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The Ultimate Rug and Carpet Thread - Page 11

post #151 of 175
I see what you did there...
post #152 of 175
Over 800 vendors exhibit. There may be a dozen serious rug dealers. There dozens of other vendors that always have rugs.
post #153 of 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by pocketsquareguy View Post

Over 800 vendors exhibit. There may be a dozen serious rug dealers. There dozens of other vendors that always have rugs.

Who knew? I thought all the Iranian expats lived in Southern California. I am going to have to check that out next time I am in the area. Sound like a great environment for carpet buyers and a lousy one for sellers!
post #154 of 175

8762434655_3e89394475_z.jpg

 

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I bought this rug off eBay for £100, including shipping. Sorry these are the only photos I have for now as I am away from home. Seller said it was 100% wool, Persian form the 1970s. I chose it because it's the only one I could find with paisleys on it (the grey cat is named Paisley—the black one is named Argyle, but I doubt I'll find an argyle rug). It's a bit worn as you can see, and one side is more faded than the other.

 

I know nothing about rugs. Please give me your opinions.

post #155 of 175

File:清 郎世宁绘《清高宗乾隆帝朝服像》.jpg

 

It would be neat to make a reproduction of the Qianlong Emperor's carpet—or a pocket square with the carpet design—hmm...

post #156 of 175
If it has paisley designs my guess is that it would be from India and not Persian. But I am no rug expert. I only know about the rugs I own.
post #157 of 175

Wikipedia says paisley is both Indian and Persian.

post #158 of 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kent Wang View Post

Wikipedia says paisley is both Indian and Persian.

True the paisley design is classic Persian and Indian but in many years of buying vintage Persian rugs I can't recall seeing one rug with paisleys. The only paisley pattern rugs I recall seeing were woven in India in the 70's for import shops in the USA.

But, hey, all that matters is that you like the rug. If the condition is good you certainly got a great price.
post #159 of 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kent Wang View Post

8762434655_3e89394475_z.jpg
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
9011148335_b00b0e3eb3_z.jpg

9011157913_21cfc2af76_z.jpg
I bought this rug off eBay for £100, including shipping. Sorry these are the only photos I have for now as I am away from home. Seller said it was 100% wool, Persian form the 1970s. I chose it because it's the only one I could find with paisleys on it (the grey cat is named Paisley—the black one is named Argyle, but I doubt I'll find an argyle rug). It's a bit worn as you can see, and one side is more faded than the other.

I know nothing about rugs. Please give me your opinions.

First, let's see the back and the fringes. That rug does look like it has a lot of wear. My WAG based on the wear patterns is that it is actually cotton but I could easily be mistaken. If it is wool, it has been in a high traffic area for a long time. If the rug was hand-knotted, you can usually tell from a close examination of the fringes whether the base is cotton or wool.

As for paisley, the pattern originally comes from Northern India or, depending on how your view these things, Southern Pakistan. Paisley is not closely associated with any particular city or style of Iranian carpet making but it is used a lot in all kinds of Iranian art, including carpets. I think, however, it is more common in Indian carpets. I have also seen carpets woven in Turkey with paisley patterns.

Now tell me about the tea set. I quite like it. From the picture, I would guess it is sterling.
post #160 of 175

I still haven't had a chance to take more photos of my paisley rug, but you can see more of the art deco tea set. It's silver plate.

 

I'm seriously considering getting the Qianlong rug woven. Has anyone had a custom rug made? A quick search found this one-man shop, Jason Collingwood. He says "The warp is linen, used for it's strength and inelasticity. The weft is a commercial quality carpet wool (80% wool, 20% nylon), a yarn spun specifically for use on the floor." The 20% nylon does not sit well with me; would you find this acceptable?

 

Tassels or no?

post #161 of 175
Kent, a lot of silver plate is junk and looks it. But some of it is very nice and well constructed. Your tea set appears to be in that category. Is it period or a reproduction? But beautiful in any case.

There are a number of places where you can commission a carpet using traditional methods and materials. Personally, I would not get a traditional-looking carpet using linen and nylon as they are not traditional materials. You would be surprised at how hard-wearing a 100% wool carpet can be.

I would explore the possibility of getting someone in India or Turkey to make you a carpet. The only proviso is that I would make sure they are certified as not using child-labor. Admittedly, that's not something you would have to worry about with your source, I'm sure.
post #162 of 175
By the way, here is a story about child labor and rug weaving. You can find much more about it with a simple search on the subject.

http://www.goodweave.org/index.php?cid=125
post #163 of 175
A reminder to anyone in the Bay Area that this Sunday is the Alameda Flea market and an excellent opportunity to shop for rugs. There are good values to be had. Of course, some guys ask silly prices. There is something for everyones budget. I picked up a vintage prayer rug with dense weaving in good condition and with excellent color for only $35. It would probably have a price of $200+ in a store.


post #164 of 175
Can anyone offer their opinion on the authenticity of this Beni Ourain?

post #165 of 175
Thread Starter 
Are you sure that isn't a beach towel?
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