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Leather Quality and Properties - Page 58

post #856 of 1312
Fantastic thread. Can't believe I'm only now discovering this. Another great example of why I love Styleforum.

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post #857 of 1312
Can someone explain what Kudu leather is please
post #858 of 1312
Kudu is an African antelope, and it's leather lends itself to casual or hard use and is usually oil finished. Workwear leather.
post #859 of 1312
so is it on the reverse side? or is it on the regular side and oiled? for example: Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

i assume thats on the regular side and oiled?
post #860 of 1312
In my opinion kudu isn't significantly tougher than any other leather. It's an antelope and not like hippo or elephant. What I have seen had an almost Scotch grain surface--probably embossed. So the boots shown above might be kudu, might not be kudu, or might be fleshside out.

But turning a leather fleshside out and stuffing it with oil does not make it any tougher than it inherently is. Perhaps less susceptible to visual / cosmetic damage but not tougher.
post #861 of 1312

Also of note, Horween evidently produces a heavily oiled leather that is manufactured using their Chromexcel recipe, which is also called Kudu.  Alden makes some of their Indy boots from this.  I just mention it to prevent confusion.


Edited by MoneyWellSpent - 11/19/13 at 8:05am
post #862 of 1312
Quote:
Originally Posted by MoneyWellSpent View Post

Also of note, Horween evidently produces a heavily oiled calfskin leather that is manufactured using their Chromexcel recipe, which is also called Kudu.  Alden makes some of their Indy boots from this.  I just mention it to prevent confusion.


 



Correct. I have a pair of Alden 'Kudu' chukkas and I'm pretty sure no part of that shoe has ever been to Africa. :-)
post #863 of 1312
Quote:
Originally Posted by MoneyWellSpent View Post

Also of note, Horween evidently produces a heavily oiled leather that is manufactured using their Chromexcel recipe, which is also called Kudu.  Alden makes some of their Indy boots from this.  I just mention it to prevent confusion.

That's a good point. Lots of leather gets "named" and the name may not have any relationship at all to the reality.

For instance, Bullhide is seldom bull hide; Mule is almost never mule. Many examples of that in the Industry.
post #864 of 1312
Has there ever been an attempt to unify these leather names at least within one country? It seems devious and stupid to name some hide as kudu when it hasn't even heard of Africa.
post #865 of 1312
Quote:
Originally Posted by VRaivio View Post

Has there ever been an attempt to unify these leather names at least within one country? It seems devious and stupid to name some hide as kudu when it hasn't even heard of Africa.

 



Agreed. I'm sure many who are less informed think they are buying actual Kudu. I have to give props to the SA who sold me the pair though - he knew the story and was entirely candid about the process.
post #866 of 1312
Names are far too often misused in this trade unfortunately and although I have used some ethically sourced exotics over the years, I now stick predominately to Bridle leather and Saddle hide.

Here again I find the terms and names used incorrectly in a regular and misleading way. There are many companies selling 'Bridle Hide' and 'Bridle leather' goods made of leather that would no more resemble true bridle leather than I do. My opinion (for what it is worth ) is that the name should be clearly derived from either the original purpose of the leather or be named after it's former owner.

Keep this great Leather discussion going folks.
post #867 of 1312
Quote:
Originally Posted by TimH View Post

Names are far too often misused in this trade unfortunately and although I have used some ethically sourced exotics over the years, I now stick predominately to Bridle leather and Saddle hide.

Here again I find the terms and names used incorrectly in a regular and misleading way. There are many companies selling 'Bridle Hide' and 'Bridle leather' goods made of leather that would no more resemble true bridle leather than I do. My opinion (for what it is worth ) is that the name should be clearly derived from either the original purpose of the leather or be named after it's former owner.

Keep this great Leather discussion going folks.

Cuts all the way across the board. Not enough youngsters getting into the Trade but those that do have a hard time understanding how important it is to respect and preserve the lexicon. For the longest time I called the toe stiffener a "toe box" and the heel stiffener a "counter. My only excuse is that that's the way I was taught. The correct term, of course, is toe stiffener and while that may not mean anything to folks who really don't care, it makes for way better communication between shoemakers, if nothing else, and avoids a lot of misunderstanding. It also preserves the Traditions of the Trade.

Part of this, I think, is that students seldom have any proper teachers. So they are caught between what little they can learn from legitimate sources and what passes for understanding in the general population. A lot of casual, incorrect, and even misleading terms enter the discussion. "Handwelted Goodyear" is a really good example; or thinking that GY describes a general approach and that all welted shoes can be described as GY...which is simply not true.

It is a watering down and and a leveling to the lowest common denominator.

And yes, it is terribly misleading...even dishonest in some cases. But it's all part of the 'two M's"--marketing and manufacturing.
post #868 of 1312
Well, you CAN get footwear made from real Kudu:

http://www.chichesterinc.com/KuduLeather.htm

http://www.gordonfootwear.co.za/index.php?page=shop.product_details&product_id=50&flypage=flypage.tpl&pop=0&option=com_virtuemart&Itemid=11

So it would appear that Horween thought that Kudu would be a catchy name for a softer version of their oiled leather, despite it not coming from an antelope?
post #869 of 1312
I would love to get into shoemaking as a hobby with the permission and support of my boss.

This forum is fortunately enough to have had Shoefan making some incredible shoes for himself as an amateur.
post #870 of 1312
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hayward View Post

Well, you CAN get footwear made from real Kudu:

http://www.chichesterinc.com/KuduLeather.htm

http://www.gordonfootwear.co.za/index.php?page=shop.product_details&product_id=50&flypage=flypage.tpl&pop=0&option=com_virtuemart&Itemid=11

So it would appear that Horween thought that Kudu would be a catchy name for a softer version of their oiled leather, despite it not coming from an antelope?

Yes,

I've made boots out of kudu...real once. I wasn't all that impressed. When a company give a name like that to a leather that isn't really kudu or mule or whatever, the main reason is to create the false impression that it shares some or a lot the characteristics of the real thing...even if it's just the visual image of the brawny ild African antelope.

Isn't that a form of deception? Kind of along the same lines as Faux leather.
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