or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Is it possible to look good buying cheap clothing?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Is it possible to look good buying cheap clothing? - Page 5

post #61 of 120
OP, if you're still reading this disaster of a thread, check out discounting websites like Sierra Trading Post and the like. You can often up the quality you get for the money and they tend to have good return policies if something doesn't fit right.
post #62 of 120

 It's black and white.

 

 

 You either look good or you don't.

post #63 of 120

The O.P asked for help, on building a wardrobe on the cheap.  and i offered help.

this is not a forum for being disparaging. no matter how much so some might want to be. facepalm.gif

they want it to be about vest's? give them vests. 

 

i hope the O.P takes my advice on how to get good clothes for less. Thrifting,trading with members,ebay.etc. glad for him to have a new job.   

some people need to seriously look at how classic menswear is evolving. designers don't make the same stuff every year. times are changing.

SW&D ?   i'm not LIL' somethin, wheezy, gold chainzzz. etc. or a hipster.  

 

many members understand that CM is not stuck in the 1940's.  

welcome to the future of CM,  it's all Loro Piana / flannel suits and air force ones. - with bold colors, hats (like bowlers or derby's),textures, and unique jewelery.

classic. refreshed. 

 

"Stay in the dark, but do not judge or resent, for i am in the light of day. Dancin' in my suit and sneakers"

post #64 of 120

willing to send the O.P some ties to get him started. pm sent.satisfied.gif

post #65 of 120

Never buy a "cheap" item. Rather buy a quality jacket, pair of shoes, etc at a discounted price.  Some of the suggested ways already mention are great! Bottom line you have to find yourself. Meaning find your style, know what it is, then begin the search for those hidden treasures! This may take some trail and error. It's easy to be fly with unlimited funds but it takes skill with a budget.  

post #66 of 120

size38R:

 

Dude... this is the internet. 2/3rds of the internet is about disparaging stuff. You're not exactly presenting a hard target here, since you're presenting a lot of stuff that's neither aesthetically good or particularly practical.

 

It's like a freshman trying to write free verse. Sure, it doesn't have to rhyme. It doesn't have to follow any rules. But if you're hanging out with a bunch of people who write sonnets (ie, people whose taste tends towards the rule-bound), then you're not going to get a lot of love for your free verse unless it's exceptionally good, and it works in a way that appeals to the tastes of the sonnet-writers. The "rule-breaking" examples you're posting here don't really exist on the same aesthetic planet as the stuff people on here like, and just don't work to my eye.

 

I copied down this quote from Yves Saint-Laurent's introduction to a book on his work that was published sometime in the '80s. I think it describes what interests me about classic menswear, and I think it might capture the ethos that you're coming into conflict with here. I'll probably sig it, actually:

 

"So, I am a classicist. I am fond of discipline. I find men's clothing fascinating because sometime between, say, 1930 and 1936, a handful of basic shapes were created and still prevail as a sort of scale of expression, with which every man can project his own personality and his own dignity."

 

Now, obviously, he was writing a little before the sort of radical, high-fashion men's stuff that has come along since then, but I think it's still a reasonable summation of the way people think on this particular board.

 

Also, I'll have no part of bowler hats and Air Force Ones, since although both are perfectly nice, neither would look at all right with what I wear neck to ankles in terms of proportion.

post #67 of 120

That's a great quote, and true to this day.adhering to his belief, people may still adapt and interpret the shapes as they deem fit. as long as they do, it's CM.

 

 

The Style Q:  so correct. 

post #68 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by size 38R View Post

That's a great quote, and true to this day.adhering to his belief, people may still adapt and interpret the shapes as they deem fit. as long as they do, it's CM.

 

 

The Style Q:  so correct. 


Right, but I find the first part as important as the second -- the classicism and discipline. I think this is an environment where the prevailing interpretation of classic tailored clothing is very classical and very disciplined. Some of what you posted is a little outside the realm of that stuff. It's more like totally new forms with cues from classic tailoring integrated.

 

I'm still not a big fan of tailored vest without jacket. I feel like I've seen it done about as well as it can be done (your post of yourself doing it falls into that category), and it never looks as good as either a jacket or a shirt on its own does. There's something about that silk back out on the street that I can't get behind, but vests with backs made from the same cloth as the front don't quite look right to me. A sweater vest without jacket wouldn't bug me, but then again, what would the point be? The chief advantage to a sweater vest is that it's easier to wear under a jacket than a sweater with sleeves.

 

I have a vestless wardrobe, and that doesn't bother me too much. If I weren't thrifting nearly everything, I'd try to only buy vested suits. I don't think I'd ever put on just a vest with no jacket and call it a day, but a non-matching vest with a jacket or suit can look great. Similarly, if I had a three-piece suit, I'd be very willing to remove the jacket, but I wouldn't want to go out without it.

post #69 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by size 38R View Post




Goodness, that looks terrible.
post #70 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Upward View Post

Would it look bad to dress for a new job everyday wearing the following?

 

5 white dress shirts from Nordstrom rack (the thin cotton Nordstrom brand that sells for $25)

5 black chino's from Nordstrom rack (flat front cotton pants $25)

 

How bad would that look?

 

Is there any better option for less than $400?

 

The other option is to buy

 

2 white dress shirts from Brook Brothers ($98 each)

2 wool dress pants from Nordstrom ($99 each)

 

That would be $100 more than above and it would be reworn twice a week.

 

What would be better for the upward professional?


This is the kind of post on SF that will always demonstrate the different sets of opinions on this forum between purist and practical.

 

In your case, if you're contemplating a 2 + 2 wardrobe, you're in the practical world. No matter how nice you'd like to dress, you're going to buy inexpensive clothes. You can look great in well tailored, well chosen, inexpensive brands of clothing. 2 pants and 2 shirts really isn't a practical solution and it sounds like you don't have anything else acceptable for work. It would be helpful to know where you are (cold, hot, etc), what type of work (Law? Investment Banking? Government? or a high tech company where hanes t-shirts are the uniform?). Also would help to know if standard sizes are a fit for you or if you need something custom? For example, Natty Shirts will make shirts to your size sometimes for $20 each. Admittedly not the finest fabrics, but OK if the fit is good.

 

If you check Joseph A. Bank online clearance right now, you can get an all-cotton dress shirt for between $15 and $25 on their clearance items that ends tomorrow. how about wrinkle resistant cotton twill slacks? $12. Wool Pants for $40 in a bunch of colors. For where you are from a budget perspective, it will be hard to do better than these prices. 99% of the general population will never notice that your shirts aren't made from sea island cotton with hand-attached sleeves and collars. Lots of folks on the forum hate JAB, as its primarily a marketing company, but at these prices, if they have your size, you will have serviceable clothes while you get your feet under you.

 

http://www.josbank.com/menswear/shop/Product_11001_10050_401834

http://www.josbank.com/menswear/shop/Product_11001_10050_101509

http://www.josbank.com/menswear/shop/Product_11001_10050_349920

 

If the fit is good, you're properly cleaned and pressed, you'll be fine with inexpensive clothes. You can buy nicer stuff later.

 

Case in point. I just paid $1500 to have a suit made. I like it a lot. My brother got a suit off Amazon, 100% wool, for $100 even. He spent about $50 on alterations and he looks like a million bucks. I've just come to understand that due to fit issues, It will always cost me more to look well-fitted than he will have to pay, because he has no fit issues and a standard 42R fits him very well.

 

Yes, you can look great in inexpensive clothes.

post #71 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by becnal View Post

Goodness, that looks terrible.

It really does. On so, so many levels.
post #72 of 120
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jebarne View Post


This is the kind of post on SF that will always demonstrate the different sets of opinions on this forum between purist and practical.

 

In your case, if you're contemplating a 2 + 2 wardrobe, you're in the practical world. No matter how nice you'd like to dress, you're going to buy inexpensive clothes. You can look great in well tailored, well chosen, inexpensive brands of clothing. 2 pants and 2 shirts really isn't a practical solution and it sounds like you don't have anything else acceptable for work. It would be helpful to know where you are (cold, hot, etc), what type of work (Law? Investment Banking? Government? or a high tech company where hanes t-shirts are the uniform?). Also would help to know if standard sizes are a fit for you or if you need something custom? For example, Natty Shirts will make shirts to your size sometimes for $20 each. Admittedly not the finest fabrics, but OK if the fit is good.

 

If you check Joseph A. Bank online clearance right now, you can get an all-cotton dress shirt for between $15 and $25 on their clearance items that ends tomorrow. how about wrinkle resistant cotton twill slacks? $12. Wool Pants for $40 in a bunch of colors. For where you are from a budget perspective, it will be hard to do better than these prices. 99% of the general population will never notice that your shirts aren't made from sea island cotton with hand-attached sleeves and collars. Lots of folks on the forum hate JAB, as its primarily a marketing company, but at these prices, if they have your size, you will have serviceable clothes while you get your feet under you.

 

http://www.josbank.com/menswear/shop/Product_11001_10050_401834

http://www.josbank.com/menswear/shop/Product_11001_10050_101509

http://www.josbank.com/menswear/shop/Product_11001_10050_349920

 

If the fit is good, you're properly cleaned and pressed, you'll be fine with inexpensive clothes. You can buy nicer stuff later.

 

Case in point. I just paid $1500 to have a suit made. I like it a lot. My brother got a suit off Amazon, 100% wool, for $100 even. He spent about $50 on alterations and he looks like a million bucks. I've just come to understand that due to fit issues, It will always cost me more to look well-fitted than he will have to pay, because he has no fit issues and a standard 42R fits him very well.

 

Yes, you can look great in inexpensive clothes.

Thank you for that link.

 

I will buy two wool pants in different shades of grey. $225 on sale to $39 is a great price. If possible, I'll buy a third pair of wool pants in taupe which looks like brown and light grey mixed together. Am I correct in assuming wool pants do not require cleaning after each wearing like cotton? How many times can wool pants be worn between dry cleaning?

 

As for shirts, I will buy 5 to start. I'll buy a two of the Jos A Banks shirts on clearance, and 3 Brook Brothers shirts with light patterns on clearance at Nordstrom Rack.

 

I will be working in an entry level position in finance.

 

If I have enough money left over I will buy a sports coat on clearance from Jos A Banks for $79.

 

What is the opinion on the combination of grey wool pants, light blue dress shirt or a dress shirt with a light checkered pattern, and a grey or blue sports coat?

post #73 of 120
You can look good buying cheap clothing.

Just put some money in your budget for alterations.

Cheap clothing that fits well can look great.
post #74 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by jebarne View Post


If the fit is good, you're properly cleaned and pressed, you'll be fine with inexpensive clothes. You can buy nicer stuff later. Case in point. I just paid $1500 to have a suit made. I like it a lot. My brother got a suit off Amazon, 100% wool, for $100 even. He spent about $50 on alterations and he looks like a million bucks. I've just come to understand that due to fit issues, It will always cost me more to look well-fitted than he will have to pay, because he has no fit issues and a standard 42R fits him very well. Yes, you can look great in inexpensive clothes.

Truer words were never spoken. Jebarne linked to decent stuff. However, you will need to take everything to your new best friend (your tailor). Pants need to be shortened, legs need to be slimmed. Shirts need to be taken in at waist by putting darts in the back, and sleeves need to be slimmed as well. It's the difference between looking great and looking like you're wearing a smock.
post #75 of 120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Upward View Post

Thank you for that link.

I will buy two wool pants in different shades of grey. $225 on sale to $39 is a great price. If possible, I'll buy a third pair of wool pants in taupe which looks like brown and light grey mixed together. Am I correct in assuming wool pants do not require cleaning after each wearing like cotton? How many times can wool pants be worn between dry cleaning?

As for shirts, I will buy 5 to start. I'll buy a two of the Jos A Banks shirts on clearance, and 3 Brook Brothers shirts with light patterns on clearance at Nordstrom Rack.

I will be working in an entry level position in finance.

If I have enough money left over I will buy a sports coat on clearance from Jos A Banks for $79.

What is the opinion on the combination of grey wool pants, light blue dress shirt or a dress shirt with a light checkered pattern, and a grey or blue sports coat?

Not a bad start. You'll want to add more variety sooner rather than later, but this can get you through for a bit. As far as dry cleaning, I'd dry clean one per season at most unless you have some awful stain you have to get out. You may need to press or get your trousers pressed more often so they keep their crease and continue to look neat, but dry cleaning should be a rarity. Just hang them up after each wearing and rotate them so they have time to rest.

Do you have a suit? If not, I think that is a more useful purchase than a sport coat. If so, adding a sport coat in some versatile color isn't a bad choice, though in your position, I'd rather get another pair of pants and another shirt.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Is it possible to look good buying cheap clothing?