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Apartment foo-nishing - Page 133

post #1981 of 2411
Quote:
Originally Posted by CBrown85 View Post

This is interesting- do you have a picture or a link of something similar?
Ours were bought somewhere not online. Lkely Jerusalem and I know that is where I first saw them. See the three "candles" inside this lamp?

Ours are similar but bulb shaped. We have six. Also, they have a hole on the side for filling so the wicks don't need to be removed. I looked not-that-hard and couldn't find the exact ones online.

These are not as nice, especially the wick assembly, but is a similar idea: http://www.northwestglass.com/shop/charming-pegged-teardrop-glass-oil-candle/
Obviosly, you needn't use the colored paraffin. And they are cheap.
post #1982 of 2411
Thread Starter 
I like my Napoleon candle better.

post #1983 of 2411
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fuuma View Post

Tadao Ando on Wabi-Sabi:

http://www.nobleharbor.com/tea/chado/WhatIsWabi-Sabi.htm

Very interesting, though only the original quote seems to be from a Japanese architect. The rest is from some American trying to interpret it. Per this article, if Foo wanted to make his apartment more wabi sabi, he should put his carpet on the couch.

I didn't really agree with this.

An old car left in a field to rust, as it transforms from an eyesore into a part of the landscape, could be considered America's contribution to the evolution of sabi. An abandoned barn, as it collapses in on itself, holds this mystique.

I don't think junk would meet the definition of "sabi" whatever it is. In Japan, there seem to be two kinds of sabi -- which, I guess, are really only one thing I don't understand. The first is transient perfection/beauty e.g. ikebana, a sunset. The second is something like an antique teapot. But it seems an old teapot is only sabi if it is a particular kind of old teapot. For example, it must be perfectly maintained. It takes on a patina through age and use but the thing itself is not chipped and broken. I understand that the most highly prized teapots have intentional defects, e.g. uneven glazing. But these things are, in a sense, perfect, because they are exactly what the person who made the teapot wanted them to be. You are supposed look through the imperfections or contrast them . . . or something.
post #1984 of 2411
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

I like my Napoleon candle better.

I have something like this.
post #1985 of 2411
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bounder View Post

Very interesting, though only the original quote seems to be from a Japanese architect. The rest is from some American trying to interpret it. Per this article, if Foo wanted to make his apartment more wabi sabi, he should put his carpet on the couch.

I didn't really agree with this.

An old car left in a field to rust, as it transforms from an eyesore into a part of the landscape, could be considered America's contribution to the evolution of sabi. An abandoned barn, as it collapses in on itself, holds this mystique.

I don't think junk would meet the definition of "sabi" whatever it is. In Japan, there seem to be two kinds of sabi -- which, I guess, are really only one thing I don't understand. The first is transient perfection/beauty e.g. ikebana, a sunset. The second is something like an antique teapot. But it seems an old teapot is only sabi if it is a particular kind of old teapot. For example, it must be perfectly maintained. It takes on a patina through age and use but the thing itself is not chipped and broken. I understand that the most highly prized teapots have intentional defects, e.g. uneven glazing. But these things are, in a sense, perfect, because they are exactly what the person who made the teapot wanted them to be. You are supposed look through the imperfections or contrast them . . . or something.


Yes, I think they make an odd jump with that sort of thing. Even as an American I think that western interpretations of things like wabi-sabi and Feng Shui are very strange and misused to the point of insulting the culture that they are borrowed from.
post #1986 of 2411
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

I like my Napoleon candle better.

I have something like this.

Why?
post #1987 of 2411
Napoleon is someone you look up to? (I am sorry, that double entendre was lame and cheap, but that also describes my interior decor so feel good about that.)
post #1988 of 2411
Quote:
Originally Posted by dopey View Post

Also, instead of candles, we use blown glass bulbs that fit in candlesticks, filled with oil (really, clear paraffin). The wick is of fibreglass inside a glass tube.

 

No '70s home was complete without the Un-Candle by Corning.

 

 

lefty

post #1989 of 2411
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

Napoleon is someone you look up to? (I am sorry, that double entendre was lame and cheap, but that also describes my interior decor so feel good about that.)
I did, briefly, in college. My grandmother had this statue, it's actually a scene from the David painting, with N on the back of a rearing horse, but her's was a statue. She gave it to me to decorate my college apartment. I later realized that N was a tyrant but did nothing about the statue. Years later I suggested to my wife that we get rid of it, on pol-phil grounds, and she said she liked it.
post #1990 of 2411
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

I did, briefly, in college. My grandmother had this statue, it's actually a scene from the David painting, with N on the back of a rearing horse, but her's was a statue. She gave it to me to decorate my college apartment. I later realized that N was a tyrant but did nothing about the statue. Years later I suggested to my wife that we get rid of it, on pol-phil grounds, and she said she liked it.

Sorry, that was meant for Foo.
post #1991 of 2411
Thread Starter 
I don't dislike tyrants simply for being tyrants. Many of the best leaders have been tyrants.
post #1992 of 2411

Sic semper tyrranis?
post #1993 of 2411




post #1994 of 2411
You iGents are stuck in park. Let me get you into the fast lane. This is a new school of design cropping up in Miami I like to call "Postmodern Russian Tropical." Let me illustrate the key philosophies so you can add some cutting edge design to your otherwise terminally boring abodes - you can thank me later.

Tenet 1: Mirrored is better



Tenett 2: anything black must have a reptile skin pattern.



Tenet 3: unless it's velvet



Tenet 4: offset the lifelessness of your 70 inch TV with something organic, but spray paint the organic item silver to symbolize man's dominance over nature.



Tenet 5: If you need to fill up a room with a large piece, make sure it incorporates Swavorski crystals to add visual interest (look closely at the flocking buttons)



Tenet 6: don't block the view, unless its with a smallish flat screen


Edited by Big A - 9/16/13 at 1:43pm
post #1995 of 2411
"tenet"
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