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Formal Tuxedo Shirt: Single Cuffs vs. French Cuffs - Page 2

post #16 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grammaton Cleric View Post

A single cuffed formal shirt is called a link cuff.

It is called a single link cuff to differentiate it from the more common double link cuff, usually just called a double cuff or French cuff. Just "link cuff" doesn't necessarily mean it's a single cuff.
post #17 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Matt S View Post

It is called a single link cuff to differentiate it from the more common double link cuff, usually just called a double cuff or French cuff. Just "link cuff" doesn't necessarily mean it's a single cuff.

I'm sure this is a regional thing, or whatever.
post #18 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by ImTheGroom View Post

I'm sure this is a regional thing, or whatever.

"Single link cuffs" on these forums is most typical, but I've heard them called just "single cuffs" as well. Link cuffs can be either single or double. I've been communicating with people about clothes online for 8 years and I've never heard of "link cuff" used anywhere to only apply to single cuffs.
post #19 of 23
Single link cuffs are and have been always acceptable with a Tuxedo, Smoking, Dinner suit. If done well, they look better in most cases with a dinner suit than the Double version. A visit to a cloth museum will show you 20,30,40,50 and 60's example of turndown, marcella bibs and single cuffs examples. I have both, albeit the double cuff is my only pleated front (Charvet), and much prefer single cuffs. What is more, a version with attached collar and single link cuffs is virtually not existent RTW, so it is nice to have it bespoke.
Edited by marcodalondra - 3/7/14 at 12:41pm
post #20 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Matt S View Post

I've been communicating with people about clothes online for 8 years

I have quoted this to let you know that I'm impressed. Very impressed.
post #21 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grammaton Cleric View Post

I have quoted this to let you know that I'm impressed. Very impressed.

I don't appreciate the sarcasm. All I can say is that people in the US and in the UK don't call single cuffs simply "link cuffs." Any other people I've talked to outside of those two countries has been only online.
post #22 of 23
I think we are arguing over nothing at the moment. Everyone's pretty clear on what the others are taking about, so we should get back to talking cuffs of all linguistic traditions.
post #23 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by poorsod View Post

To summarize "The Suit" pg 174 : The options are detachable wing collar, stiff/pique bib, single link cuff vs. attached spread collar, soft pleated front and soft French cuffs.

This is good advice. To expand on it:

The wing collar shirt mentioned above is the only one that should take single link cuffs. This shirt also must take studs, if that wasn't a given. It's a white tie shirt and what was originally worn with black tie until soft shirts started to become popular in the 1930s. By the 1940s it wasn't as typical to wear this type of shirt with black tie. I find this type of shirt too fussy for black tie and a wing collar shirt to be more like costume from 80 years ago, but that's only my opinion.

The attached spread collar shirt with a pleated front and double (French) cuffs may take studs, or it may have regular buttons (which should always be mother-of-pearl if not something fancier) or a fly front. Double cuffs go best with the less dressy nature of the shirt, and those may be double link cuffs or cocktail cuffs (my preference, being a fan of James Bond and 1960s fashion).

An attached spread collar shirt may also have a pique bib, collar and cuffs, which should either take studs or have a fly front. Regular buttons don't suit the heightened formality of a pique bib.

A third option for the spread collar dress shirt can be to make the whole shirt out of a fancy white-on-white cloth. It's less traditional but an elegant alternative. This kind of shirt should take either buttons on the front or a fly front. I had a shirt like this made, and it's too dressy for anything other than black tie or a dark suit for dressy evening occasions. Yet another option is to get a silk shirt, and I'd apply the same conventions to that as the white-on-white shirt I just mentioned. Silk is very luxurious, though it wears warm.
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