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Apartment foo-nishing - Page 128

post #1906 of 2411

Well, if we're learning anything, it's that Cappelini is a shitshow. 

post #1907 of 2411
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hayward View Post

Well, if we're learning anything, it's that Cappelini is a shitshow. 

It's not Cappellini. It's Flos. We have exactly two items from Cappellini: the coffee table and vase. But that's okay, we can keep pretending I ordered my entire living room from the Cappellini catalog if that helps everyone enforce their own narratives of my personality and taste.
post #1908 of 2411
i like SG's lamp
post #1909 of 2411
has anything you ordered arrived in new condition and undamaged?
post #1910 of 2411
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

has anything you ordered arrived in new condition and undamaged?

The balls?
post #1911 of 2411
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post


So, go ahead, show us your living room. That challenge goes out to all of you. Show me what an honest room looks like that reflects your eccentric soul. Prove to me you aren't merely attempting to justify an ugly room and zero taste.

I've posted this before, I may have the most unpopular living space on SF. LOL Here's the living room, first pic is move in day, and I bought it furnished so none of this shit is mine. How's that for honest living?



I've personalized it by deleting all of the accessories, adding the table and lamp by the couch so I can actually read there, and removing and patching over the ceiling fan. Here's my wife "enjoying" the space.

post #1912 of 2411
Quote:
Originally Posted by TC (Houston) View Post

I may have the most unpopular living space on SF.

This is a distinction I plan to aim for.
post #1913 of 2411
I won't pick on your house too much TC, but my major complaint with this style of architecture is the lack of appropriate proportion. The room is very large, with very tall ceilings, and yet the built in and fireplace are very small, and the built is positioned so that you use only one small corner of this very large room.

Versailles-Great-Marble-Fireplace-1024x763.jpg

This is how big things like a fireplace can get when the architect is trying to achieve be very grand proportions.
post #1914 of 2411
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

This is a distinction I plan to aim for.

LOL My home office gets a decent reception in some of the other threads. smile.gif

post #1915 of 2411
THAT PLACE IS EVIL AND FULL OF TEMPTATION!
post #1916 of 2411
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

Just remember, Foo did not draw the red line, the thread drew the red line.

Teh Foo got foofed? confused.gif
post #1917 of 2411
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkinnyGoomba View Post

I won't pick on your house too much TC, but my major complaint with this style of architecture is the lack of appropriate proportion. The room is very large, with very tall ceilings, and yet the built in and fireplace are very small, and the built is positioned so that you use only one small corner of this very large room.

Yes, I don't disagree. To be honest, it is the large open spaces that appealed to me most about this house, but it has a number of issues just as you describe. There are always compromises, and we don't plan to live here forever. But we've really enjoyed it for the time being.
post #1918 of 2411
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TC (Houston) View Post

I've posted this before, I may have the most unpopular living space on SF. LOL Here's the living room, first pic is move in day, and I bought it furnished so none of this shit is mine. How's that for honest living? Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)



I've personalized it by deleting all of the accessories, adding the table and lamp by the couch so I can actually read there, and removing and patching over the ceiling fan. Here's my wife "enjoying" the space.


I can't lie: I hate the style.

However, beyond that, I think the layout is highly problematic. The space is ill-defined, as the two side chairs and side table are too far away from the sofa; someone sitting on the far edge of the sofa could not have a comfortable conversation with someone sitting in one of the chairs. Moreover, the fireplace is positioned like an afterthought. It should be central to a sitting area, not outside of it. Overall, everything is too small to be so spread apart. Given the size of the room, you could easily move everything closer and arrange two or three distinct living areas.

I would move the sofa inward, toward the media cabinet, and rotate it so that one side faces the cabinet and the other faces the window. You can now add a bookshelf to the wall where the sofa used to sit against. You can also add a console adjacent to the side of the sofa near the fire place. Take the two chairs and side table, and move them to face the fireplace. The one closer to the console can be facing it head-on, the other can be placed at an angle, with the side table in-between.

Now you have three distinct, usable spaces: a TV-watching/sitting area, additional walkable space for storage of books and other items, and a sitting area around the fireplace. Plus, every seating position would be oriented toward something worth looking at (the windows, the TV, or the fireplace).
post #1919 of 2411
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

I can't lie: I hate the style.

However, beyond that, I think the layout is highly problematic. The space is ill-defined, as the two side chairs and side table are too far away from the sofa; someone sitting on the far edge of the sofa could not have a comfortable conversation with someone sitting in one of the chairs. Moreover, the fireplace is positioned like an afterthought. It should be central to a sitting area, not outside of it. Overall, everything is too small to be so spread apart. Given the size of the room, you could easily move everything closer and arrange two or three distinct living areas.

I would move the sofa inward, toward the media cabinet, and rotate it so that one side faces the cabinet and the other faces the window. You can now add a bookshelf to the wall where the sofa used to sit against. You can also add a console adjacent to the side of the sofa near the fire place. Take the two chairs and side table, and move them to face the fireplace. The one closer to the console can be facing it head-on, the other can be placed at an angle, with the side table in-between.

Now you have three distinct, usable spaces: a TV-watching/sitting area, additional walkable space for storage of books and other items, and a sitting area around the fireplace. Plus, every seating position would be oriented toward something worth looking at (the windows, the TV, or the fireplace).

Not surprised at all, nor am I offended. FWIW my previous house was much closer to what your current place looks like. We went a totally different direction. I'm not sure which I prefer, but change is nice. This is a lot more comfortable, I don't freak out about my son taking running jumps onto the furniture. My contemporary stuff in the old house would have all been broken/damaged by now.

Thanks for the thoughts. Your observations are interesting, and I agree with most of them. The two side chairs are now positioned close to the sofa and there's no table between. So the two chairs complete the third arm of a giant, symmetrical sitting U, if that makes sense. The TV cabinet is actually centered perfectly to the opposite couch, so all the folks sitting in the sofa and chairs have a good view of the TV (karaoke monitor). The distance between media/bookshelves and the sofa is actually quite convenient, as it leaves a large area for xbox kinect and wii (practical for a 6 year old).

The fireplace makes no sense whatsoever and we've never even used it. It's not actually in the living room, bur rather at the end of a very long, onobstructed bowling lane type entry hall from the front of the house. So if you're standing at the front door that fireplace is perfectly centered at the end of your view, you can't see the living area off to the right or the kitchen and breakfast area off to the left--just a fireplace in the background.

Here's a shot standing in front of the fireplace looking to the front door (living room to the left where you can see one of the chairs). It kind of gives you a feel of how the living room is a separate area even though not really separated by anything.

9678746767_974a711b93_z.jpg

Finally, it has been really interesting living in a space where I didn't pick out a lot of the furniture. Mostly to this point I've just removed stuff, and we are slowly replacing things. Some things we've grown to like and will keep. My taste has changed a lot after being in that setting for a while. Taking our time to make changes is yielding much different results than if we had attempted to buy all new furniture at once.
Edited by TC (Houston) - 9/5/13 at 10:57am
post #1920 of 2411
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

No.

The monetary value of that particular rug depends on its provenance, history, etc. I only care about the "story" insofar as it impacts the price I have paid. I don't mind saying that I prefer to pay less, rather than more, for the same thing.

I hope that isn't too vulgar for impressionable iGent ears.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

The sort of authenticity I value is not the sort others are talking about.

I value when things actually are what they purport to be. That is the authenticity I care about. If I am going to buy a Beni Ourain rug, I want it to be a genuine Beni Ourain rug. .

Don't foo yourself. You do care about the story. You just care about the particular bits of the story that you care about.

Imagine two identical carpets. Each is handmade and each has the same level of craftsmanship. Each uses undyed wool, etc. Just looking at the carpets, you cannot tell anything else about them except that they are nice hand-knotted carpets made up in the Beni Ourain style.

Now suppose you know that one of these carpets was made in India in a workshop while the other was made in Morocco in a tent. My understanding is that you would choose the Moroccan carpet. In fact, you would be willing to pay more for the Moroccan carpet. Is that correct?

Now there is nothing necessarily wrong with this. For example, I value a carpet's story in that I am not keen on carpets produced by child labor. I prefer carpets that carry one of the international certifications. I know that some cheating goes on but even the cost of cheating imposes some additional costs on child-labor produced carpets and makes them less competitive. Given the choice of two identical carpets, one with a certificate and one without, I, too, would pick the carpet with the better story and I would be willing to pay more for it.

But note that I do not suggest that a child-labor free carpet is somehow more inherently beautiful than a "regular" carpet. If I saw a carpet in someone's house I would evaluate the carpet for itself. The story that goes with the carpet, even assuming it is interesting, would not make the carpet more or less beautiful.

Anyway, the point is we all have our little quirks. You have a particular thing for "authenticity" and that's fine. But others value different things and that's fine too. Someone asked what the takeaway from this thread is.

Sometimes a carpet is just a carpet.
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