-barrel manual movement. It's fugly IMO

They're all fugly if you ask me. The power-reserve indicator is hideous. If they were going to do a linear meter, why not have place the pointer inside the slot rather than hang out of it like a buck tooth?

I would be more interested in a time-only in-house movement from Panerai. After all, they've never been movement makers. Since they decided to go down that path it would make more sense to make something more utilitarian instead implementing 8-day power reserves and tourbillions. Such complications just seem at odds with the brand.
post #1092 of 48312
Thread Starter 
I don't disagree. It's really the PR indicator that kills the dials of all these in-house PAMs. It's too bad because the movements are actually quite interesting by themselves... 8 and 10 day manual, three barrels... Good work overall

At least the tourbillon is in the back of the watch, which I think is a good idea so it doesn't look like a cheap Canal St tourbillon
post #1093 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by zippyh View Post
They used Rolex movements but I think that was the extent of the Rolex involvement.

The Radiomir is known as the the "Officer's Watch" and wasn't designed with the same utlilitarian intent as the models with the crown lock.

This post reminded me that I always found curious the assertion that rolex used to make the movements for panerai. In my very limited knowledge of Rolex's history, I was under the impression that Rolex had until recently relied on 3rd parties to supply its movements. Rolex may have had close tie-ins with some of the movement sources but the suppliers remained officially independent. After doing a quick google search I found this thread. I don't know if this is the last word, but it appears to add more credible details of the relationship between the companies.

http://forums.timezone.com/pdf.php?th=573280
post #1094 of 48312
Quote:
Originally Posted by gdl203 View Post
I don't disagree. It's really the PR indicator that kills the dials of all these in-house PAMs. It's too bad because the movements are actually quite interesting by themselves... 8 and 10 day manual, three barrels... Good work overall

I'm no watchmaker, but the three barrel approach to achieving an 8-day power reserve seems kind of gimmicky to me. Theoretically, having multiple, smaller barrels mitigates isochronism issues, but this has already been done very effectively using only two barrels (see JLC) and the more barrels used, the more complicated the transmission device. Who needs an unnecessarily complicated watch movement?

I think IWC's solution, using only one barrel but stopping the release of the spring before it is full unwound, is the most mechanically elegant and simple. Of course, I'm a known IWC junkie, so take that for what it's worth.

Frankly, Panerai probably should have just stuck to using JLC's 8-day movement: it's been tested in the market, it's made extremely well, and JLC can probably provide superior quality for less money.
post #1095 of 48312
Received a few straps today so thought I would post some photos for fun. Dial up beware I am also hoping to get my hands on one of a few Ball watches I have been looking at, in the next couple of weeks





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Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › The Watch Appreciation Thread (Reviews and Photos of Men's Timepieces by Rolex, Patek Philippe, Breitling, JLC etc...)