or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Leather Quality and Properties
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Leather Quality and Properties - Page 56

post #826 of 1235
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

I love heating up my prick.

Naturally or lighting a candle beneath? As the masters have said and I quote "you don't want to get the roller/prick too hot"..
post #827 of 1235
Friction. That's all I'll say. nod[1].gif
post #828 of 1235
Quote:
Originally Posted by sstomcat View Post

Interesting, have to visit some day

Quote:
Originally Posted by MoneyWellSpent View Post

It is worth it.  Definitely a cool place.

Of all places, I actually graduated from the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg (class of `00). smile.gif
Spent 4 years living right by the CW area, and I had the privilege to jog back and forth on the Duke of Gloucester (DOG) Street every morning (before the tourists arrive). Definitely a beautiful place to visit.
post #829 of 1235
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

Spot on. The manufactured prick does make an indentation but it doesn't spread the leather as much. I suppose that if we got down to cases, the manufactured one is the more Traditional.

Stitch pricks are almost the ultimate...if not original...multi-tasker in shoemaking, however. I use the thin one to clean seams, define edges on outsoles and heels, spreading glue and clearing glue, as well as clean stitches of excess wax.

I use the handmade one for all those chores plus opening channels, pressing insole lining into corners. And a lot more uses that escape my mind at the moment.

I can't count all the times I reach for the pricker-up, but probably as much or more than any other tool esp. when bottoming.

I was referring to the Vass book and they use a thread marker both before and after the stitching. Does the same thing except the indentation marks outside of the stitching area.
post #830 of 1235
Quote:
Originally Posted by sstomcat View Post

I was referring to the Vass book and they use a thread marker both before and after the stitching. Does the same purpose except the indentation marks outside of the stitching area.

I don't recall that. I'll have to look later this morning when I get in the shop. What page is that on?
post #831 of 1235
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

I don't recall that. I'll have to look later this morning when I get in the shop. What page is that on?


Pg. 153.
post #832 of 1235
Quote:
Originally Posted by chichester View Post

I don't want to side-track this thread but thought that you might be interested in this. I seem to recall DWFII talking a while ago about leather soles and how they had been used on boots that had climbed Mt Everest. I was in Marylebone a couple of months ago and happened to pass James Taylor when, lo and behold, I saw the boot in the photograph below. Apologies both for the quality of the image (on my way somewhere else, absolutely my fault) and for the state of Taylor's window (not my fault at all). Chi Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)


Not to flog a dead horse as who should say but if I recall correctly I mentioned the Hilary boots in a discussion about whether rubber outsoles were were required for human beings to stand upright. sarcasm.gif

The first vibram outsoles date back to 1937, yet the people who were staking their lives on Everest, chose leather.

Might be something to learn from that.
post #833 of 1235
Quote:
Originally Posted by sstomcat View Post

Pg. 153.

thanks...
post #834 of 1235
Quote:
Originally Posted by sstomcat View Post

Pg. 153.

Oh yeah. I remember that tool now. I don't think I've ever seen another one like it...not even in catalogues from the 19th century. That said, my double stitch prick does very nearly the same thing, the same way...at least the way I use it. And it may very well have been those photos that got me to thinking that a caliper would work too as well. The real problem, as I see it, is getting your stitch marks at an even distance from the vamp. Your tool needs to be thin or curved to get in under the curves of the last.

The stitch prick's purpose is to separate and tighten the stitches, so it creates an indent between the stitches and going back over the stitches with a tool like the one in Handmade Shoes for Men is not necessary. Vass does it because they don't prick or fudge the stitches...at least not on that type of shoe.
post #835 of 1235
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

Oh yeah. I remember that tool now. I don't think I've ever seen another one like it...not even in catalogues from the 19th century. That said, my double stitch prick does very nearly the same thing, the same way...at least the way I use it. And it may very well have been those photos that got me to thinking that a caliper would work too as well. The real problem, as I see it, is getting your stitch marks at an even distance from the vamp. Your tool needs to be thin or curved to get in under the curves of the last.

The stitch prick's purpose is to separate and tighten the stitches, so it creates an indent between the stitches and going back over the stitches with a tool like the one in Handmade Shoes for Men is not necessary. Vass does it because they don't prick or fudge the stitches...at least not on that type of shoe.

I took a close look at all of Vass shoes in this design and they seem to have the stitches at a even distance from the out sole edge. Call it skill or experience or maybe both. All my shoes are made by only one person at Vass and I have heard that he is one of their best.
post #836 of 1235
Quote:
Originally Posted by sstomcat View Post

I took a close look at all of Vass shoes in this design and they seem to have the stitches at a even distance from the out sole edge. Call it skill or experience or maybe both. All my shoes are made by only one person at Vass and I have heard that he is one of their best.

Of course, it is both. But the tool is also setting the distance. A,nd another factor is that in the A-H tradition the welt work is 'writ large" so to speak. Stitches are long, welts are wide and everything is "in your face." No harm no foul, different horses...etc..

The point is that a thick tool is perfect for such work. If you use it on a more (ahem) refined shoe, the stitching would be too far from the vamp and the welts too wide.

IMO.
post #837 of 1235
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

Of course, it is both. But the tool is also setting the distance. A,nd another factor is that in the A-H tradition the welt work is 'writ large" so to speak. Stitches are long, welts are wide and everything is "in your face." No harm no foul, different horses...etc..

The point is that a thick tool is perfect for such work. If you use it on a more (ahem) refined shoe, the stitching would be too far from the vamp and the welts too wide.

IMO.

I agree, I don't know what they do for some of their sleeker lasts (U,K) as I do not wear those, probably a thinner lighter tool..anyway doesn't really matter.

I'd like to know how your stitch prick works to reach under the vamp with the last on specially when the welt is thin? Is difficult work I presume.
post #838 of 1235
DWF, I've always meant to ask you this, but since i've never really had a good excuse I have not. Do you have a preferred supplier for veg. tanned full grain bull hide? For furniture, not shoes.
post #839 of 1235

Really simple question here.

 

How does pricking or fudging tighten the stitches? Pressing down on the welt would seem to make the stitches looser, if one managed to move the leather much at all.

 

If one wanted the stitches tighter, why not pull them tighter when stitching rather than go back later and fudge or prick?

post #840 of 1235
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkinnyGoomba View Post

DWF, I've always meant to ask you this, but since i've never really had a good excuse I have not. Do you have a preferred supplier for veg. tanned full grain bull hide? For furniture, not shoes.

I don't, partially because broadly speaking there is no such thing as "bullhide." Male animals are castrated and often go to slaughter just barely at full weight --young IOW. Select bulls are kept for breeding purposes, and are not slaughtered for meat or hides.

What you see designated as "bullhide" is indeed an older animal--it can be of either, or indeterminate, gender--and the fibers are fairly loosely packed and long--just the reverse of what a good calf would be. As a consequence, these older, less premium, less in demand hides are put through a process that shrinks the leather, compacting the fiber mat...making it feel like a better leather. The compaction will not hold during wetting or stretching, however.

Most every veg tan I use is 3-4 ounce and everything I see that is heavier, is too stiff to make either shoe or boot upper...and I would have to assume to thick to do upholstery with. I'm not saying it's not out there in heavier weights, just that I don't deal with it.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Leather Quality and Properties