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What have you learned most from this board?

post #1 of 51
Thread Starter 
So, I'm just curious whether we learn from this board, and, if so, what we tend to learn most? I'm trying to put a "Top Ten" list of the best things I've learned from this board, of which I've been a member for about four months. (1) Jantzen Tailor -- I learned of the existence of Jantzen Tailor, which I consider to be the single most important thing I've learned here. I now have a collection of very nice dress shirts (or, at least they are being made right now) that actually fit me well. Incidentally, I stumbled across this board doing a google search for "dress shirts with smaller wrist sizes," because I was sick of my cuffs being too damn big. (2) Basics of suit construction -- I learned that, via the pinch test, you can tell a fused suit from a canvassed one; I learned that full canvas construction really is the first thing to look for in a suit purchase. (3) That with shoes, you get what you pay for -- I now know that finding a pair of $400 on sale for $185 is a much better purchase than finding a $150 pair on sale for $100. (4) The difference between quality and name -- I now know that Armani Collezione makes crap, and that therefore that my budding suit wardrobe is much better made than my uncles, who always prided himself on being the stylish one. (5) W.W. Chan -- Soon to be, perhaps, the maker of the majority of my great suits. (6) That rich people dress in poorly made/ill fitting clothes -- yes, A. Harris, I can now tell a fused suit just by looking at it. (7) Sales -- This board spreads sales info like wildfire. It has allowed me to dress 30% better for the same money. (8) How to shine shoes -- and that you should shine them regularly. Stupidly, I always thought shining shoes ruined them (like painting them). (9) That you should put as much effort into sportswear as you do tailored clothes -- though I think it is insane to buy jeans for $200, I now see the value in grabbing some PDCs for $65 as opposed to Gap jeans for $40; however, I still think that Banana Republic makes some great stuff for the money. (10) That you are better off buying good stuff in smaller quantities than bad stuff again and again -- enough said.
post #2 of 51
Quote:
(6) That rich people dress in poorly made/ill fitting clothes -- yes, A. Harris, I can now tell a fused suit just by looking at it.
Ok, I still haven't been able to do this (telling a suit is fused or not just by looking at it). Care to tell some tips?
post #3 of 51
Thread Starter 
3 things for me, and you must see them in combination. (1) Roll of lapel. If lapel looks like it is very limp and thin -- sort of like it could flap in the wind -- you are definitely looking at a fused suit. (2) If the suit is half canvas or well pressed, a fused suit could still have a decent lapel, at least good enough to fool the naked eye. If the lapel doesn't tip you off, then look at the chest. If it looks stiff in the chest, this is another tip off. A canvas suit will have a chest muscle like shape to it. It will have some "three dimensional nature" to it. A fused suit will look like a plate of armor. (3) Here's my big one -- look at the waist. If it "falls" at the waist such that the fabric drapes over the body, then this is the mark of a canvas suit. A fused suit is too stiff to fall in at the waist. Instead, it will "stand up on its own" a bit. You won't see that contouring in the waist (this doesn't have to do with the cut, it has to do with the drape). It's tough, but I'd guess that I can guess right over 80% of the time.
post #4 of 51
l have learnt that there are many nutcases who like expensive shoes too. l always wondered what types of people paid big money for suits and shoes. lf we told normal people that we paid over $1,000 for shoes, they would contact the mental assylum for us to be committed. Once; l invited my brother-in-law, sister and kids down to my holiday house. l got drunk and ended up telling Danny (bother in law) that l paid over $1,000 for the pair of shoes l was wearing. He was stunned and called me a d*ckhead.
post #5 of 51
I've learned how to buy great MTM shirts for forty bucks each and how to buy fantastic English shoes for less than four hundred. I've learned a lot about suit construction and the various cuts and styles.
post #6 of 51
I've learned that knowledge is expensive.   Truth be told, I agree with the things that Johnny posted, but what I really enjoy is the camaraderie that we have.  I feel very lucky to have found this board.  I have made trades with members when we both have pieces that are not perfect, just for the sake of getting pieces that we desire, and not being overly concerned about the cash side of the transaction.  I have had someone take time from their busy day to pick up a suit for me, because they found a good deal.  And I surely have benefited from the sharing of sales and information.   But probably the biggest key is that those who are very knowledgeable, share their knowledge and expertise freely and without any hint of condescention.  It is not often that someone can have an opinion torn apart, but with tact and thoughtful reasoning.  Odd as it may seem, that is a trait that I have been trying to bring to my professional life.
post #7 of 51
Quote:
l have learnt that there are many nutcases who like expensive shoes too. l always wondered what types of people paid big money for suits and shoes. lf we told normal people that we paid over $1,000 for shoes, they would contact the mental assylum for us to be committed. Once; l invited my brother-in-law, sister and kids down to my holiday house. l got drunk and ended up telling Danny (bother in law) that l paid over $1,000 for the pair of shoes l was wearing. He was stunned and called me a d*ckhead.
You know, I've never understood the visceral reaction that "normal" people have when they find out the cost of some better clothing. They take it as some sort of strange insult. We each have our own splurges and eccentricities; I have a friend who derides me for spending so much on shirts, but thinks nothing of dropping two grand on a fly-rod, of which he has several.
post #8 of 51
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We each have our own splurges and eccentricities; I have a friend who derides me for spending so much on shirts, but thinks nothing of dropping two grand on a fly-rod, of which he has several.
Yeah, and I've spent less on clothing than what some people spend on their computers. Anyways, if there's another thing I've learned on this board, it's that there is such a thing as too much of a good thing. Several board members offered the view that, although it's nice to own nice things, there are other arguably more worthwhile goals to attain. Of course, I am not a guy with $100k+ worth of investments and who is retiring next year.
post #9 of 51
I've learned that may times listening gives a greater return than asserting uneducated opinions. I've also learned an immense amount of information about construction and processes put in the crafting of the shirt on my back; well beyond what may have known originally. Most importantly, I found a knowledgeable and diverse community which drives me to improve my wardrobe and personae. thanks guys.
post #10 of 51
I've learned that I don't know as much as I though I did. As a shoe buyer/salesman/independent retailer, I had let myself slip a little over the years on some technical information as no 'typical' customers ask the kinds of questions I've read on these forums. However, I have been very impressed by the knowledge and interest here on the small details and have rededicated myself to those details to better serve my customers as well as for my own benefit. Thank You.
post #11 of 51
At the risk of sounding a bit "preachy," I've learned that there is a great forum where guys don't feel obligated to outdo, out-macho, out-spend, out-joke, out-cool, out-tough, or out-style each other, but can let all that go and share a common passion with courtesy and open minds, devoid of judgements. Whew. That said, I am really grateful to everyone on the board for their vast amount of knowledge in all areas of clothing: shoes, suits, shirts, belts, ties...even tie dimplers. (hope I'm not revealing too much of my vast ignorance, but I still don't know what one looks like) As others have already stated, the information on this board is invaluable for personal, social, and economic reasons.
post #12 of 51
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(TCN @ 28 June 2004, 04:43) We each have our own splurges and eccentricities; I have a friend who derides me for spending so much on shirts, but thinks nothing of dropping two grand on a fly-rod, of which he has several.
Yeah, and I've spent less on clothing than what some people spend on their computers. Anyways, if there's another thing I've learned on this board, it's that there is such a thing as too much of a good thing. Several board members offered the view that, although it's nice to own nice things, there are other arguably more worthwhile goals to attain. Of course, I am not a guy with $100k+ worth of investments and who is retiring next year.
I just tell them..."well, those pair of Lattanzis, Lobb's, etc. will outlast your BMW about ten times over" koji
post #13 of 51
Barring the non-clothes related associations that might occur on the forum (social, economic, etc...). The primary thing I have learned is how to tell a fused suit form a non-fused suit and where the fusing might be and what it entails to both fit and longevity. To me there is no more important thing that can be learned when purchasing sartorial items. Because, barring footwear, jackets / suits / overcoats are the most expensive sartorial item, thus one should know what one is purchasing. Secondary, there are many pieces of information I have learned, from sportswear, to causal, to white tie. There are really too many things to post, so lets just say that I enhanced my sartorial knowledge by at least 25% (with ease) since coming to the forum. Lastly, I have to give a nod to Andy's forum, without it, I would have never found this place. Jon. As well, I learned that there are more people my age that enjoy haberdashery as well. I also learned that discount codes are easier to find than I thought at first.
post #14 of 51
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I just tell them..."well, those pair of Lattanzis, Lobb's, etc. will outlast your BMW about ten times over" koji
But I want to see you do 0-60 in under 6 seconds with your Lobb's... JJF
post #15 of 51
I don't drive koji
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