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Leather Quality and Properties - Page 61

post #901 of 1279
Just wondering, are rustic, scotch and hatch grain calf natural? or they are printed?
post #902 of 1279
Quote:
Originally Posted by wurger View Post

Just wondering, are rustic, scotch and hatch grain calf natural? or they are printed?

All imposed/processed...all corrected grain, in a sense.
post #903 of 1279
thanks for the answer. smile.gif
post #904 of 1279

Just a thought. I have found shoe companies quite willing to answer e-mails about the leather they use. This includes questions about corrected grain leather. I have found it useful to be direct - 'are your X shoes made of corrected leather', where X is the type of shoes you are inquiring about. 

post #905 of 1279
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post

Just a thought. I have found shoe companies quite willing to answer e-mails about the leather they use. This includes questions about corrected grain leather. I have found it useful to be direct - 'are your X shoes made of corrected leather', where X is the type of shoes you are inquiring about. 

I'm sure that's true...depending on your definition of a satisfactory answer.

For instance, neither scotch grain nor hatch grain are currently or conveniently thought of as corrected grain.

Yet the hides don't come off the animal or from the tanner with these textures--they are applied, using various methods, to the grain surface of the leather after tanning. And sometimes they can be very useful in covering or camouflaging defects or rough grain.

And if changing the natural grain surface to induce an unnatural feel or appearance...perhaps even to counterfeit some other leather (ie alligator or ostrich prints)...isn't "correcting" the grain, then someone, somewhere, is playing fast and loose with definitions in the service of marketing.
post #906 of 1279
Yes, to be honest, I never thought of them as corrected grain before because even top end makers use them for country shoes and charge the same for them compare to full grain.
post #907 of 1279
Quote:
Originally Posted by wurger View Post

Yes, to be honest, I never thought of them as corrected grain before because even top end makers use them for country shoes and charge the same for them compare to full grain.

I wouldn't hesitate to use them either...if a customer asked for them and I had a source. It's not as "bad" as bonded leather but even there we need to remember that bonded leather is still leather...for whatever that's worth...and has its uses. For instance, last time I looked, all modern patent leather was bonded leather.
post #908 of 1279
Him, more question, what is bonded leather? How is the different to corrected grain? shog[1].gif
post #909 of 1279
Quote:
Originally Posted by wurger View Post

Him, more question, what is bonded leather? How is the different to corrected grain? shog[1].gif

What I'm referring to with the term "bonded leather" is a top grain (usually) hide...often cow, rather than calf, that has been severely scoured on the grainside in preparation for having a sheet of vinyl or other synthetic bonded to it. Sometimes it's not even top grain but a split to which the plastic is bonded. Often time such leather is sold in consistent widths and by the yard just as naugahyde would be sold. This process very nearly rescues leather that otherwise could not be used for either cosmetic and/or strength related reasons.

Corrected grain as the term is used currently (and as I understand it) is top grain leather that can be of decent quality but is marred or scarred or otherwise grain damaged, which is buffed and to which a thick, opaque finish is added to smooth out and cover the grain damage. It's a paint job rather than a bonded extra layer. This creates a product that would otherwise be considered cosmetically undesirable although perhaps not entirely unusable.

Technically speaking, almost all non-aniline leathers could be termed "corrected grain" because the true nature and character of the leather has been obscured by the finish.
post #910 of 1279
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

For instance, last time I looked, all modern patent leather was bonded leather.
I was guessing by your use of the word "modern" that this was not always the case so I googled it. Prior to plastics it was created with coats of linseed oil on full grain leather?
post #911 of 1279
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fred G. Unn View Post

I was guessing by your use of the word "modern" that this was not always the case so I googled it. Prior to plastics it was created with coats of linseed oil on full grain leather?

That's my understanding as well, although at some point in time it was also done with lacquer. Mostly all before my time and I've never had much interest in working with patent ...so take my comments with a grain of salt.
post #912 of 1279
Interesting. I've often used a boiled linseed oil and wax finish on woodworking projects. Never thought about what it would do to leather before.
post #913 of 1279
Very informative! Thank you again.
post #914 of 1279
Quote:
Originally Posted by wurger View Post

Very informative! Thank you again.

smile.gif
post #915 of 1279

Thank you DFII for your response to mine and other postings. You are, as usual, very informative. 

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