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Leather Quality and Properties - Page 68

post #1006 of 1279
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Allegedly in the past animals were raised for their hides, which is why older, vintage shoes and such were such better quality and have lasted.

That's not to say the meat wasn't eaten...it was...simply that the breeds were selected and raised for their hides. Some beef are dairy, but animals raised primarily for for meat still give milk.
post #1007 of 1279
Got my pair of George Cleverley Suede Loafers, quite enjoying them.

however, when the shoe trees are inside the shoe, and when I am wearing it, the soft unlined suede calf around the vamp area warps and move inwards, as shown in the photo below, made obvious by the lighter apron line.

I guess my shoe isn't the same as the last it is designed on, anyone else experienced this with suede shoes?

post #1008 of 1279

It seems that the shoe tree, in the internal forepart is too large for the shoe, hence the warping.

post #1009 of 1279
Quote:
Originally Posted by CalzolaiFeF View Post
 

It seems that the shoe tree, in the internal forepart is too large for the shoe, hence the warping.

 

@wurger- maybe you need to take out the added insoles when you tree your shoes

post #1010 of 1279
it's there when I wear the shoes, with or without the insoles, I reckon it's just the soft quality of the suede.
post #1011 of 1279
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chowkin View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by CalzolaiFeF View Post

 
It seems that the shoe tree, in the internal forepart is too large for the shoe, hence the warping.

@wurger
- maybe you need to take out the added insoles when you tree your shoes

actually, you are right, I tried a smaller split toe tree, better, thanks! But the warp will remain when my feet is inside.
post #1012 of 1279
Quote:
Originally Posted by CoffeeDudeGuy View Post

For those who love love love bags, here's how to knock off a bag.

Thanks to coffeedudeguy! Interesting video
post #1013 of 1279
I can actual imagine DW do a similar video about shoe making satisfied.gif
post #1014 of 1279
Quote:
Originally Posted by wurger View Post

I can actual imagine DW do a similar video about shoe making satisfied.gif

nod[1].gif
I've done a number over the years. But I don't know how to upload video on this software. I don't do YouTube or Facebook.

Could try this...a short clip that is part of a series of six or so demonstrating the preparation of a "waxed end" for Traditional HW inseaming:

http://www.bootmaker.com/pics/styleforum/preparing the bristles.wmv

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Edited by DWFII - 1/19/14 at 7:54am
post #1015 of 1279
wow, intense bristle work
post #1016 of 1279
Quote:
Originally Posted by wurger View Post

wow, intense bristle work

One small step for a shoemaker one, giant leap for...smile.gif

Without the knowledge of using real 8" India Blond or Siberian Black, the leap to splitting the nylon was not going to be apparent.

The British started using nylon bristles some time ago. I used to get some small packets from my friend at CWF...although I do not believe that they were made from monofilament fishing line, They'd rough up the bristle with sandpaper (as illustrated in the video) and then using the teeth of a lasting plyer crimp the portion they intended to wrap. It works...to a point..

But splitting the bristle and then plying the taw and the legs of the bristle together is near-as-nevermind foolproof.

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Edited by DWFII - 1/20/14 at 10:18am
post #1017 of 1279
BTW...and not to toot my own horn too loudly...I'm pretty certain I invented the technique of splitting the nylon bristle. Of course, boar's bristles are naturally split--like over grown split ends, which is why I mentioned the 8" India Blonds, etc.. So, the idea was a natural progression and was rattling around out there--a friend suggested (but never, to my knowledge actually tried it) that nylon might be split with a Fortuna skiving machine. I did try it and damned near ruined the bell knife.

I never saw nor heard of anyone being so illogical as to think they could split a piece of nylon monofilament with just a sharp knife until I did it and started showing it around.

But it illustrates a point--that knowledge is cumulative and requires hands-on experience to acquire and to push forward. Expertise is not to be had from a book or a video or copy and paste from the Internet.

--
Edited by DWFII - 1/20/14 at 10:30am
post #1018 of 1279
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

BTW...and not to toot my own horn too loudly...I'm pretty certain I invented the technique of splitting the nylon bristle. Of course, boar's bristles are naturally split--like over grown split ends, which is why I mentioned the 8" India Blonds, etc.. So, the idea was a natural progression and was rattling around out there--a friend suggested (but never, to my knowledge actually tried it) that nylon might be split with a Fortuna skiving machine. I did try it and damned near ruined the bell knife.

I never saw nor heard of anyone being so illogical as to think they could split a piece of nylon monofilament with just a sharp knife until I did it and started showing it around.

But it illustrates a point--that knowledge is cumulative and requires hands-on experience to acquire and to push forward. Expertise is not to be had from a book or a video or copy and paste from the Internet.

--


These posts are amazing. What you are saying is very profound. When I was studying, doing a doctorate in plant sciences, I tried to understand the relationship I was having with the machines and bench techniques I was using. Often they weren't giving me the results I wanted, or was expecting. But hour after hour, month after month, working with these methods, I realized it was they that were teaching me something. And when I started to listen, a different relationship grew. I was reading Arthur Koestler's "Ghost in the Machine" at the time, and I think (but not sure, because I need to read it again) that's what he was talking about. It's the act of doing which teaches. And that can't be gained by anything else but doing. Please show us more about this method. Thanks for sharing your knowledge.

post #1019 of 1279
Quote:
Originally Posted by thelonius View Post

It's the act of doing which teaches. And that can't be gained by anything else but doing. Please show us more about this method. Thanks for sharing your knowledge.

fing02[1].gif

What kind of "more" do you want to see / know?
post #1020 of 1279
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


fing02[1].gif

What kind of "more" do you want to see / know ?

Do you have any photos of use of the nylon, following splitting, as a needle ?

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