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Leather Quality and Properties - Page 35

post #511 of 1197
respect
post #512 of 1197

Thanks to all the real experts on here who generously share their knowledge with us. Much appreciated.

post #513 of 1197
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

Well, first, hot stuffing is really only appropriate for leathers that will be used in casual or work settings. You're never gonna get a polish on an hot stuffed leather. Then too, you've got to consider...what do you want...consistency or natural? Because that's near what it comes down to in this day and age. Hand stuffing, while utilizing Traditional waxes and oils is likely to be inconsistent, as was mentioned above. And may take a considerable amount of time to do correctly.

I suspect that modern hot stuffing relies on oils that will penetrate quickly and distribute themselves evenly. And oils that are inexpensive and which mix readily.

JR outsoles are, AFAIK, primarily Valona tanned. Valona tanning is based on acorn hulls not oak bark as Baker is. Valona produces a stiffer, more brittle tannage than tanning that relies on oak bark. That's been my experience. This is both good and bad, although I, personally, have little good to say about it. I find that JRs tend to be hard to cut and wear away faster than oak bark outsoles, esp. on concrete. Just my opinion and I'm sure it's subjective.

It's very difficult to get Baker outsoling in the US. Generally speaking we have to create an ad hoc buyer's consortium to buy in quantities sufficient to make it worthwhile for both us and Bakers. I have tried for 30+ years to convince tanners and importers to bring it in but almost universally they tell me they can't ever seem to complete the transaction with Baker. Communications break down somewhere in the process and if nothing else it scares the importer off simply because he must have a reliable source to sell the product--buying futurities is not a good strategy in the leather trade.



.

I buy a bit from Bakers - if I can be of any help arranging anything I'll try to be. They are difficult to deal with and have an amazingly confusing product range but if you like what they make there isnt anyone better in my experience

Charlie
post #514 of 1197
Quote:
Originally Posted by Equus Leather View Post

I buy a bit from Bakers - if I can be of any help arranging anything I'll try to be. They are difficult to deal with and have an amazingly confusing product range but if you like what they make there isnt anyone better in my experience

Charlie

Thank you. I'll keep that in mind.
post #515 of 1197
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

Thank you. I'll keep that in mind.

Not at all, pleased to help. I buy bridle and harness leathers from them so very different to what you use but I speak to Andrew Parr whose firm it is pretty regularly and we have regular shipments from them so I imagine it wouldnt be that hard to add bits to our order for us to ship on or somthing like that, provided a shipping method can be found.

Charlie
post #516 of 1197
Quote:
Originally Posted by Equus Leather View Post

Not at all, pleased to help. I buy bridle and harness leathers from them so very different to what you use but I speak to Andrew Parr whose firm it is pretty regularly and we have regular shipments from them so I imagine it wouldnt be that hard to add bits to our order for us to ship on or somthing like that, provided a shipping method can be found.

Charlie

Curious...what's the issue with "shipping method"? Why wouldn't they include an insole shoulder or outsole bend, rolled up, along with your harness sides?

PS...while I appreciate the offer, ...just to be clear...I would expect you to cover your costs and then some--profit is a good thing and an incentive. Which brings me to the next question--provided you can facilitate this with little or no fuss to yourself, would you want to be an ad hoc dealer for insole shoulder in the US? Maybe a half dozen other shoemakers at most?
post #517 of 1197
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

Curious...what's the issue with "shipping method"? Why wouldn't they include an insole shoulder or outsole bend, rolled up, along with your harness sides?

PS...while I appreciate the offer, ...just to be clear...I would expect you to cover your costs and then some--profit is a good thing and an incentive. Which brings me to the next question--provided you can facilitate this with little or no fuss to yourself, would you want to be an ad hoc dealer for insole shoulder in the US? Maybe a half dozen other shoemakers at most?

By shipping method I simply mean the getting the leather from us out to the States or wherever else. We send a lot of belts to the US but a butt/bend is a different weight category so would need to be UPS or similar I guess.

I dont have an issue in principal doing it on a small semi commercial basis, as long as we could establish what and how any issues are dealt with, ie quality which we'd have to refer back to Bakers and what are our issues, ie shipping. We are makers like you rather than leather dealers so it would need to be a simple scheme! Maybe we should take the details to PM?

Charlie
post #518 of 1197

DW-ever work with armadillo leather? Does it polish up well? Hold up well over time?

post #519 of 1197
Quote:
Originally Posted by JermynStreet View Post

DW-ever work with armadillo leather? Does it polish up well? Hold up well over time?

I've seen it., never worked with it. I don't even know anyone who tans or sells it. I've heard that armadillos can carry leprosy. If that's so, I guess I understand why no one is farming them or even harvesting wild ones.
post #520 of 1197
eek.gif i would stay far away

http://edition.cnn.com/2011/HEALTH/04/27/armadillos.spreading.leprosy/index.html
post #521 of 1197
I wonder what Buffalo Bill conditions his hides with.

On another note, kind of throwing this out there for all and Glenjay to think about... With coconut oil, for some reason I was reading about soap making recently and discovered how simple of a process it is chemically. Anyhow coconut oil is the main starting point for a lot of soap, and when combined with an alkali the three fatty acids that make up the triglyceride that is coconut oil break off of the glycerin to form soap with the alkali and glycerin is left over. So, just thinking kind of out loud, would glycerin be a good conditioner for leather? I mean, it is a smaller molecule so would it penetrate better than pure coconut oil?
post #522 of 1197
post #523 of 1197
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

So, just thinking kind of out loud, would glycerin be a good conditioner for leather? I mean, it is a smaller molecule so would it penetrate better than pure coconut oil?

Belvoir Tack Conditioner Spray contains coconut oil and glycerin. They say "Glycerine - fills and seals any pores in the leather; forms a barrier against salt, dirt, grease and water".
http://www.carrdaymartin.co.uk/product_details.html?cid=MQ==&pid=MTA=

Glycerin is a moisturizing agent like lanolin and Lexol cleaner contains it not to dry up leather.
Quote:
http://cool.conservation-us.org/don/dt/dt2026.html
Lanolin has sufficient capability to exchange water with the surrounding atmosphere and to maintain relatively long-term flexibility and softness of HANDLE in the leather.
Quote:
http://soaperschoice.com/soapoils/lanolin.html
Lanolin has the unique property of absorbing twice its own weight of water.
post #524 of 1197
Quote:
Originally Posted by VegTan View Post

Belvoir Tack Conditioner Spray contains coconut oil and glycerin. They say "Glycerine - fills and seals any pores in the leather; forms a barrier against salt, dirt, grease and water".
http://www.carrdaymartin.co.uk/product_details.html?cid=MQ==&pid=MTA=

Glycerin is a moisturizing agent like lanolin and Lexol cleaner contains it not to dry up leather.

Glycerine saddle soap has been around since Noah was a boy and seems to do a reasonable job with saddlery. It tends to make the leather greasy to the touch and isnt good around leather you want to polish.

Charlie
post #525 of 1197
Quote:
Originally Posted by Equus Leather View Post

Glycerine saddle soap has been around since Noah was a boy and seems to do a reasonable job with saddlery. It tends to make the leather greasy to the touch and isnt good around leather you want to polish.

Charlie

+1

It also picks up dust and grit and tends to collect in the creases...accelerating the chances of cracking.
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