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Job offer rescinded

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 
...in a tricky career situation right now and looking for some advice:

Recently interviewed for a mid-level position with a large company (don't want to go into detail for obvious reasons). Nailed the interview and expected an offer, which I recieved from HR last week. The salary offered was generous and I didn't try to negotiate. I did, however ask about other benefits and potential incentives (bonus, tuition, etc) but all within reason and was careful not to be pushy or demanding. Recruiter said he would look into my questions and get back to me.

Recieved a call only a few hours later, and recruiter had quite a different tone. Again, don't want to go into too much detail, but he mentioned that the offer may have been "premature" and he would need to look into some things. I asked for clarification, but recieved only a jumbled, incoherent response and was told he would be in touch. Sounded to me like he was preparing to rescind the offer. Luckily I'm not stupid enough to have made any brash decisions without an official letter, but needless to say I'm kind of pissed.

Ican't imagine it was anything I said. Do you guys think it's something else going on behind the scenes? Maybe another candidate who turned the job down reconsidered? Has this happened to anyone, and if so, how'd you handle it? Part of me says I should be checking in and part of me says I should be patient.
post #2 of 26
you mention getting an offer from "HR" but also that you were asking questions of the "recruiter." Are you dealing with the company directly or is this all coming through a third-party recruiter?

Presuming you didn't do anything colossally stupid in the convo, and I can't imagine what that would be, there is definitely something going on behind the scenes. Maybe a hiring freeze came online after your verbal, maybe another candidate came into play. If this is all dealing with the company directly, while it sucks, ultimately you really have zero legal recourse and it's probably a sign of how you might have been treated once employed with the firm. A "premature" offer is a really, really unprofessional and shitty move.

Sucks to say, but there's not much you can do other than sit tight, and if the offer is rescinded, to walk away with class just in case there was a major cockup and someone eventually loses their job over it. Nothing to be gained by making a stink.

If it's a third party recruiter that fucked up, it might be worth a direct call to the employer to tell them the story, though it's still not likely to result in much other than them perhaps choosing not to use that recruiter in future.
post #3 of 26
Thread Starter 
Sorry, that was unclear; the recruiter is an employee of the company. I tend to use recruiter and HR interchangeably. I have heard some horror stories about this company's HR/recruiting, but very good things about the department/managers I interviewed with.

I guess sitting tight is the right move, but if I don't hear back within the next day or two, I feel like I should (and they would expect me) to follow up. Not to make a stink, but to at least get a handle on the situation. Its tough because I don't even know whether it was actually rescinded, or what the timeline is for hearing back. When I asked, I was given a vague "we will be in touch soon" response.

Also, this is a very large company with hundreds of openings and numerous in this same department currently posted on the website. A hiring freeze is not plausible. It could potentially be that another candidate came into the picture, but that's unlikely over the course of the couple hours between our conversations. It's especially unlikely because I'm qualified and had great rapport with the managers.
post #4 of 26
Both my wife and I have had problems with large company HR departments. My wife was told informally by a company that she was going to get the job. Then apparently the hiring manager got let go, and despite the fact that they still wanted to fill the position, they instead relisted it and told her to reapply, so she decided to just move on.

My situation was similar to yours. I was interviewing for a lateral move, and I thought the interview went okay (not great), but I hadn't heard in the time-frame I was told. So I called the HR recruiter, and I asked her. She told me, "We're sorry, you didn't get the job; however, there are two other identical openings under different managers, so we'll get you setup with interviews with them because we think you'll be a good fit in the company."

I then got a call the next day telling me I did get the job. Then after a few days, they came back to me and said, "We were putting together your offer letter, and it is actually going to be $x rather $y" where x was 30% lower than y. It was a big charlie foxtrot and I eventually just walked away.
post #5 of 26

That's what you get for walking past dollars to get pennies. If the salary was truly "generous," then you shouldn't have tried to push for more benefits. Is it me, or does that seem a little idiotic? I could understand pushing a bit harder if you didn't really care about the job and just wanted to see how far you could go, but if that was the case, then you wouldn't be "pissed."

 

My guess is that they've got another interview and they want to see what comes from it. Maybe your senseless request made them interested in administering the other interview. That could explain why HR made the offer but the recruiter was the one who called back.

post #6 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by VinnyMac View Post

That's what you get for walking past dollars to get pennies. If the salary was truly "generous," then you shouldn't have tried to push for more benefits. Is it me, or does that seem a little idiotic? I could understand pushing a bit harder if you didn't really care about the job and just wanted to see how far you could go, but if that was the case, then you wouldn't be "pissed."

 

VinnyMac, normally your advice is spot on, but in this matter I think you're way off base. Your post seems even at odds with what OP said:

 

Quote:
The salary offered was generous and I didn't try to negotiate. I did, however ask about other benefits and potential incentives (bonus, tuition, etc) but all within reason and was careful not to be pushy or demanding.

 

I take your point, don't negotiate for more if you like the offer. But that doesn't seem to be the case. It's hard to judge without having heard the actual conversation, but in general I think every candidate considering getting a job should expect to learn about a company's full range of benefits. Hopefully, they will explain them to you without your having to pry; but if they don't, I think it would be irresponsible to accept without a clear explanation. Personally, I would want to know about the retirement plan (if a 401K, when are you eligible to join, what is the match and if there is a vesting schedule), the vacation/time-off policy, health care (premiums and eligibility), and any other benefits (OP mentioned tuition).

 

Perhaps when you move into larger salaries, benefits (excluding bonuses) become less relevant, but in my case benefits have been the difference between accepting a job and turning one down. A couple of years ago, I was offered a $10K increase to join another company. They offered a week less of vacation and I wasn't able to join the 401K for over a year. When I took that into account, I wouldn't really be making any more money. So I declined the position, after they wouldn't increase their offer.

post #7 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Rural Juror View Post

 

VinnyMac, normally your advice is spot on, but in this matter I think you're way off base. Your post seems even at odds with what OP said:

 

 

I take your point, don't negotiate for more if you like the offer. But that doesn't seem to be the case. It's hard to judge without having heard the actual conversation, but in general I think every candidate considering getting a job should expect to learn about a company's full range of benefits. Hopefully, they will explain them to you without your having to pry; but if they don't, I think it would be irresponsible to accept without a clear explanation. Personally, I would want to know about the retirement plan (if a 401K, when are you eligible to join, what is the match and if there is a vesting schedule), the vacation/time-off policy, health care (premiums and eligibility), and any other benefits (OP mentioned tuition).

 

Perhaps when you move into larger salaries, benefits (excluding bonuses) become less relevant, but in my case benefits have been the difference between accepting a job and turning one down. A couple of years ago, I was offered a $10K increase to join another company. They offered a week less of vacation and I wasn't able to join the 401K for over a year. When I took that into account, I wouldn't really be making any more money. So I declined the position, after they wouldn't increase their offer.

I hear you. I guess it comes down to how you read OP's post. OP, did you ask for more benefits or did you simply ask "what are the benefits?" If it's the first, then I'm sticking to what I said; you shouldn't have done that. If it's the second, then The Rural Juror is more on point. I'm guessing that OP asked for more benefits than what the HR person offered. If he didn't, then I don't understand why the HR person would have had to look into it. Generally, they have an offer letter that they read directly from during offer calls. He would have been able to accept, ask for more or request time to think.

post #8 of 26
Entirely possible that they offered the wrong person. Meaning they said contact "A" and accidentally contacted "B" - and were mortified/embarrassed... and responded badly.
post #9 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cary Grant View Post

Entirely possible that they offered the wrong person. Meaning they said contact "A" and accidentally contacted "B" - and were mortified/embarrassed... and responded badly.

Exactly. Like I said in my examples, things happen, sometimes they are told they're going to give you an offer, and they jump the gun a bit. Perhaps something happened internally and now there is a freeze on the hiring.
post #10 of 26
OP, any update on the situation?
post #11 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by VinnyMac View Post

That's what you get for walking past dollars to get pennies. If the salary was truly "generous," then you shouldn't have tried to push for more benefits. Is it me, or does that seem a little idiotic? I could understand pushing a bit harder if you didn't really care about the job and just wanted to see how far you could go, but if that was the case, then you wouldn't be "pissed."

My guess is that they've got another interview and they want to see what comes from it. Maybe your senseless request made them interested in administering the other interview. That could explain why HR made the offer but the recruiter was the one who called back.

This is moronic advice. Only a totally backwards company would make a verbal offer and then sketchily rescind it because someone negotiated the package. More people negotiate their offers than don't. If the employer isn't prepared to up the offer, they say "no" and that's that.
post #12 of 26
Agreed completely. In my field it's a huge mark against you if you don't at least try to negotiate.
post #13 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Douglas View Post


This is moronic advice. Only a totally backwards company would make a verbal offer and then sketchily rescind it because someone negotiated the package. More people negotiate their offers than don't. If the employer isn't prepared to up the offer, they say "no" and that's that.

Obviously, you're not familiar with the real world. You should take some time to log off of your computer and take it for a spin...especially if you're idiotic enough to think that "more people negotiate than don't." At least you didn't say "negotiate WELL."

 

In real life, people can be spiteful and petty, especially if there's another closely comparable candidate in waiting. Offers have been rescinded for less. What's "moronic" is getting the offer that you want but trying to negotiate for more when you know that you'll be upset and start a thread if you don't get the job. There's "negotiating" and there's "being an idiot." You're only experienced in one. My guess is that you've never successfully negotiated anything in your life. That goes back to the "real world" comment smile.gif

post #14 of 26
Ahh, the problems of the internet. Two very different opinions, and not much to go on in terms of who's actually experienced and reliable.
post #15 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by imatlas View Post

OP, any update on the situation?

Finally got my official offer after sweating it for about a week. I spoke with a contact in the company who knows the hiring manager well, and it seems that the internal recruiter jumped the gun and verbally offered without all of the necessary approval. The accepted salary is higher than the initial verbal offer despite the fact that I never even negotiated for more, so I think the manager felt bad about the screwup.

In any event, this wasn't the result of "walking past dollars for pennies". I tend to agree that most companies expect you to negotiate for more.

All is well that ends well I guess. Thanks for the advice everyone and happy 4th
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