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How We Used to Dress - Page 6

post #76 of 157

Amazing . . . . have't seen anything this fucked up in quite a while.   lurker[1].gif

post #77 of 157
lurker[1].gif
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Copeland View Post

Below is an article link of interest:

"Why I wear Skirts all the time"

That sounds like Plymouth Brethren.
post #78 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeDT View Post

lurker[1].gif
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Copeland View Post

Below is an article link of interest:

"Why I wear Skirts all the time"

That sounds like Plymouth Brethren.


Oh boy, some of the more humorous on these boards could absofuckinlutely knock it out of the park on the comments section of this PRICELESS article (Why I Wear Skirts). Please share with the class if you do!!!

post #79 of 157

There was a good thread on this topic, with color photos from the 1940s thanks to bmulford:

 

http://www.styleforum.net/t/74417/sartorial-color-photos-from-1940-a-look-back

 

 

post #80 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Copeland View Post

For your reading . . .

 

 

700


are they books or jpg's?    

post #81 of 157
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dbhdnhdbh View Post

To get back to Mens dress, is that picture really representative of New Yorkers at the time? U free I like those outfits more than today's professional dress for men, but I don't believe construction workers, messengers, firefighters, cops, etc dressed like that.[/quote

No they didn't.
Although my guess is that messengers wore suits and neckties,
on in the case of Western Union, uniforms:

http://sirismm.si.edu/archivcenter/misc/02020504.jpg
post #82 of 157

I think the change that has been most striking is the difference in how college students dress.  Up until 1969, students at Harvard had to wear a jacket and tie to be served in their house dining halls, whereas these days, they sometimes appear wearing pajama pants.

 

Here are Harvard students in a lecture hall in 1938.  

 

 

 

 

The students, by the way, are applauding a lecture by Professor Samuel Williston.  The photos were taken in 1938, but he was born in 1861 (the first year of the Civil War), and he did not pass away until 1963, over a century later: http://harvardmagazine.com/2006/01/samuel-williston.html

 

Princeton students in 1950:

 

 

 

Sources: http://images.google.com/hosted/life/de17aa3a7f4ff942.html

 

http://images.google.com/hosted/life/7f58045ddcc2fcf2.html


Edited by CrimsonSox - 7/28/13 at 9:17pm
post #83 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apollotrader View Post


Oh boy, some of the more humorous on these boards could absofuckinlutely knock it out of the park on the comments section of this PRICELESS article (Why I Wear Skirts). Please share with the class if you do!!!

You never meet Plymouth Brethren and had to work with them? That''s why I saw that blog, and immediate though this is Brethren. If you're not familiar with them, it might seem "priceless".....see also Amish, Darbyites or Mennonites.
Edited by MikeDT - 7/29/13 at 7:11am
post #84 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by CrimsonSox View Post

I think the change that has been most striking is the difference in how college students dress.  Up until 1969, students at Harvard had to wear a jacket and tie to be served in their house dining halls, whereas these days, they sometimes appear wearing pajama pants.

Here are Harvard students in a lecture hall in 1938.  









The students, by the way, are applauding a lecture by Professor Samuel Williston.  The photos were taken in 1938, but he was born in 1861 (the first year of the Civil War), and he did not pass away until 1963, over a century later: http://harvardmagazine.com/2006/01/samuel-williston.html


Princeton students in 1950:







Sources: http://images.google.com/hosted/life/de17aa3a7f4ff942.html


http://images.google.com/hosted/life/7f58045ddcc2fcf2.html

By the fact it's Harvard, doesn't that just assume that they're middle class and upper class, i.e. they're rich and affluent ? Whether it be 1930s or today?
post #85 of 157

More true in the 1930s than today. Especially true at the turn of the century. What leaps out at me is the absence of women in those pictures.

post #86 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by comrade View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by dbhdnhdbh View Post

 I don't believe construction workers, messengers, firefighters, cops, etc dressed like that.

No they didn't.
 

 


post #87 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by Claghorn View Post

More true in the 1930s than today. Especially true at the turn of the century. What leaps out at me is the absence of women in those pictures.

post #88 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by size 38R View Post


are they books or jpg's?    


They are books, and are still available at Amazon.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by David Copeland View Post

For your reading . . .

 

 

700

post #89 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeDT View Post


By the fact it's Harvard, doesn't that just assume that they're middle class and upper class, i.e. they're rich and affluent ? Whether it be 1930s or today?

 

More affluent people have always dressed better, in general, than other classes.  The issue is how people within each class have dressed differently over time.  In a Harvard dining hall today, there would be middle and upper class students, but many of them would be dressed in T-shirts, shorts, and sweatpants.  Back in the 1930s and even the 1950s, they had to wear neckties and jackets just to be served.

post #90 of 157
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Claghorn View Post

More true in the 1930s than today. Especially true at the turn of the century. What leaps out at me is the absence of women in those pictures.

Harvard was not coed until the 70s. Women attended Radcliffe College a separate womens school
affiliated with Harvard.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radcliffe_College
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