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Frederick Scholte - Page 5

post #61 of 86
...and you are right about the weskit.

Writes Eric Musgrave: "The suit jacket was made by Scholte of London, while the trousers, with zipped fly, were tailored by Harris of New York. The matching waistcoat was made by Hawes and Curtis, as were the two pique waistcoats. Scholte made the green corduroy version. Who else but a menswear obsessive would involve three tailors on different sides of the Atlantic for an outfit?"
post #62 of 86
I saw one of the DoW double breasted jacket's and his paper pattern cut by scholte at the FIT 1930's Fashions exhibit. Was surprised what a small man he was.
post #63 of 86
Thread Starter 

A review of London tailors and shirtmakers, and advice for the bespoke customer, from the New Yorker, 1930. Tailoring firms in that era had much larger staffs, making possible astonishingly quick turnaround times: only three weeks for bespoke shoes and two weeks for your first suit with a tailor, including four fittings. Then there's a fifth fitting after you've worn the suit for a week for final adjustments.  

 

Scholte appears, though misspelled as his name often is in articles as "Sholte."  Anderson & Sheppard and Davies & Sons are also named as among the best in London. Suits at the best firms were 17.17 pounds, or only $1,695 in today's dollars.

 

Quote:

New Yorker, June 14, 1930

As to Men: Made in England

 

The first thing to decide is whether you really want an English suit or would prefer an American suit with a London label. If the latter is the case, it will be wiser to do your shopping here in New York, because you can’t get a good American suit in England.

 

Each of the important London tailors has developed a particular kind of cut that he thinks is a little better than anyone else’s. The best of them refuse to alter their style materially, and if you are foolhardy enough to ask them to copy another tailor, they are apt to suggest that you go to your old favorite in future. They are quite right, and you’ll find that a tailor who allows you to bully him will usually turn out a suit that is neither American nor English, but an amorphous combination of both.

 

Go to the best firm you can find which makes the kind of suit you want. It is false economy to patronize one of those inexpensive tailors you are always hearing about. Some Englishmen do and manage to be very well dressed; but they know exactly what they want, and don’t care how long it takes to describe it to the cutter. The best tailors charge about 17 guineas for a lounge suit; the others are two or three guineas cheaper, but the time you waste makes the savings hardly worth your while, and generally the suit you get is obviously second-rate.

 

Choose your fabrics carefully. You will find plenty of unattractive patterns even in the best shops. Remember that materials suitable for England, where steam heat is still a novelty, are often too heavy for New York. A medium-weight worsted is the best choice for a lounge suit; it holds its shape indefinitely and the firm texture permits fine tailoring. Plain fabrics, or those with inconspicuous patterns, are the smartest.

 

Allow your tailor all the time he needs to do his work properly, and let him give you as many fittings as he wishes. For your first suit, from ten days to two weeks, with three or four fittings, Then you are supposed to wear it for a week or so, and bring it back for refitting, to allow the tailor to remedy the small defects that usually appear.

 

Here is a list of some of the best tailors. It may help you find the one you want:

 

Davies & Sons, 19 Hanover Street; Poole, 37 Savile Row; and Hogg & Sons, 8 Hanover Square, are all conservative firms that know how to transform stoutness into dignity. These have many American businessmen on their books.

 

Anderson & Sheppard, 30 Savile Row, and Lesley & Roberts, 16 George Street, Hanover Square, are also conservative, but they are particularly good for the tall, spare military type of man. Their fabrics are unusual because each shop has specially woven patterns. Both manage to achieve squared shoulders with the minimum of padding.

 

Pleydell & Smith, 12 Cork Street, and Kilgour & French, 33A Dover Street, are a little more extreme. The former has a great many young American customers who want suits that are unquestionably British. Both firms make jackets with noticeably broad shoulders and narrow hips; and both advocate short double-breasted waistcoats with very wide curved lapels; these, of course, are to be worn with single-breasted jackets.

 

F.P. Sholte, 7 Savile Row, dresses many English actors. Hawes & Curtis, 53 Jermyn Street, well known shirtmakers, also make suits and overcoats; Jack Buchanan’s evening clothes, which are made here, will give you an idea of what to expect.

 

H. Huntsmen & Son, 11 Savile Row, turn out excellent riding clothes, and Tautz & Co., 12 Grafton Street, are famous makers of breeches.

 

Among the shirtmakers, Hawes & Curtis are known for having introduced the backless evening waistcoat. This firm also was one of the first to devise a starched bosom that does not bulge. T.M. Lewin, 39 Panton Street, makes evening shirts with starched bosoms and cuffs and bodies of handkerchief linen. Budd, 4 Piccadilly Arcade, is the place to go for evening ties in unusual shapes and materials. H. Ludlam & Co., 37 Albermarle Street, and Hodgkinson, 63 Jermyn Street, are good conservative shops where the salesmen have time to help you design the kind of shirt and collar that will suit you best. Beale & Inman, 131 Bond Street, and Washington Tremlett, 41 Conduit Street, are rather expensive but very good.

 

Collett & Levy, 84 Jermyn Street, is a place to know about if you are in a hurry. The ready-to–wear dress shirts and collars here are excellent, and minor alterations can be made quickly if you ask for them.

 

It takes about three weeks to have a pair of shoes made. If you want two pairs, you’ll have to have an extra pair of lasts, unless you want to wait another three weeks. Faulkner & Son, 51 South Molton Street, have a branch at 51 East Forty-second Street, which is convenient for customers in this city, in case anything goes wrong or they want to have their shoes repaired. Other good bootmakers are Peal, 487 Oxford Street; Allan McAfee, 38 Dover Street; R. Thomas & Sons, 5 St. James’ Street; and Hoby & Gullick,1 Ryder Street.

 

The bowlers of Lock & Co., 6 St. James’ Street, are unique. The bulging crown and hairy finish are seldom imitated. These hats are the favorite of English hunting men; the lives of many of them have been saved by the extremely hard crowns. In fact the crowns are so hard that the only way to get a perfect fit is to have one made for you. Lock hats seem to suit men with long narrow heads best. The hats made by Scotts, 1 Old Bond Street, and Herbert Johnson, 38 New Bond Street, have sloping crowns that are often more becoming to men with broad heads.

 

No doubt you know that several of the shops I’ve listed have representatives or branches in New York. Other firms, such as Bernard Weatherill, are so well known here that they can be considered as belonging to New York as much as to London now. – G. McC.


Edited by CrimsonSox - 3/17/14 at 11:35am
post #64 of 86
Great article - thanks for posting.

Never knew that Lesley & Roberts (now owned by Welsh & Jefferies) was also once considered a 'soft' tailor.
post #65 of 86
Thread Starter 

It's very rare to find descriptions and reviews of Scholte's tailoring from the time he was active.  The following article from the New York Herald Tribune, October 20, 1934, compares a Scholte tailcoat and dinner jacket on the left with a more conservative tailor on the right. The Scholte models have wider shoulders and trimmer waists in the jackets, as well as deeper pleats in the trousers.  I've included the accompanying text on the bottom.

 

 

 

 

 

Accompanying text:

 

post #66 of 86
Very cool!
post #67 of 86
Nice finds, CS.

RJE posted a similar comparison here once.

http://bit.ly/1oXAWIR



post #68 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by CrimsonSox View Post

It's very rare to find descriptions and reviews of Scholte's tailoring from the time he was active.  The following article from the New York Herald Tribune, October 20, 1934, compares a Scholte tailcoat and dinner jacket on the left with a more conservative tailor on the right. The Scholte models have wider shoulders and trimmer waists in the jackets, as well as deeper pleats in the trousers.  I've included the accompanying text on the bottom.




Thanks for the write up. Interestingly the tailcoat Steed made for me has a voluminous chest and has a somewhat rounded in appearance. The lapels are not angled as the Scholte nor are the fronts as dramatically cut away. If you had only made this post 1 year ago, I might have asked them if they could copy the Scholte!
post #69 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by poorsod View Post

Thanks for the write up. Interestingly the tailcoat Steed made for me has a voluminous chest and has a somewhat rounded in appearance. The lapels are not angled as the Scholte nor are the fronts as dramatically cut away. If you had only made this post 1 year ago, I might have asked them if they could copy the Scholte!

You could have refer to these wide available Scholte for the DoW examples:


post #70 of 86
Thread Starter 

It would be interesting to see a picture of your tailcoat if you have the opportunity Poorsod.  I love Edwin DeBoise's work at Steed.  And it's the rare elegant gentleman who owns a tailcoat!

post #71 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by marcodalondra View Post

You could have refer to these wide available Scholte for the DoW examples:

I have this picture saved but it was the description of the Scholte cut vs the conservative cut in the article that I noticed the differences.



Quote:
Originally Posted by CrimsonSox View Post

It would be interesting to see a picture of your tailcoat if you have the opportunity Poorsod.  I love Edwin DeBoise's work at Steed.  And it's the rare elegant gentleman who owns a tailcoat!

I only have party pictures of the tailcoat - ie bad lighting and poor perspective. Currently, the pants are at the tailors or adjustment.
post #72 of 86
Interesting on the simon vs. slew comparison as slews is an A&S expat and crompton's is a Poole.
post #73 of 86
IMO the drape style DB is far superior.
post #74 of 86
I'd be cautious of putting too much stock in a direct comparison of Simon's clothes. Despite the comparative nature of his blog, the clothes are made not to reflect the tailor's typical house style but built to Simon's rather specific tastes. For example, he has very sloped shoulders but doesn't like shoulder padding or artificial anatomical correction. That alone can dramatically affect the overall presentation of the resulting garments, and is a taste much more in the Italian tradition than the English. The result is tailoring that is very personalized, as bespoke should be, but less than ideal as a salesman's sample.

As illustration of the limitations of these artificial comparisons, that Poole is in a very lightweight cloth, unpressesed, being juxtaposed directly against a suit that naturally drapes much better and didn't just come out of a box. And both being made for and worn by two very different body types.
post #75 of 86

What about the lack of front darts in many Scholte coats?

I have read that in his coats were curved slanted darts.

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