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Hollande's and Akihito's suits: a comparison - Page 2

post #16 of 27
Despite the consensus that Hollande is a "schlub" when it comes to
style, he always seems to get the girl(s), at least those high achieving
attractive power-women who are universially admired. As Henry Kissenger said,
"Power is the great aphrodisiac". Or, it could be that M. Le President has an
anatomical atvantage.

http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=schlub
Edited by comrade - 2/11/14 at 9:00pm
post #17 of 27
Always found it incredible that Hirohito (his father) remained the head of state for Japan after the war. Unconditional surrender, but still

He did have a good tailor.

reagan-hirohito.jpg
post #18 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrd617 View Post

Always found it incredible that Hirohito (his father) remained the head of state for Japan after the war. Unconditional surrender, but still

 

As an aside, the one thing that was learned from the results of the post-WW1 settlement is that humiliating your defeated enemy (or even producing the public perception of humiliation) is a recipe for future repercussions. The US wasn't being 'generous' with either Japan or Germany after the war, it was being entirely self-interested and realistic about what kinds of nations it was trying to rebuild and why. Removing Hirohito completely would have immediately sowed the seeds of a much larger and more persistent far-right nationalism in Japan than now exists (and it's bad enough) and made it very difficult to the USA to use Japan as its base of operations in Asia (which it still is to this day, rightly or wrongly). 

post #19 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by FlyingMonkey View Post

Removing Hirohito completely

I didn't mean remove completely.

I meant I find it strange to see old photographs of him being received as the Japanese head of state by postwar US presidents. (Some of who served in the pacific theater). They all look like they're biting their tongue.

Anyways, he had a good tailor. biggrin.gif So does his son.
post #20 of 27
Thread Starter 

The Gathering Storm, Churchill's memoirs of the Second World War (p. 10), has a good explanation of why the Allies kept the emperor, by way of the cautionary example of Germany after the First World War.

 

"Wise policy would have crowned and fortified the Weimar Republic with a constitutional sovereign in the person of an infant grandson of the Kaiser, under a Council of Regency.  Instead, a gaping void was opened in the national life of the German people.  All the strong elements, military and feudal, which might have rallied to a constitutional monarchy and for its sake respected and sustained the new democratic and Parliamentary processes were for a time being unhinged.  The Weimar Republic, with all its liberal trappings and blessings, was regarded as an imposition of the enemy. It could not hold the loyalties or imaginations of the German people."

 

Interestingly, Churchill ends almost every sentence of this passage with a prepositional phrase beginning with "of."  "Of the German people, of the enemy."  He borrows this structure from Edward Gibbon, as Churchill himself noted.  It helps to give weight and finality to the end of his sentences.  Note too that Churchill almost always chooses concrete, action verbs: crowned, fortified, opened, rallied, respected.  It makes the sentences more active and their imagery more vivid.  


Edited by CrimsonSox - 2/12/14 at 12:14am
post #21 of 27
I'm glad this thread has reared its head; it contains a lesson that is so rarely voiced - that great tailoring isn't just about fit but proportion. A good fit might be close but not tight, but good proportion has so much more impact on the overall aesthetic and explains why good bespoke is that much more expensive.

A Master Tailor can rarely cut straighter, sew faster or press more firmly than one with 5, 10 or 15 years training, but he understands how the narrowness of the sleeve and the spacing of the buttons relates to the rest of the garment. It also shows how troublesome it can be to use online MTM services.
post #22 of 27
The emperor's clothes are just fine.
post #23 of 27
The point of this thread is that they are more than fine, they are perfect for his frame.
post #24 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by CrimsonSox View Post

What's surprising is that the fuller trousers actually look more slimming.

While they definitely look better than the communist's pants, don't count out that the hereditary ruler's slimness is the main thing that is more slimming.

A more appropriate test would be a comparison of wide and thin pants on each, as we now have on Hollande. Check mark. But I think pants that were a bit slimmer, on supreme being, would make him look slimmer than his wide pants. Better, maybe not (matter of taste), but slimmer, probably.

Frankly, I wouldn't be surprised if his clothes are meant to conceal a very skinny/meek physique.

Anyway without examples and diagrams and shit, tough to explain and judge.
post #25 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackhood View Post

The point of this thread is that they are more than fine, they are perfect for his frame.

Yes, I agree, I was just making a word play on The Emperor's Clothes paradigm. (Is paradigm the right word there? Hmmmm.)
post #26 of 27
Apologies, I totally missed the refference, my bad!

(I think you mean parable, rather than paradigm)
post #27 of 27
Ah, yes. Knew it was some kind of para!
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