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How should dress shoes fit?

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 

Dress shoes are typically are narrower and pointed near the tip, so I was wondering if that narrow portion of the shoe is supposed to be filled up by your feet, or is the narrow pointy section of the shoe supposed to be empty?

If the latter is so, are dress shoes typically longer than, say, sneakers, of the same size?

 

Any input appreciated! Thanks.

post #2 of 17

like a glove

post #3 of 17
^ Then you're wearing them wrong. wink.gif
post #4 of 17
Properly like any other shoe. Do you have pointed feet?
post #5 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by annms View Post

Dress shoes are typically are narrower and pointed near the tip, so I was wondering if that narrow portion of the shoe is supposed to be filled up by your feet, or is the narrow pointy section of the shoe supposed to be empty?
If the latter is so, are dress shoes typically longer than, say, sneakers, of the same size?

Any input appreciated! Thanks.
No, there is typically a gap between the toes and the tip of the shoe. Because of the varying shapes, it is usually more reliable to use the heel to ball fit while standing (which is my preference but others prefer sitting/no weight) when examining fit.

My smart shoes are definitely longer than my trainers. However, my trainers are typically a half size larger (I am a runner and talking about running shoes). I believe they are made on the smaller end (maybe half smaller) to have a lighter weight to market efficiency in the running community. Hence, my trainers are typically 0.5 size bigger than my actual Brannock/smart shoe size.
post #6 of 17
-From that conversation on Ville's site. Something to start with, although nothing beats a professional fitting if you can find it:



-Shoes don’t “break in”. Your foot does, however.

-Heavier soles do need to develop a flex point, and can sometimes feel “loose” at first. Don’t buy smaller thinking that’s a better fit.

-Your ball and arch are the most critical fitting elements in shoes…and it’s easy to verify the correct position. It makes no difference where your toes end, so don’t bother to pinch and squeeze looking for where your toes are. If you were to lose your toes, you would still wear the same size shoe. If you place your right hand on your left, palm on palm, and slightly squeeze with your left fingers around your right hand, that’s how your shoes should feel. Totally free in the toe box and a nice firm feel around the arch and ball.’
post #7 of 17

At the risk of going against the grain, I'm going to try to give a helpful answer. For the most part, sneakers have a similar shape; the toes are always round. Dress shoes are different. Some of them have rounded toes, so all of your toes may come close to touching the end of the shoe. However, some shoes have more elongated/extended toes, and the shoe gets longer as it goes from your smallest to largest toe. In those cases, usually, your small toes will touch the end of the shoe, but your big toe won't. Just make sure that the toe's not comically long.

post #8 of 17
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the responses DpprDr, RIDER, and VinnyMac.  All your answers were very helpful, and each have subtle points the others didn't mention.

 

Thanks again, appreciate it.

post #9 of 17
This illustration demonstrates how a different toe shape will change the length of the shoe, without effecting the overall fit:

post #10 of 17
Too add a few thoughts...there are no concerns if the shoe extends beyond your toes a little. As long as you are not tripping over them as you walk and they don't appear as clown shoes. Dress shoes should not be tight. Slightly snug but easily allowing wiggle room is best. If your feet 'swim' in the shoes they may be too wide or altogether too big. Also consider your intended use for the shoes. Example- if you live in cold winter climates you will want to size the shoes to accomodate thicker socks. When buying shoes, (assuming you work a 9-5 job) shop in the evening when your feet are the largest. Feet are always larger after you've used them all day.
Your sneaker size is not necessarily your dress shoe size. With many sneakers there is a removable insert that reduces the shoe cavity. Example- You may take a size 12 in sneakers but may wear a 10.5 in a dress shoe. If you remove the insert from the sneakers, then place your feet into them, it will become clear that the outer shell of the sneaker is a 12, but not the inside once the insert is in place. Lastly, never buy tight shoes just because you got a deal on them. Proper fit is very important or you'll just end up wasting your money. Welcome to Styleforum annms.
post #11 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by bengal-stripe View Post

This illustration demonstrates how a different toe shape will change the length of the shoe, without effecting the overall fit:


What if its a cap toe and cap toe line/stiffener crushes your feet?

Had the experience where (captoe) shoes fits fine in store, sitting, driving, but hurts like crazy after walking a few miles.

I've been told that feet will swell if blood veins on the back of feet are constricted, which would cause pain.
post #12 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by chogall View Post

What if its a cap toe and cap toe line/stiffener crushes your feet?

Had the experience where (captoe) shoes fits fine in store, sitting, driving, but hurts like crazy after walking a few miles.

Then the shoe does not fit your particular foot.

This can have various reasons, for example the shoe is too short, so the point where the shoe takes off to taper down to the tip begins too early, (Very common for people with a slim foot which are forced to select their shoes for circumference, as a shoe of the right length will be too wide).

Alternatively the shoe is too wide, so heel and back foot are not supported as they should be. With every step your foot slides back and forth, pushing your toes into the narrowing toe box.
post #13 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by bengal-stripe View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by chogall View Post

What if its a cap toe and cap toe line/stiffener crushes your feet?

Had the experience where (captoe) shoes fits fine in store, sitting, driving, but hurts like crazy after walking a few miles.

Then the shoe does not fit your particular foot.

This can have various reasons, for example the shoe is too short, so the point where the shoe takes off to taper down to the tip begins too early, (Very common for people with a slim foot which are forced to select their shoes for circumference, as a shoe of the right length will be too wide).

Alternatively the shoe is too wide, so heel and back foot are not supported as they should be. With every step your foot slides back and forth, pushing your toes into the narrowing toe box.

great info, though my feet would never sit that far into the toes of my shoes.
post #14 of 17

yea, my feet also would never sit that far into the toes of my shoes.

post #15 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by bengal-stripe View Post

Then the shoe does not fit your particular foot.

This can have various reasons, for example the shoe is too short, so the point where the shoe takes off to taper down to the tip begins too early, (Very common for people with a slim foot which are forced to select their shoes for circumference, as a shoe of the right length will be too wide).

Alternatively the shoe is too wide, so heel and back foot are not supported as they should be. With every step your foot slides back and forth, pushing your toes into the narrowing toe box.

Well the interesting thing is the arches aligns almost perfectly. Length are okay as well.

The problem is most likely due to lack of toe space. Thus I don't think fitting to the arch is the most important factor as oppose to what Ron suggests.

The horror of RTW.
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