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NFL 2016-17 Thread - Page 216

post #3226 of 4980
Quote:
Originally Posted by archibaldleach View Post

, sometimes things become a "priority" because a new law firm takes over and has a different view and suddenly one is lead to believe that coincidentally all of said firm's clients now think XYZ is a major concern.
Truth. smile.gif
post #3227 of 4980
Quote:
Originally Posted by archibaldleach View Post

Of course, sometimes things become a "priority" because a new law firm takes over and has a different view and suddenly one is lead to believe that coincidentally all of said firm's clients now think XYZ is a major concern.

Or in this case, a new commissioner and NFLPA president. The prior folks, Paul and Gene, basically worked hand in hand on a lot of issues. Roger and DeMaurice, not so much.
post #3228 of 4980
^ Yup.
post #3229 of 4980
Quote:
Originally Posted by archibaldleach View Post

I mostly agree with this (I think the evidence on Deflategate is very shaky but that's probably an agree to disagree thing). I think the issue is that once the league starts trying to regulate off the field conduct, the comparisons are inevitably going to be made. The league has basically done this to themselves. I mean, there may be some formula that says "beating your wife is worthy of an 8 game suspension, but we use some .25 or .50 multiplier since it doesn't directly affect the integrity of the game," but how the hell do you communicate that?

lawyerdad hit the nail on the head with the PR comment above. The punishments for various forms of criminal behavior are a reaction to public response/outcry. Punishments for incidents like this are because the incident is impacting the reputation of the league. If it were up to Goodell, he'd probably rather let the legal system handle the former while he handles the latter.

The fact that the players are so much in the public eye makes punishment in the NFL/other pro leagues a lot different than it would be for most of us. But harsher penalties for incidents related to the workplace vs those outside the workplace are not unusual. If Joe Schmo goes out and gets a DUI, is he getting fired? Probably not (unless he's a truck driver/pizza delivery guy/etc.). But most of us could say the wrong thing to the wrong person at our company and end up fired. Drunk driving is worse, but....
post #3230 of 4980
Suck it Brady!!

(Are they playing the Dolphins in one of those four games?)
post #3231 of 4980
Pitt, Buffalo, Jax, and Dallas are the first 4 games.
post #3232 of 4980
My friends who are Cowboys fans (yes, I have some; it's not something I'm proud of but I swear they're good people) are excited. If the suspension were to be overturned in federal court or a preliminary injunction were to delay its start, however, that may not be the news my friends are hoping for.
post #3233 of 4980
Pats will be fine. New handsome QB 2.1* will go like 3-1 or maybe 4-0 (yeah EDINA) still probably be a top AFC seed and rest of AFC will be Lolz per usual.


New handsome QB 2.1 will be then traded for assets to reload.





























*dont forget Drew Bledsoe
post #3234 of 4980
Quote:
Originally Posted by venividivicibj View Post

Ed, you have to admit destroying your phone is an interesting twist though.

Maybe. I would not be surprised if celebs do destroy their phones though.

The NFL has no evidence of wrongdoing and never considered that the Colts could have over-inflated the balls leading to the discrepancy (read the NY Times piece I posted if you haven't) and the Wells Report was deeply flawed.

But Brady is a cheat!
post #3235 of 4980
(His Facebook post from a few hours ago.)

Tom Brady
2 hrs ·
I am very disappointed by the NFL’s decision to uphold the 4 game suspension against me. I did nothing wrong, and no one in the Patriots organization did either.
Despite submitting to hours of testimony over the past 6 months, it is disappointing that the Commissioner upheld my suspension based upon a standard that it was “probable” that I was “generally aware” of misconduct. The fact is that neither I, nor any equipment person, did anything of which we have been accused. He dismissed my hours of testimony and it is disappointing that he found it unreliable.
I also disagree with yesterdays narrative surrounding my cellphone. I replaced my broken Samsung phone with a new iPhone 6 AFTER my attorneys made it clear to the NFL that my actual phone device would not be subjected to investigation under ANY circumstances. As a member of a union, I was under no obligation to set a new precedent going forward, nor was I made aware at any time during Mr. Wells investigation, that failing to subject my cell phone to investigation would result in ANY discipline.
Most importantly, I have never written, texted, emailed to anybody at anytime, anything related to football air pressure before this issue was raised at the AFC Championship game in January. To suggest that I destroyed a phone to avoid giving the NFL information it requested is completely wrong.
To try and reconcile the record and fully cooperate with the investigation after I was disciplined in May, we turned over detailed pages of cell phone records and all of the emails that Mr. Wells requested. We even contacted the phone company to see if there was any possible way we could retrieve any/all of the actual text messages from my old phone. In short, we exhausted every possibility to give the NFL everything we could and offered to go thru the identity for every text and phone call during the relevant time. Regardless, the NFL knows that Mr. Wells already had ALL relevant communications with Patriots personnel that either Mr. Wells saw or that I was questioned about in my appeal hearing. There is no “smoking gun” and this controversy is manufactured to distract from the fact they have zero evidence of wrongdoing.
I authorized the NFLPA to make a settlement offer to the NFL so that we could avoid going to court and put this inconsequential issue behind us as we move forward into this season. The discipline was upheld without any counter offer. I respect the Commissioners authority, but he also has to respect the CBA and my rights as a private citizen. I will not allow my unfair discipline to become a precedent for other NFL players without a fight.
Lastly, I am overwhelmed and humbled by the support of family, friends and our fans who have supported me since the false accusations were made after the AFC Championship game. I look forward to the opportunity to resume playing with my teammates and winning more games for the New England Patriots.
post #3236 of 4980
I know I'm a homer but considering how much legal scrutiny that statement would have had from the Brady camp to have such an unequivocal denial suggests he is in the clear. There's plenty of lawyers here who can probably comment on leaving some wiggle room in your statements but Brady didn't.
post #3237 of 4980
Quote:
Originally Posted by edinatlanta View Post

I know I'm a homer but considering how much legal scrutiny that statement would have had from the Brady camp to have such an unequivocal denial suggests he is in the clear. There's plenty of lawyers here who can probably comment on leaving some wiggle room in your statements but Brady didn't.

BS.

He talks about authorizing the NLPA to make an offer to the NFL to settle. There is nothing in the CBA that really "allows" that.
You really think that a pro athlete would NOT lie to protect themselves? Stop.
post #3238 of 4980
I hope he sues. Just to see what the NFL does/how they handle it
post #3239 of 4980
Quote:
Originally Posted by ter1413 View Post

BS.

He talks about authorizing the NLPA to make an offer to the NFL to settle. There is nothing in the CBA that really "allows" that.
You really think that a pro athlete would NOT lie to protect themselves? Stop.

Well, there's no evidence and you don't care for my opinion so:

Quote:
Considering that our impartiality was at least implicitly recognized by the N.F.L. in the past, we believe that our analysis of the evidence in Deflategate, in a study released Friday by the American Enterprise Institute, could help resolve this latest controversy.
...

Our study, written with our colleague Joseph Sullivan, examines the evidence and methodology of the Wells report and concludes that it is deeply flawed. (We have no financial stake in the outcome of Deflategate.)

The Wells report’s main finding is that the Patriots balls declined in pressure more than the Colts balls did in the first half of their game, and that the decline is highly statistically significant. For the sake of argument, let’s grant this finding for now. Even still, it alone does not prove misconduct. There are, after all, two possibilities. The first is that the Patriots balls declined too much. The second — overlooked by the Wells report — is that the Colts balls declined too little.

The latter possibility appears to be more likely. The Wells report notes the expected pressure for the footballs at halftime in the Patriots-Colts game, factoring in the decline in pressure to be expected when a ball, inflated in a warm room, has been moved to a cold outdoor field. If the Patriots deflated their balls, their pressure levels at halftime should have fallen below the expected level, while the Colts balls at halftime should have hovered around that level.

But when we analyzed the data provided in the Wells report, we found that the Patriots balls declined by about the expected amount, while the Colts balls declined by less. In fact, the pressure of the Colts balls was statistically significantly higher than expected. Contrary to the report, the significant difference between the changes in pressure of the two teams’ balls was not because the pressure of the Patriots balls was too low, but because that of the Colts balls was too high.
...

One of the gauges, as the report notes, records pressures that are higher than the other. If the official used that gauge to measure the Patriots balls (but not the Colts balls) pregame, then those balls may well have started out with too little air, which could explain a later appearance of intentional deflation. The report, however, does not consider that possibility.

Our recommendation? When the N.F.L. hears Mr. Brady’s appeal of his suspension later this month, it should proceed with the knowledge that the Wells report is unreliable.
post #3240 of 4980

The fact that it's probably unfair makes it so much better. Not everybody can be as moral, upright, and beyond reproach as Eli Manning, the greatest quarterback in the NFL. 

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