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When you should go bespoke - Page 6

post #76 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by add911_11 View Post

At least I can assure you that my shape is very normal, unlike some in here. My side of argument is simple: if bespoke fits your RTW worse, your tailor is SHIT.

Thanks for the warm warning.

Well there's very good reasons why OTR can fit better, well sort of. First off when shopping you put something on and generally see if it works or not, if it doesn't you discard it until you find a cut that works, with bespoke it's got to be right in one shot.

Secondly OTR suits are made to fit a lot of people "ok" so those armholes are big for example. now if you put on a bespoke suit made for you and the armholes are a touch too close, you will feel uncomfortable and that will draw attention to the area.

Finally when getting something made for you, you will probably start to scrutinize the garment a whole lot more. If your looking for faults you will probably find them, because nothing's perfect. Have a big lunch? That immaculately fitted vest next week may be a tad tight. Had some coffee today? Your posture is different from when you come in and your tired. These are slight things that you may pick up on if your looking hard enough.

One of the joys of bespoke, (and I am my best customer) is the process. If your like oh I hate coming in for fittings and can't be bothered waiting a long time for something, then your missing a part of/not appreciating the experience, and those fittings and that time is actually what you have paid for in many respects.

Finally of course there is the prestige of having something made for you and you alone, imagine getting anything else made for you personally like say your car, your watch, your home, how good would that be?
post #77 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackhood View Post


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post #78 of 105

Bespoke - It is nice to have something made that fits to you as best as possible. But too bad our bodies change everyday. 

 

OTR - If you find a brand that makes clothing that fits you well on a consistent basis, then I'd rather go with that rather than spend the time and energy in trying to get something perfect.

 

It's all personal preference.

post #79 of 105
I guess what David is saying is that the journey is part of the reason why someone would want to do bespoke.

On a personal note, I would also like to go bespoke eventually to support the hard work of the the few artisans left. One day such things might be no more, and my bespoke will be a little piece of traditional history.

Sensationalizing, I know, but I'm an artist. Can't help it...
post #80 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by JubeiSpiegel View Post

I guess what David is saying is that the journey is part of the reason why someone would want to do bespoke.

On a personal note, I would also like to go bespoke eventually to support the hard work of the the few artisans left. One day such things might be no more, and my bespoke will be a little piece of traditional history.

Sensationalizing, I know, but I'm an artist. Can't help it...

A lot of people are always saying there are few bespoke accessory, clothing and shoemakers (often referred to as artisans by members of SF and members of other fashion and style message boards) left. In England and Italy, that couldn't be farther from the truth. The market for the bespoke items I just mentioned always has been and always will be huge in these two European countries equally. England and Italy are equally the future of bespoke accessories, clothing and shoes. All of this is simply the way it is (and always will be).

In most other countries throughout the world (particularly Australia, New Zealand and the United States of America), yes, there are truly few of these artisans left as the market is there by a small amount.
post #81 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Reeves View Post

Well there's very good reasons why OTR can fit better, well sort of.

I am sure such will not happen in your operation.
post #82 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by OxxfordSJLINY View Post

A lot of people are always saying there are few bespoke accessory, clothing and shoemakers (often referred to as artisans by members of SF and members of other fashion and style message boards) left. In England and Italy, that couldn't be farther from the truth. The market for the bespoke items I just mentioned always has been and always will be huge in these two European countries equally. England and Italy are equally the future of bespoke accessories, clothing and shoes. All of this is simply the way it is (and always will be).

In most other countries throughout the world (particularly Australia, New Zealand and the United States of America), yes, there are truly few of these artisans left as the market is there by a small amount.



Even in England and Italy where there may be more of a demand for bespoke, fewer and fewer native born young men and women are interested in taking up custom tailoring as a profession.
If anything, future custom tailors will come from Asia and other third world areas where young people still consider cutting and sewing a reasonable trade.
post #83 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by Millerp View Post

Even in England and Italy where there may be more of a demand for bespoke, fewer and fewer native born young men and women are interested in taking up custom tailoring as a profession.
If anything, future custom tailors will come from Asia and other third world areas where young people still consider cutting and sewing a reasonable trade.

I believe it is the other way round, there are growing interests in tailoring professions amongst the younger generations. This is especially true in England.
In the next generation, it will be a great difficulty to find any competent young Asian tailors, with the adverse stigma of being a tailor in Asia. Especially in Hong Kong.
post #84 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by add911_11 View Post

I believe it is the other way round, there are growing interests in tailoring professions amongst the younger generations. This is especially true in England.
In the next generation, it will be a great difficulty to find any competent young Asian tailors, with the adverse stigma of being a tailor in Asia. Especially in Hong Kong.

What you said about growing interests in tailoring professions amongst the younger generation is just as true in Italy as it is in England (according to research that I have done).

Other than Japan (where there are just as much in the way of growing interests in tailoring professions amongst the younger generation as there are in England and Italy), I completely agree with you about Asia, especially Hong Kong. Many times, you and I and many other people on SF and the other fashion and style message boards have said the same things that you and I are saying.

You and I (and many other people at the places that I spoke of above) are 100% correct, about everything we all said, add911_11. You and I (and many other people) don't have to merely believe this. According to reserach I (and, apparently, you and many other people at the places that I spoke of above) have done many times, it is fact.
Edited by OxxfordSJLINY - 8/1/13 at 9:21am
post #85 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by add911_11 View Post


I believe it is the other way round, there are growing interests in tailoring professions amongst the younger generations. This is especially true in England.
In the next generation, it will be a great difficulty to find any competent young Asian tailors, with the adverse stigma of being a tailor in Asia. Especially in Hong Kong.

...but...but we Asian can do anything better than the barbarians!

Just kidding. I get that in countries like China, tailors may be looked down upon because their parents want them to become doctors, lawyers, etc. I am not Chinese so correct me if I am wrong. But in countries like Korea, I see that kids are pursuing what they want to do. I have a cousin who makes shoes (unfortunately girl shoes). She went to some school in France and started designing and making her own shoes...to sell, and other friends who are in the tailor business.

post #86 of 105
At least in Naples, the growing interest in tailoring among young people is directly related the complete nosedive of every other industry.

It's important to keep track of what period you're comparing to. If you're comparing SR now to, say, 20 years ago, they're probably producing more suits now. Compared to interwar years, not even close, and they probably will never again get close to what they were producing then.

Also consider that there used to be much more to the bespoke world than just London and Naples. In cities like New York and LA, or DC, even towns like StL, you used to have plenty of good local options. No longer.
post #87 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by unbelragazzo View Post

At least in Naples, the growing interest in tailoring among young people is directly related the complete nosedive of every other industry.

It's important to keep track of what period you're comparing to. If you're comparing SR now to, say, 20 years ago, they're probably producing more suits now. Compared to interwar years, not even close, and they probably will never again get close to what they were producing then.

Also consider that there used to be much more to the bespoke world than just London and Naples. In cities like New York and LA, or DC, even towns like StL, you used to have plenty of good local options. No longer.

Hello there fellow Washingtonian. So where's a good tailor in our area? I am interested in some bespoke since everybody here thinks that I am nuts for paying full retail on everything I buy.

post #88 of 105
William Field in Georgetown is very good in my opinion. Check out the interview with him in my signature, and go by and have a chat with him. He's a great guy and will be happy to talk to you. Call first to make an appt. He'll be on vacation for a couple wks starting Aug 12 though.
post #89 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by unbelragazzo View Post

William Field in Georgetown is very good in my opinion. Check out the interview with him in my signature, and go by and have a chat with him. He's a great guy and will be happy to talk to you. Call first to make an appt. He'll be on vacation for a couple wks starting Aug 12 though.

Thanks!

post #90 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by unbelragazzo View Post

At least in Naples, the growing interest in tailoring among young people is directly related the complete nosedive of every other industry.

In Naples and all other cities it Italy (among them, Florence, Milan and Rome), each as much as Naples, the growing interest in tailoring among young people is 1/2 related to the complete nosedive of every other industry (the other 1/2 is to keep up with extremely strong demand). A lot of people on SF and the other fashion and styles message boards always talk about Naples but often ignore all other Italian cities (even Florence, Milan and Rome) when it comes to Italian bespoke accessory, clothing and shoe making.
Quote:
Originally Posted by unbelragazzo View Post

It's important to keep track of what period you're comparing to. If you're comparing SR now to, say, 20 years ago, they're probably producing more suits now. Compared to interwar years, not even close, and they probably will never again get close to what they were producing then. Also consider that there used to be much more to the bespoke world than just London and Naples. In cities like New York and LA, or DC, even towns like StL, you used to have plenty of good local options. No longer.

I agree with you about Savile Row tailors' production now to interwar years and the minimal local options for good bespoke in NYC, LA, DC and StL, you are spot on with all of that, unbelragazzo. However, bespoke accessory clothing and shoe makers throughout Italy have the same production as they have always had (and probably always will have). A few of them (Ambrosi, Liverano & Liverano, Panico, Pirozzi, Solito and one in Milan that I forget the name of) actually have (and will always have) higher production than ever before, which is why they are traveling the world two months out of the whole year each year (which they just started doing in the last 2 to 5 years). Again, you (like many other people people on SF and the other fashion and styles message boards) are forgetting that in each city in Italy (especially Florence, Milan and Rome) other than Naples, just as much as Naples and London in England that have plenty of god local options for all bespoke accessories, clothing and shoes.
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