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Apartment foo-nishing - Page 131

post #1951 of 2411
Thread has gotten very reassuring for everyone's aesthetic judgment as even the owners of the interiors posted know they're awful.
post #1952 of 2411
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jerome View Post

something like natural simplicity but behind it a very high form of cultural development that has been 'mastered' and thereby overcome.

Yeah, I think this is important. My understanding is that it contains the idea that you have "transcended" the gaudy and the flashy. This goes especially to the "wabi" part. (As I said, I find the sabi part a little more difficult to fully appreciate.) To try to translate it into "Western" terms, the idea is "refined" taste in that you can appreciate the beauty and perfection in simplicity. Intellectually, this makes a certain amount of sense to me. If you are in an environment with a million things going on and a million things to see, it is hard to appreciate anything. If you can concentrate on one thing, especially a perfect and/or beautiful thing, you can study it and learn to truly appreciate it. It's the difference between running through a museum and studying a painting.
Quote:
My hometown is Vienna, btw. smile.gif

See, I was going to guess Vienna. And then I thought, "Everybody guesses Vienna. It's always Austria, Austria, Austria. Let's give the poor Czechs a look in."

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hayward View Post

Wabisabi is best understood as the aesthetic equivalent of genteel poverty.

I don't think that's quite it. For one thing, the concept is choosing harmony and simplicity. So it isn't so much being poor as an emphasis on quality over quantity. I don't think it is impossible for the poor to reach the "wabi sabi" ideal but being poor alone, even if you are genteel isn't really it. As I understand it, the ideal practitioner is someone who could do whatever they want but has gotten to a place where they are choosing "wabi'. Once again, I find the sabi thing more complicated.
post #1953 of 2411
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fuuma View Post

Thread has gotten very reassuring for everyone's aesthetic judgment as even the owners of the interiors posted know they're awful.

Now Fuuma, don't be that way. I wouldn't say yours was awful. The coffee mugs were really nice.
post #1954 of 2411
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bounder View Post

Yeah, I think this is important. My understanding is that it contains the idea that you have "transcended" the gaudy and the flashy. This goes especially to the "wabi" part. (As I said, I find the sabi part a little more difficult to fully appreciate.) To try to translate it into "Western" terms, the idea is "refined" taste in that you can appreciate the beauty and perfection in simplicity. Intellectually, this makes a certain amount of sense to me. If you are in an environment with a million things going on and a million things to see, it is hard to appreciate anything. If you can concentrate on one thing, especially a perfect and/or beautiful thing, you can study it and learn to truly appreciate it. It's the difference between running through a museum and studying a painting.
See, I was going to guess Vienna. And then I thought, "Everybody guesses Vienna. It's always Austria, Austria, Austria. Let's give the poor Czechs a look in."
I don't think that's quite it. For one thing, the concept is choosing harmony and simplicity. So it isn't so much being poor as an emphasis on quality over quantity. I don't think it is impossible for the poor to reach the "wabi sabi" ideal but being poor alone, even if you are genteel isn't really it. As I understand it, the ideal practitioner is someone who could do whatever they want but has gotten to a place where they are choosing "wabi'. Once again, I find the sabi thing more complicated.

I took the imperfect part of 'wabi-sabi' as an endearment of slight flaws which are part of the result of building something and the development of character through as materials age.

The pursuit of perfection all while understanding that it will never actually be achieved.
post #1955 of 2411
Quote:
Originally Posted by lefty View Post

Thread needs more wabi, less sabi.

lefty

If I could figure out what they mean, I think I'd agree with you.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SkinnyGoomba View Post

I took the imperfect part of 'wabi-sabi' as an endearment of slight flaws which are part of the result of building something and the development of character through as materials age.

The pursuit of perfection all while understanding that it will never actually be achieved.

I find this kind of useful.

The sabi part has been explained to me as originally something that evoked a sort of wistful melancholy e.g. "Oh, that sunset was so beautiful. Now it's gone forever!" As I understand it, this is why ikebana is sabi. "The flowers are so beautiful! They're all gonna die so soon!" But over time, it became something more positive, I think, at least in part, along the lines of what you are suggesting, SG.

I think part of it is also the idea that there are layers of "perfection". So an old teapot may still be a perfect teapot even though it has "flaws." Like shoes, age and use give it a patina that makes it more interesting and more unique. Or something.

SG, do you find that you use these concepts yourself? For example, when you are restoring antiques, do you try to make them "perfect" or do you somehow try and retain their "character" or whatever we are calling it.
post #1956 of 2411
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bounder View Post

If I could figure out what they mean, I think I'd agree with you.
I find this kind of useful.

The sabi part has been explained to me as originally something that evoked a sort of wistful melancholy e.g. "Oh, that sunset was so beautiful. Now it's gone forever!" As I understand it, this is why ikebana is sabi. "The flowers are so beautiful! They're all gonna die so soon!" But over time, it became something more positive, I think, at least in part, along the lines of what you are suggesting, SG.

I think part of it is also the idea that there are layers of "perfection". So an old teapot may still be a perfect teapot even though it has "flaws." Like shoes, age and use give it a patina that makes it more interesting and more unique. Or something.

SG, do you find that you use these concepts yourself? For example, when you are restoring antiques, do you try to make them "perfect" or do you somehow try and retain their "character" or whatever we are calling it.

This reads like somebody trying to deal with his own OCD.
post #1957 of 2411
Quote:
Originally Posted by itsstillmatt View Post

This reads like somebody trying to deal with his own OCD.

Is OCD a topic you really want to raise in one of Foo's threads?
post #1958 of 2411
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bounder View Post

If I could figure out what they mean, I think I'd agree with you.
I find this kind of useful.

The sabi part has been explained to me as originally something that evoked a sort of wistful melancholy e.g. "Oh, that sunset was so beautiful. Now it's gone forever!" As I understand it, this is why ikebana is sabi. "The flowers are so beautiful! They're all gonna die so soon!" But over time, it became something more positive, I think, at least in part, along the lines of what you are suggesting, SG.

I think part of it is also the idea that there are layers of "perfection". So an old teapot may still be a perfect teapot even though it has "flaws." Like shoes, age and use give it a patina that makes it more interesting and more unique. Or something.

SG, do you find that you use these concepts yourself? For example, when you are restoring antiques, do you try to make them "perfect" or do you somehow try and retain their "character" or whatever we are calling it.

I build new peices rather than restore antiques, so it's not a perfect comparison. I avoid having antiques restored unless they are in desperate need of it because I think something is lost when they are fully restored. I do think they should be kept in working order

I pursue perfection in each step of the process, but I will ultimetly produce something that represents my insight and abilities at the time.
post #1959 of 2411
post #1960 of 2411
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fuuma View Post

Tadao Ando on Wabi-Sabi:

http://www.nobleharbor.com/tea/chado/WhatIsWabi-Sabi.htm

Thanks for posting this. It explains my "genteel poverty" reference.

"Wabi" on its own is simplicity. "Wabi" with "Sabi" denotes simplicity combined with an appreciated and gradual degradation in the way we differentiate "patina" from "rust."

Both can be taken to extremes, which in itself can become pretentious.
post #1961 of 2411

This thread needs more front quarter horsehide sofas and rope-dyed indigo window treatments.

post #1962 of 2411
Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post

Then let's take this fucking room as an example. Let's assume this room was arranged as an honest representation of the owners' lives and their honest pursuits of happiness and beauty. We can assume the following about them:
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
1. They keep their deep-fryer under their coffee table, because they deep fry in the living room.

2. Their reading list develops out of an insistence that the books be bound mono-chromatically, because they've learned good books are grey books.

3. The like to transport their books, so they rest them in a metal pail they'll transport them later in.

4. They once had a plant, but it died, so a memento of it sits on their books. They remove the memento of their dead plant when they wish to read.

5. One rug just isn't protective enough.

6. They like Roman pottery, but not the real Roman pottery. They prefer the postmodern ones made in China for forty dollars each, which can be aggressively aged the archaeological equivalent of 2,000 years in 20 minutes.

7. Real eggs spoil, but fake ones don't, so they keep some on their coffee table in case Easter shows up early.



If you can find interiors which hint of disingenuous arrangement, then you've found "decorated" interiors, and thus bad ones. The ones I post are overwhelmingly indicative of honest living, to the best of my perception. Yours isn't one of them.

I'm sorry to requote, but this is fucking hilarious.
post #1963 of 2411
Thread Starter 
Finally got a table lamp that isn't fucked up. Went directly to the Flos store where we could inspect before paying. I would bet that the online retailer we used before was sending out stuff that had been previously returned to Flos.

15% discount just for asking about it.
post #1964 of 2411
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

Finally got a table lamp that isn't fucked up. Went directly to the Flos store where we could inspect before paying. I would bet that the online retailer we used before was sending out stuff that had been previously returned to Flos.

15% discount just for asking about it.

Which lamp did you end up getting from Flos? I've been browsing for a good desk lamp but nothing from Flos has really bowled me over. I'd like something solid that will last decades.
post #1965 of 2411
We have this from Flos (the big one). I hate it.
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