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Europe in October - Need Advice - Page 3

post #31 of 40
Maybe a few things regarding cash in Europe:
- ATMs are everywhere, but there will be a fee usually in the amount of 3-5 Euro charged by the bank operating the ATM. This comes on top to any fees your bank charges on drawing cash abroad.
However, this might be interesting for you http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Global_ATM_Alliance
- Plastic is accepted widely, but in form of Maestro debit cards and not Credit Cards! Acceptance of credit cards depends on the country with VISA and Mastercard being the safest bets followed by Amex.
In bigger cities or in very touristy areas chances are high that credit cards are accepted.
- Checks do not really exist anymore in Europe.

The amount you need depends on your spending pattern and cost of living in the area you visit. Where are you going to?
post #32 of 40
You don't need to take all the cash you need up front (too risky too)- take enough for what you need the first day or so then hit an ATM.

American CC's are finally starting to get chipped so it will eventualy make things easier. And regarding CC's- you probably know this but be sure to tell your cards that you will be overseas and when- most set you up now so that your charges go right through. Some cards will block you by default until you say it's you.
post #33 of 40
Moo - A lot of good advice here... namely, don't try and visit too many places for such a short trip. Flights from Paris to Rome are only around 50e, so skip any long train rides. We just got back from about a month in France and Italy last June, albeit with the kids. We've been previously, both with and without them, on numerous occassions. My vote would be Paris and Rome. Les Marais (4th) and Trastevere... you will have a very romantic and fun time. Next time we head back for a couple weeks, hopefully without the kids, we'll do this fosho.

I would personally consider San Sebastian as well. We were able to slip off without the kids, as my parents were in Biaritz at the same time, for a night and two-days. Epic food and fun bars/nightlife. I'd even take it over Rome, (but probably not if I'd never been to Rome before).
Edited by cocostella - 9/8/13 at 11:21am
post #34 of 40
Thread Starter 
Thanks all. smile.gif

We have decided on Paris and Nice for our first trip to Europe. My wife very much wants to see the South of France, so I must oblige. smile.gif

Next time, we bring the kid(s) and go elsewhere. icon_gu_b_slayer[1].gif
post #35 of 40

You'll love Paris, great choice for this trip. For an anniversary holiday I would choose a regional Italian option. Italy because the people and the culture are every bit as engaging and passionate as the French, and the options I'm going to seell you on are all within easy reach of Paris.

1. For romance, Venice! This is an experience you'll remember forever, no matter how many future holidays you take together. Magical, and plenty of walking, exploring, catching vaporettos around the canals and to other islands to fill a week. Go!

2. For stunning scenery, and beautiful walks, Cinque Terre. Five small hillside villages by the sea, all connected by a rail line. From Paris: light to Genoa or Pisa and a connecting train. I stayed in Riomaggiore last year but a y town that takes your fancy would be equally blissful.

3. Are you both 'foodies'? Piedmont, in the north west (i.e. close to Paris!) is the home of the slow food movement, and they have a food festival from mid-October till mid-November. I'm going in late October, can't wait! http://www.fieradeltartufo.org/index.jsp?idProgetto=2

4. Tuscany - wow. Spent about 10 days using Florence and Siena as my base here last year, two amazing towns, small enough to walk around, so much to do, especially if you like your art, Florence. Truly you could pick any of the incredible Tuscan towns - and explore local wineries on a day trip. Direct flight to Florence, bam!

 

If it were me, in your circumstances, Venice. If you make it have a Bellini in Harry's for me.

post #36 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Moo View Post

Thanks all. smile.gif

We have decided on Paris and Nice for our first trip to Europe. My wife very much wants to see the South of France, so I must oblige. smile.gif

Next time, we bring the kid(s) and go elsewhere. icon_gu_b_slayer[1].gif

Excellent choices! Since you're going to Nice, consider a half-day stop in Monte Carlo. If's like a 15 minute train ride away and totally worth it.

Paris is a big city so you'd be wise to do a bit of planning in advance. Also, get the Paris Museum Pass (you can order it online in advance). You'll save hours of waiting in line and dollars too. http://en.parismuseumpass.com/

Enjoy!
post #37 of 40
post #38 of 40
And as your going to Nice, consider even Cinque Terre: you can arrive there by train from Nice in a couple of hours: very caratteristic places, full of typical small restaurants: you'd like for sure.
https://www.google.it/search?q=cinque+terre&ie=UTF-8&gl=it&hl=it&tbm=isch&source=og&sa=N&tab=li&biw=1024&bih=643&sei=6Ug3UpveH8XStAaQ0IHYBA#gl=it&hl=it&q=cinque+terre+panorama&tbm=isch
post #39 of 40

Any London people who can help me out? I'll be there for 3 days in November for a concert, and want to know the best pubs to go to, or best things to see... Was thinking of going to the National Gallery, have already been to the Tate... any advice about neighborhoods, pubs, cafés, shops is welcome... Also any tattoo shop recommendations!!!

post #40 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Moo View Post

Thanks all. smile.gif

We have decided on Paris and Nice for our first trip to Europe. My wife very much wants to see the South of France, so I must oblige. smile.gif

Next time, we bring the kid(s) and go elsewhere. icon_gu_b_slayer[1].gif

Just fyi, one thing that is woefully undermentioned when traveling in (Southern) Europe is learning a bit of the local language- it can make say going into cafes a pleasant experience or an embarrassing ordeal upsetting patrons behind you. No matter how polite you try to be, expecting a local to speak English with you (even though they undoubtedly can) is fulfilling one of the most piggish American/Brit stereotypes. I'll be the first to admit that it sucks when you request '2 green macaroons please' in French, only to have the baker ask you something else back in rapid unintelligible slang, but the point is you tried and you can usually get close to what you asked for.
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