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What Has Been the Worst Era for Men's Suits? - Page 9

post #121 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrDaniels View Post

The fact that both buttons are buttoned speaks volumes about the fact that no one involved knows anything about suits.

All of the things that are wrong with that image, and that's what tips you off?

 

In fact, I'm pretty sure that pic isn't real - it's a photoshop composite. Look at the right lapel & collar area - how is that casting a shadow onto the shirt like that?

post #122 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by Calder View Post

All of the things that are wrong with that image, and that's what tips you off?

In fact, I'm pretty sure that pic isn't real - it's a photoshop composite. Look at the right lapel & collar area - how is that casting a shadow onto the shirt like that?

It's casting a shadow like that on the shirt because the lapel is bowing so far off the chest. If it were sitting flat like it's supposed to, there wouldn't be a shadow. What a horrible fitting suit.
post #123 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing View Post

No "dress guns" I take it.

I believe the proper term in Texas is "barbecue gun" ---a flashy gun, engraved or at least nickel plated, with ivory or MOP stocks for open carry at a barbecue--typically, a large, gala, often semi-public event in that part of the world.
post #124 of 146
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post #125 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by 12345Michael54321 View Post

 

 

Quote:

 

This stuff rocks. How can anyone not like this? The one and only decade of the 20th century when men were not only allowed, but encouraged, to peacock themselves.

 

I so want to be that guy with the yellow pents.

post #126 of 146

I also like this. I would never, ever in a million years wear it. But it confounds our expectations, it breaks all the rules, it thumbs its nose at conformity and the hive mind.

 

All human clothing is inherently ridiculous. This stuff just openly celebrates that fact.

 

 

     

post #127 of 146

early 90s for me. Everything was bad, can't think of a single good thing. 

 

Huge, baggy dress shirts with very narrow point collars. 

4-5" wide "power" ties with tiny knots

Square toed Kenneth Cole shoes 

Baggy, low-gorge DB suits that were carried from the late 80s...Or even worse: huge, baggy 3 and 4-button suits.

post #128 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by dreamspace View Post
 

early 90s for me. Everything was bad, can't think of a single good thing. 

 

 

 

 

Really?  I was a fan of the suits in the X-Files myself.

post #129 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by mactire View Post


Really?  I was a fan of the suits in the X-Files myself.

I've been watching the series recently and aside from the baggy pants (and shirts) and way too big shoulders they're not bad at all. At least they don't have slim lapels, gorges that try to disappear on the shoulders or buttoning points at the diaphragm.
post #130 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coxsackie View Post
 

I also like this. I would never, ever in a million years wear it. But it confounds our expectations, it breaks all the rules, it thumbs its nose at conformity and the hive mind.

 

All human clothing is inherently ridiculous. This stuff just openly celebrates that fact.

 

 

     

Looks like standard hipster rubbish to me.

post #131 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by MisterFu View Post


Of course, even the worst of today, the 00's, 90's and the 80's pales in comparison to the drug induced decade-long horror show of the 1970's:





Those of us who remember the seventies (I was but a pup) have been laughing at this kind of thing for the ensuing decades.

Imagine my surprise when I came to StYFo and found that there's a sizeable contingent who not only admire these laughably hideous broad check jackets but actually wear them, and the equally risible outerwear equivalent, the 'granny coat', In daylight!

Maybe its an American thing. I'm pretty sure many/most/all of us Brits are still laughing at them. I don't think there's any/many of us wearing them.
post #132 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing View Post

Raft was supposedly the one who set the popular prototype of what a well-dressed gangster looked like: chalk-striped suits, jauntily angled hats, two-tone shoes, dark shirt with light necktie.

 

I have read that it was Arnold Rothstein who set the style for all of the prohibition era gangsters.

post #133 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ianiceman View Post


Those of us who remember the seventies (I was but a pup) have been laughing at this kind of thing for the ensuing decades.

Imagine my surprise when I came to StYFo and found that there's a sizeable contingent who not only admire these laughably hideous broad check jackets but actually wear them, and the equally risible outerwear equivalent, the 'granny coat', In daylight!

Maybe its an American thing. I'm pretty sure many/most/all of us Brits are still laughing at them. I don't think there's any/many of us wearing them.

Outside of a few seriously misguided SF members, most of my countrymen are still laughing at them as well. 

 

I quite like check patterns and have several suites (including one I just had made) that have reasonably subtle examples of such. However, when you look like a test pattern, you are just flat-out doing it wrong. 

post #134 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by EMartNJ View Post

I have read that it was Arnold Rothstein who set the style for all of the prohibition era gangsters.

I just did a quick Google search of images of Rothstein. From what I could see, he was a very conventional dresser for his time--no bold pinstripes, black shirts with white ties or anything like that. He did have a penchant for bowties, but they were much more common in his day, not having acquired the contemporary stigma of "dweebishness" or eccentricity.
post #135 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coxsackie View Post

I also like this. I would never, ever in a million years wear it. But it confounds our expectations, it breaks all the rules, it thumbs its nose at conformity and the hive mind.

All human clothing is inherently ridiculous. This stuff just openly celebrates that fact.

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

     

True.

However, (not including the silvery longwing shoes) if a lot of the Thom Browne stuff such as shown in those pictures was decently sized, instead of shrunken down, and not all shoved into the one outfit, most of it would look good.

A lot of it is nice stuff, it's just too small and jumbled together.
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