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What Has Been the Worst Era for Men's Suits? - Page 6

post #76 of 146
While I share your disdain for an outfit such as that exemplified by the picture, I stand by my previous contentions that:

A - in the world in which I live I seldom if ever see that in the wild (and I travel all over the US regularly on business), and therefore ...
B - nothing, not even that, is anywhere near as bad as those seventies pictures shown upthread.
post #77 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ianiceman View Post

While I share your disdain for an outfit such as that exemplified by the picture, I stand by my previous contentions that:

A - in the world in which I live I seldom if ever see that in the wild (and I travel all over the US regularly on business), and therefore ...
B - nothing, not even that, is anywhere near as bad as those seventies pictures shown upthread.

Yeah, but nearly all the 70s pix shown are of wedding or prom costumes. (I won't dignify them by calling them "tuxedoes.") The suits and sportcoats had wide lapels but they were nothing like those ridiculous getups. Quite of lot of today's rental finery for weddings is pretty bad too.
post #78 of 146

The worst era for suits has to be the recent "Skinny suit" period we are hopefully emerging out of.lol8[1].gif
 

post #79 of 146
The conspicuously tight look is hardly a new thing.

The actor George Raft was famous for his ultra-fitted suits:



post #80 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing View Post

The conspicuously tight look is hardly a new thing.

The actor George Raft was famous for his ultra-fitted suits:




i really like the lower pic, and yes he apparently liked his suits " fitted". 

what i mean is the recent hipster style skinny suits like this below.

and ankle high pants, loafers, no socks.  just an awful trend.  anyway, stylish people don't wear "fashion"..

followers wear fashion.  haha, see the guy taking self shots to post on facebook!!  " i look awesome" lol8[1].gif

post #81 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by size 38R View Post


i really like the lower pic, and yes he apparently liked his suits " fitted". 
what i mean is the recent hipster style skinny suits like this below.


and ankle high pants, loafers, no socks.  just an awful trend.  anyway, stylish people don't wear "fashion"..
followers wear fashion.  haha, see the guy taking self shots to post on facebook!!  " i look awesome" lol8%5B1%5D.gif

Actually George Raft was considered quite a fashionplate back then. Of course that sort of influence can only stem from personal style and taste.
post #82 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing View Post


Actually George Raft was considered quite a fashionplate back then. Of course that sort of influence can only stem from personal style and taste.


he would definitely set the standard even today. thanks for telling us about him.fing02[1].gif

post #83 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing View Post




I know George Raft made a specialty of playing tough guys in movies and reputedly was a crony of the mafiosi. Nonetheless, the extreme waist suppression on that suit makes the whole outfit look rather womanish--at least in my eyes.
post #84 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by JLibourel View Post

I know George Raft made a specialty of playing tough guys in movies and reputedly was a crony of the mafiosi. Nonetheless, the extreme waist suppression on that suit makes the whole outfit look rather womanish--at least in my eyes.

Evidently George Raft's underground connections also molded his style sense which became quite influential due to his cinematic presence. Unlike some of his contemporaries he isn't really well-known these days.

Raft was supposedly the one who set the popular prototype of what a well-dressed gangster looked like: chalk-striped suits, jauntily angled hats, two-tone shoes, dark shirt with light necktie.

Here's another ultra-fitted Raft look:

post #85 of 146
^Even disregarding the fact that the photo is "flopped," that suit looks bloody awful--simply way too tight!

Again, the extreme suppression makes the suit look feminine. The "hourglass figure" has been desirable for women, but not for us men.
Edited by JLibourel - 7/22/13 at 3:46pm
post #86 of 146
A quick look at some random advertisements of the era makes it appear that a severely nipped waist was fashionable during Raft's time.





post #87 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing View Post

Evidently George Raft's underground connections also molded his style sense which became quite influential due to his cinematic presence. Unlike some of his contemporaries he isn't really well-known these days.

Raft was supposedly the one who set the popular prototype of what a well-dressed gangster looked like: chalk-striped suits, jauntily angled hats, two-tone shoes, dark shirt with light necktie.

Here's another ultra-fitted Raft look:


Interestingly, this look as exemplified by Raft coincided with the "English Drape style" which came out of
Savile Row's Frederic Scholte. It was a more relaxed cut still favored by such practicioners as Anderson and
Shepard. This illustrates the obvious fact that an era is not necessarily dominated by one style. As I have
already said, In the 70s my tailored clothing was almost the same as today, except that the lapels were maybe
a half inch wider and shirt collar points longer. I shopped only in Ivy -type stores.

http://www.gentlemansgazette.com/drape-cut/
post #88 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by JLibourel View Post


Yeah, but nearly all the 70s pix shown are of wedding or prom costumes. (I won't dignify them by calling them "tuxedoes.") The suits and sportcoats had wide lapels but they were nothing like those ridiculous getups. Quite of lot of today's rental finery for weddings is pretty bad too.

 

I will agree with you that most people haven't known how to dress for (especially daytime) formal occasions in at least 45 years. Today's Men's Wearhouse rental wonder, centered around the black suit with wizard robe sleeves and the color matched satin-like (usually ill-fitting) vest, tie and pocket-square, is pretty bad. But the 70's equivalents, with their insane lapels, hideous colors and ruffles (oh those wonderful 70's baroque ruffles...) were just wonderfully terrible. While every decade has it's extremes and questionable fashion trends, the 70's is truly unique in both the extreme vulgarity of those trends and the remarkably wide adoption of bad-taste (seriously, it was as if everyone was on drugs).

post #89 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by MisterFu View Post

I will agree with you that most people haven't known how to dress for (especially daytime) formal occasions in at least 45 years. Today's Men's Wearhouse rental wonder, centered around the black suit with wizard robe sleeves and the color matched satin-like (usually ill-fitting) vest, tie and pocket-square, is pretty bad. But the 70's equivalents, with their insane lapels, hideous colors and ruffles (oh those wonderful 70's baroque ruffles...) were just wonderfully terrible.[

Are we talking about "suits" here or "tuxedoes." I would concede that the '70s were worse for the latter, but not the former.
Quote:
While every decade has it's extremes and questionable fashion trends, the 70's is truly unique in both the extreme vulgarity of those trends and the remarkably wide adoption of bad-taste (seriously, it was as if everyone was on drugs).

Weren't they?
post #90 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by JLibourel View Post


Are we talking about "suits" here or "tuxedoes." I would concede that the '70s were worse for the latter, but not the former.

I suppose we will have to politely agree to disagree as I strongly feel that the 70's was a horror show for both. IMHO, the super-bold check pattern, polyester nightmares in that uniquely 70's rainbow of buzzard puke colors and horrifying tie and shirt patterns are simply unmatched in their awfulness by any post-industrial decade, before or since. Yes, there were people wearing well tailored and traditionally stylish suits (my own fathers Dege & Skinner suits being a great example). However, that isn't what Macy's customers were buying. That, to me, is one of the biggest differences; I can count the number of Thom Browne suits I have seen walking the streets of Manhattan on one hand. The awful 70's stuff people actually wore in great numbers! I can vividly remember all the awful plaid suits walking the streets from my childhood. This alone makes the 70's, in my opinion, by far the worst era.

 

That said, if I were suddenly transported to an alternate universe where everyone was dressed like this;

 

 

I'd probably feel very differently about the 70's versus today.

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